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Category archives for Archaeology

February 22, 2015: Discovering AIDS’ Animal Roots and Discovering Morocco’s Ancient Markets

This week on National Geographic Weekend, join host Boyd Matson and his guests as they dangle from a hot air balloon over pristine forest, walk from Russia across Australia, protect Italy’s wildlife in a national park, share a language with chimpanzees, document Alberta’s tar sands, track the evolution of HIV, climb China’s mountains and bird watch, visit Morocco’s ancient bazaars, and ski New England’s unusually deep powder.

Using Ancient DNA to Uncover the Hidden History of Patagonia

How far will Genographic Project scientists go to help reveal where we came from? Geographically-speaking the answer may be Puerto Williams, the southern tip of Chile.

500 Years on a Tropic Island in 500 Words or Less

When studying invasive species on a remote island, it helps to know the island’s history. And this one’s good.

December 21, 2014: Reviving the Mammoth, Traveling From Canada to Tibet With 2 Kids and 0 Airplanes

This week on National Geographic Weekend, join host Boyd Matson and his guests as they search for enlightenment at a Buddhist monastery with their families, search for pain at high altitude, sacrifice children and llamas in Peru, recreate the mammoth, don’t finish a bucket list, rap about the wilderness, improve our IQ, figure out how to avoid avalanches in the backcountry, and photograph Europe’s large carnivores.

December 7, 2014: Return “Kidnapped” Animals to the Wild, Save the World’s Big Cats and More

This week on National Geographic Weekend, join host Boyd Matson and his guests as they climb El Capitan with young children, stop the kidnapping of Brazil’s wildlife, save lions by saving livestock, lift a 35-ton stone with prehistoric technology, work to save the last 3,000 wild tigers, visit some of the last nomadic tribes, bottle feed a baby cheetah, and clean up hazardous waste.

Help National Geographic Give on #GivingTuesday

This #GivingTuesday, explore the ways we give around the world and the stories we bring back, and help us keep up National Geographic’s legacy of protecting wildlife, wild landscapes, and human cultures around the world.

Chimpanzees and the Battle Over Human Nature

Were humans born to war? Or is warfare a recent, rare development in our history? Studies of chimps and early human civilizations give clues to the origins of this kind of violence.

Rock Art Helps Reveal Elk May Have Roamed Los Angeles

What if Los Angeles’ largest native herbivore already went extinct and we had no idea? What if native people could set the record straight? Last year I was in the field  researching California’s native Chumash culture and rock art through the help of a National Geographic Young Explorers Grant. Not far from Los Angeles, nestled high in the…

November 16, 2014: Speed Climb 3,000 Foot Walls, Meet the Darwin of NYC’s Rodent World and More

This week on National Geographic Weekend, join host Boyd Matson and his guests as they set a speed record on El Capitan, prosecute poaching kingpins, share survival tips for extreme weather, dig up clues on ancient tsunamis to study for future risk, hold our breath to survive a surfing disaster, call the Malagasy military for an airlift, understand the evolution of New York’s rats, and mourn the Sherpa guides and porters lost on Everest.

The Skeletons of Olmos, Part II: Racing Against the Storm

The ancient skeletons of Olmos don’t give up their secrets easily, and with both a construction project and El Niño threatening to destroy them, time is of the essence!

Tetiaroa Society – The Brando

For the past five years I have worked on Tetiaroa atoll in French Polynesia – famous as the island hideaway of Marlon Brando. This week I was invited to the inaugural meeting of the Scientific Advisory Board of the Tetiaroa Society – a not for profit organisation established to oversee the conservation and sustainable use…

November 2, 2014: Exploring Underwater Caves, Boxing With Ghana’s World Champs and More

This week on National Geographic Weekend radio, join host Boyd Matson and his guests as they cycle around the world, ski some of the world’s “pretty faces,” tell the world of the price of rhino poaching, explore underwater caves, tell stories of the past in song, box with Ghana’s world champions, mourn the loss of our cultural heritage to war, and solve the melting impacts of black carbon on ice sheets.

Can Desalination Help Save a Holy River?

The Jordan River of the Middle East has supported a long succession of empires and other human settlements for more than 8,000 years, but it took less than one generation of modern civilization to reduce the river to a trickle of sewage. Now, the ultra-modern technology of “desalination” — turning ocean water into fresh water…

October 26, 2014: Give a Turtle CPR, Climb Yosemite’s Most Iconic Peaks, and More

This week on National Geographic Weekend radio, join host Boyd Matson and his guests as they climb all of the world’s tallest mountains, write travel stories, pack for a purpose, give a turtle CPR, set records in the Yosemite Valley, find early humans where you don’t expect to, map the Earth, the oceans and Mars, and harvest GMOs.

Is Your Salmon Small Because of Hungry Cavemen?

Stone Age fishermen in northern Spain selected the biggest whoppers, leaving us with a smaller catch, a new study claims.