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Category archives for Archaeology

How the Naledi Team Solved a 1,550-Piece Puzzle

With Africa’s largest hominin fossil find unearthed and in the lab, Lee Berger called in experts and early-career scientists for an innovative workshop to figure out just what they’d found.

A Brief History of Norfolk Island

Although it’s the biodiversity that brings me to some of the most remote islands of the planet, the inhabited islands always have as rich a cultural history, equally at risk in this modernised world of mobility. Norfolk Island is no exception. There have been four distinct settlement phases of Norfolk Island.

Flora & Fauna of Norfolk Island

Because of the great success in rat control across the island, its actually very hard to find a rat when you want one on Norfolk Island. Long-standing citizen Beryl Evans came to the rescue with a litter of rats she removed from her house. Beryl is also the most recently published scientist on Norfolk Island with her lifetime’s work tagging Tasman boobies (Sula dactylatra tasmani) in the latest issue of the journal Corella.

Cave Art May Show What Happened to Giant Lemurs

Ghostly figures in charcoal appear to show a now extinct primate from Madagascar succumbing to a human hunter.

Using High-Tech Photography to Reveal Ancient Rock Art

Braving heat, humidity, and the darkest dark there is, a photographer reveals a huge panel of prehistoric art.

Exploring the Underground Mysteries of Socotra

Once they’d made the difficult journey to the cave entrance, the real journey began for these explorers on the trail of ancient rock art.

Exploring Civilization Beyond the Walls

Huge walls may separate cultures, but it’s how we interact across those boundaries that reveals the real story of civilization.

The Genographic Project Turns Ten

    Ten years ago, National Geographic and IBM teamed up with a group of international scientists and indigenous community members at National Geographic Society’s headquarters in Washington, D.C. to kick off the Genographic Project. Our plan: To use advanced DNA analyses to answer fundamental scientific questions, such as where we originated from, and how…

3 Surprising Discoveries From the Archaeology of Food

The archaeology of food is filling in the gaps between all the grand monuments and intricately crafted objects that occupied researchers and the public for generations.

3 Things to Know About the Origins of Chinese Civilization

China is big and it’s been around a long time. Top archaeologists peel back the layers of history and reveal how it all got started.

Where Have All the Pests on Auckland Island Gone?

Life on the Auckland Islands is hard. Just ask the settlers of Hardwicke who in 1849 were part of the shortest lived British settlement ever – 2 years and 9 months. The Maori only lasted 10 more years themselves.

Scientists Witness Spectacular Flood Into the Red Sea

Somebody call Moses. Researchers have witnessed a remarkable Red Sea flood of their own.

Mysterious Cave Art of an Island in the Arabian Sea

Socotra is known for its otherworldly plants and landscapes, but deep inside, its biggest mysteries are just beginning to be revealed.

St. Patrick’s Day Time Warp: Ireland Before St. Patrick

No farms, no sheep, no grassy hills—no pubs. This is Ireland at the dawn of the Stone Age.

February 22, 2015: Discovering AIDS’ Animal Roots & Discovering Morocco’s Ancient Markets

This week on National Geographic Weekend, join host Boyd Matson and his guests as they dangle from a hot air balloon over pristine forest, walk from Russia across Australia, protect Italy’s wildlife in a national park, share a language with chimpanzees, document Alberta’s tar sands, track the evolution of HIV, climb China’s mountains and bird watch, visit Morocco’s ancient bazaars, and ski New England’s unusually deep powder.