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Category archives for Cultures

Educating Future Guardians of the Galápagos

The Lindblad Expeditions-National Geographic (LEX-NG) Fund aims to protect the last wild places in the ocean while facilitating conservation, research, education, and community development programs in the places we explore. This blog entry spotlights some of the exciting work our grantees are doing with support from the LEX-NG Fund. By Angela M. Thomas What comes…

Next LIVE Twitter Chat With Epic Walker @PaulSalopek

Difficulties with visas and permission to enter certain lands have rerouted and delayed Paul Salopek on his epic 21,000-mile walk, but now, after waiting out the worst of the Central Asian summer, he’s ready to set off once again.

The Forgotten Elephants of the Leuser Ecosystem

The future of the critically endangered Sumatran elephant hangs on a thread. Palm oil plantations have converted 90 percent of prime Sumatran elephant habitat to a monoculture desert. The lowland rainforests of the Leuser Ecosystem are the world’s best remaining habitat for the Sumatran elephant yet they are being bulldozed, often illegally, for palm oil everyday.

Blue Guardians: A New Clinton Global Initiative Partnership

Two and a half years ago, the Waitt Institute launched the Blue Halo Initiative, through which we partner with governments and communities as they envision, design, and implement sustainable ocean management for their waters. In the time since, we supported the Caribbean island of Barbuda in passing meaningful legislation that zones the island’s entire coastal…

Fish Spawning Aggregations: an illusion of plenty

Spawning aggregations are massive gatherings of fish for breeding, a behavior shared by many species across the globe in many different habitats. They are predictable because they usually happen at the same place and at the same time each year, and humans have taken advantage of this to harvest large numbers of fish with minimal effort. But as harvesting keeps growing, fish populations keep diminishing.

Syrian Refugee Crisis Is a ‘Flood That Will Reach the Whole World’

AMMAN, Jordan — “To jump into the sea. A normal sane person does not make a decision like this until he has suffered pressure and pain so extreme that he cannot handle it anymore,” said Naser Al Jaafari, smoking on the terrace of Fann Wa Chai, a cafe and art gallery in Jabal Al Weibdeh. Jaafari and his colleagues,…

The Borobudur Temple Ship: Bringing a Memory Back to Life

Preserved in the delicate carvings of the temple’s stone, a ship serves as inspiration to revive deep cultural memories and pride.

Farm Water Management Lessons from the Desert

MARICOPA, AZ — In this patchwork quilt of irrigated green farms tucked into a vast expanse of desert, cacti and mesquite, it seems improbable that water-loving vegetables could be sustainably produced on a large scale. Yet Arizona is second only to California as the country’s largest grower of lettuce, spinach, melon and other such crops.…

Fishers and Divers Agree Coral Reefs Need Stronger Management

Policy change, even at its most efficient, is often difficult and slow. This can be especially true for conservation policy, which often involves curtailing private sector business practices. On the flip side, the policymaking process can be sped up by clear public support. That’s why the recent consensus between the Caribbean fishing and SCUBA diving…

Big Data for Big Animals: Citizen Science Helps Mozambican Wildlife

I check the ‘Talk’ forum on WildCam Gorongosa every day to see what’s new. “Is this blurry antelope at night a bushbuck or a reedbuck?” This is a tough one even for the most expert ecologist. As a scientist who spent several years studying herbivores in Gorongosa National Park, Mozambique,  I plan to chime in, but…

Home, Home on the…Steppes?

A great migration is underway in the world of ranching. Cowboys from the United States, Canada, and Australia are taking cattle by the thousands to Russia and Kazakhstan. Why? To help solve major food security problems.

Trapped in Bureaucracy, Syrian Family is Divided Between Amman and Boston

Two gunshots fired in Syria have separated a young family across two continents. Mohammad, 16, sat down on a mat next to me in his Amman home and pointed at his left leg. “This is where the bullet entered, and this is where it exited,” he said. Mohammad lives with his father, Madian, 44, and his four…

Beyond Japan: Descendants of Atomic Bomb Survivors Convene in Hiroshima

 A participant in the Global Hibakusha Project Workshop watches an example of oral history produced by the Project founder about a previous member. Photo By Ari Beser Hiroshima, Japan—“There was a film about Nagasaki called The Last Atomic Bomb, but in actuality over 2,000 nuclear weapons have been detonated since then,” reveals Bo Jacobs, associate professor…

A Brief History of Norfolk Island

Although it’s the biodiversity that brings me to some of the most remote islands of the planet, the inhabited islands always have as rich a cultural history, equally at risk in this modernised world of mobility. Norfolk Island is no exception. There have been four distinct settlement phases of Norfolk Island.

Dying Wishes From One of the Last Remaining Micronesian Master Navigators

The sacred knowledge of navigating by the stars has been passed down for many generations in Micronesia. Today, with the convenience of modern instruments and technology, only a handful of people still retain this precious knowledge. These “Master Navigators” exist within a paradox where convenience often trumps custom and the gap between traditional and modern grows exponential wider with time. Nearing the end of his life, one Master Navigator has an important message for all those who are willing to listen…