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Hōkūle‘a: Making a Grand Entrance in Auckland

After several exciting weeks of traversing the Northland of Aotearoa (New Zealand) and interacting with incredible communities all throughout, our leg of the Worldwide Voyage finally concluded with a sail into Auckland, the capital city, and a day of ceremonies.

Vote For Cape Parrot As SA’s Favourite Bird!

Click here to Vote for CAPE PARROT as South Africa’s favourite bird! The green-and gold Cape Parrot is our national parrot and are only found here, yet most South Africans do not even know they exists. Our Cape Parrot is Africa’s most Endangered parrot species with around 1,000 Cape Parrots remaining in the wild. Their fate is forever linked to…

Indigenous Water Testing in Remote Russia

Jon Waterhouse and his team recently undertook a journey to Yakutia in eastern Siberia to bring water testing to the indigenous people of the region. The immensity and character of Russia weren’t the only things that awed them.

December 14, 2014: Survive The Horrors of WWII With the Hero of “Unbroken,” Chase Water Down the Colorado River and More

This week on National Geographic Weekend, join host Boyd Matson and his guests as they decide survival over summit glory in Myanmar, remain “Unbroken” with the hero of Angelina Jolie’s newest film, spill the secrets of Southern cuisine, track Berlin’s booming boar population, dodge los malditos on the rejuvenated Colorado River, teach kids to value the environment in school, paddle 2,000 miles to protect pristine wilderness, learn the forces that move Sarajevo’s society, and tap into nature’s therapeutic capabilities.

Yokohama to Port Louis: reflecting on the first leg of the voyage

After three weeks at sea with Peace Boat, charting a westerly course around the world, time has become a slippery concept. Every few days we hit a new longitude and gain an hour – an anomaly I’m told will be resolved somewhere beyond Easter Island, when we shoot through 24 of them in sixty minutes.…

Converting “Dumb Luck” to Fortune

Evan Rapoport explains why dumb luck isn’t always so dumb—and how paddling in the ocean led him to work for Google and stare down armed Maori tribesmen for the Worldwide Voyage.

Beyond the textbooks: in Singapore, Japanese Peace Boat passengers reflect on the Sook Ching massacre [Kota Kinabalu to Singapore]

  On Friday 28 November, Sabah tour guide Akmal gave 33 Japanese Peace Boat passengers a whistle stop tour of the Sabah Museum in Kota Kinabalu. The group’s itinerary – which also included a visit to a public zoo and a heritage village, lunch, and allotted time for souvenir shopping – was tight, and they…

December 7, 2014: Return “Kidnapped” Animals to the Wild, Save the World’s Big Cats and More

This week on National Geographic Weekend, join host Boyd Matson and his guests as they climb El Capitan with young children, stop the kidnapping of Brazil’s wildlife, save lions by saving livestock, lift a 35-ton stone with prehistoric technology, work to save the last 3,000 wild tigers, visit some of the last nomadic tribes, bottle feed a baby cheetah, and clean up hazardous waste.

The Disturbing War for Abalone

South Africa’s illicit abalone trade is steeped in the after-effects of apartheid, organized and violent crime, illegal drugs, and corruption. Species like rhinos, tigers, and elephants are generally better at building public awareness than abalone, a large type of marine snail, but don’t be fooled into thinking that the potency of wildlife crime is any…

Unilever CEO: The saving face of corporate climate change

LIMA, Peru — The man behind the podium Sunday at the Global Landscapes Forum, an offshoot of the annual United Nations negotiations on climate change being held here, spoke in blunt terms: “Commercial agriculture accounted for 71 percent of tropical deforestation in the last 12 years. That translates into the loss of 130 million hectares…

Now starring as diplomat: Bianca Jagger defends forests at UN climate talks in Peru

LIMA, Peru – Whatever her youthful reputation as the wife of a world-famous rock star and glittery jet setter, Bianca Jagger has committed much of the past 30 years of her life to advancing causes associated with human rights and environmental protection in the developing world. On Sunday morning, during a side event connected with…

New Xade: A Convergence of the Traditional and Modern

Progress continues smoothly here in Botswana. Within the first two weeks of arriving, I picked up my official research permit from the Office of the President. With that in hand, I met the principal of Maru-a-Pula and got the go-ahead to film on campus with Ketelelo. I’ve already had a couple of shoots with Ketelelo…

Russia’s River Villages: Rushing Back to Moscow

Join Jon Waterhouse as he and his team trek to eastern Russia to bring the Network of Indigenous Knowledge (NIK) and its water tests to the peoples of Yakutia in this multi-part series. On our way back home, we visit Moscow and reflect on our wonderful experiences.

Genographic Project Participants Help Refine Human Family Tree

The Genographic Project recently released the most refined evolutionary tree of the human Y chromosome, which every male inherits directly from his father. The new Y tree was created in part through the help of the 300,000 male participants that have joined this one-of-a-kind project to trace their own ancestry and become citizen scientists. As more…

Russia’s River Villages: Sakha Celebration

Join Jon Waterhouse as he and his team trek to eastern Russia to bring the Network of Indigenous Knowledge (NIK) and its water tests to the peoples of Yakutia in this multi-part series. With business in the Sakha Republic concluded, it’s time for festivities!