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Category archives for Cultures

How Paper Cranes Became a Symbol of Healing in Japan

Every day school children visit the monument for the child victims of Hiroshima adorned with a statue of Sadako Sasaki holding up an origami crane. The museum receives millions of paper cranes from around the world. Photograph By Ari Beser.    Hiroshima, JAPAN—Origami, the Japanese art of folding paper, often conjures images of paper cranes, or…

The Coast Guard’s First Rescue

The following is excerpted from my book: Rescue Warriors – The U.S. Coast Guard America’s Forgotten Heroes (now in paperback) Friday, August 26, 2005 The crew of the fishing boat Mary Lynn pitched and rolled in raging forty-foot seas, eighty-five miles west of Key West. With their controls gone and their vessel threatening to break…

Additional Reading About Driftwood

By Natalie Kramer Anderson   This list of additional articles about driftwood and its role in the environment accompanies my recent blog post “The Stunning Ways Driftwood Builds Landscapes“. Driftwood Research Articles Kramer, Natalie, and Ellen Wohl. “Driftcretions: The legacy impacts of driftwood on shoreline morphology.” Geophysical Research Letters (2015). Wohl Ellen. “Of wood and rivers: bridging the perception…

Fuzzy Nautilus Rediscovered and Filmed After 30 Years

Thirty years after their discovery, these unusual living fossils return to the spotlight to be tracked and filmed and reveal the secrets of the deep.

Join Live Twitter Chat With Explorers in the Okavango Delta

Join the team August 26 at 12 p.m. EDT, for a live Twitter chat by following @intotheokavango and @NatGeoLive and tweeting your questions with #NatGeoLive!

In Nagasaki, New Art Exhibit “Antimonument” Rethinks The Bomb

 Visual artist Shinpei Takeda stands in front of his exhibit titled “Antimonument.” Photographs By Ari Beser. “What is Antimonument supposed to mean?” I asked Ryuta Imafuku, cultural anthropologist at the Tokyo University of Foreign Studies. “There is no such thing as ‘supposed to,’” replied Imafuku, partner of visual artist Shinpei Takeda, whose new exhibit, “Antimonument,” is…

World of Dances #15

This post is the latest in the World of Dances series, which profiles ballet and dance photography in iconic, architectonically unique, culturally emblematic, rapidly vanishing landmarks or simply unexpected locations, that Kike captures about during his travels.     Dancers: Katherina Madriz and Liz Valverde. Ballet:  Ballet Juvenil Costarricense Location: Costa Rica Learn more about World of Dances Print Collection Follow Kike Calvo on Instagram, Facebook, Twitter, Web, or LinkedIn Selected reading: Art…

Island Businesses Succeed with Strong Strategies and Partnerships

Are the rules for successful island entrepreneurs different from the rules for entrepreneurs globally? I don’t think so. People often tell me that you have to evaluate island entrepreneurs by different criteria, but based on our experience with the Fish 2.0 competition for sustainable seafood businesses, that is not true. We have many small-scale companies…

So You Want to be Successful on Instagram? Part II

This post is the second in the “So You Want to be Successful  on Instagram?” series, which explores Instagram as the ultimate visual platform. Kike Calvo is a National Geographic Creative photographer whose travels you can follow on Instagram.   After gaining over 300 million users in around three years, Instagram has become the undisputable social network for visual people. It…

Mesoamerican Race to Protect Parrotfish and the Reef

In a dramatic twist to the typical fishing tournament, this friendly competition among the four countries sharing the Mesoamerican reef (Belize, Guatemala, Honduras and Mexico) rewards international players who catch less fish and protect more coral reefs.

Conservation Triumphs on the Eighth Continent

“The true biologist deals with life,” says my favorite author, “with teeming boisterous life, and learns something from it, learns that the first rule of life is living.” After thirteen months in Madagascar, I will dare to call myself a biologist—one who has learned truly what it means to live.

Pledge to Restore Wild Buffalo Unites First Nations of North America

Can the return of a wild animal to its native range help people? Many North American Plains Indians are sure that bringing back wild bison can do just that. This month in Banff National Park three bands of the Stoney Nakoda First Nation and the Samson Cree Nation joined several other tribes to sign the…

Sacred lands and snow leopards

  I imagine England’s green and pleasant land, with a church spire above the gentle landscape. Surely John Constable painted it. Bracing myself against the howling wind and driving snow, thankful for my NGS Antarctic special issue jacket on this mid-summer day, I couldn’t be further from home. Yet, here on the Tibetan plateau of…

Conservationists Clash on #CecilTheLion, Hunting, and the Future

Cecil the Lion’s illegal killing isn’t just trending in news, it was trending in the hallways of the International Congress of Conservation Biology (ICCB) last week. The biennial, five-day gathering of 2,000 scientists is structured by formal, planned presentations. But on the conference’s last day, an untraditional pop-up session called “#CecilTheLion: What Next?” revealed just how factionalized…

Pictures: Nagasaki and Hiroshima Survivors Share Their Stories

70 years ago last week, the atomic bombs were dropped over Hiroshima and Nagasaki. The hibakusha—the “exposed” in Japanese—have overcome social stigma to speak out and tell their story.   The average age of the atomic bomb survivors is over 80 years old, and while many may still be alive for the 75th and 80th anniversary, there’s a sense of urgency to…