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Category archives for Cultures

Islanders Trying To Save Ancestors’ Eternal Resting Place

Residents of North Carolina’s slender, sandy Outer Banks have been wrestling with the sea for centuries. And they know that the sea–the Atlantic Ocean to the east and large sounds to the west–eventually gets its way. About the best they can usually hope for is figuring out a way to accommodate the inevitable. Sometimes, however,…

Bear Family Gives Explorers an Unexpected Wake Up Call

Imagine arriving at one of the last places on Earth, where, as Bertie Gregory puts it, “wild land meets wild ocean.” It would take two planes, multiple car rides, and a ferry just to begin the journey. There is no access to the Internet and no phone signal. Then imagine a surprise visit in the middle of the night from two unexpected and adorable guests.

Recent Books Recount Horror of 1928 Lake Okeechobee Hurricane (Part 2)

Eighty-eight years ago, a savage hurricane tore across the Caribbean, killing thousands. Its winds probably reached 160 mph at times. The storm turned and crossed the Bahamas before smashing ashore at West Palm Beach, Florida on September 16-17, 1928. It tore across the Everglades to giant, shallow Lake Okeechobee, where uncounted thousands of migrant workers…

Recent Books Recount Horror of 1928 Lake Okeechobee Hurricane

Eighty-eight years ago, a savage hurricane tore across the Caribbean, killing thousands. Its winds probably reached 160 mph at times. The storm turned and crossed the Bahamas before smashing ashore at West Palm Beach, Florida on September 16-17, 1928. It tore across the Everglades to giant, shallow Lake Okeechobee, where uncounted thousands of migrant workers…

Mining a Better Future for the Solomon Islands

By Ms. Robyn James, Conservation Director Melanesia and Barbara Masike, Country Program Director, Papua New Guinea, The Nature Conservancy The Solomon Islands are facing dramatic and imminent changes from large-scale mining across the country. Without proper planning and access to information, developments like mining will jeopardize the natural resources upon which most Solomon Islanders depend. With…

National Geographic Footage Lost at Sea for 3 Years Has Returned Home

In April 2013, two 150 lb. National Geographic Cameras were sucked into the Gulf Stream. Three years and a couple thousand miles later, a tiny dog named Scuba alerted her owner to something she noticed floating in the water. One of the cameras, and all of its footage, had been found.

The Fellowship of the Dig: Life as an Archaeologist in the Field

Crawling in holes, finding old jewelry, eating second breakfast … the similarities are truly fantastic.

Celebrating My 25th Ameri-versary

For many people, “immigration” is just another political issue. But for me, immigration completely changed my life.

Hawaiian Voyaging Canoe and Viking Longship Meet for First Time

Two different traditional voyaging canoes from opposite ends of the globe find parallels in their missions of exploration.

16 Voices From Standing Rock

“Our hearts pulled us this way, because the next battle after losing our land is truly the fight for water.”–Shirley Romero Otero quoted in the New York Times

The Hawaiʻi Commitments from the 2016 IUCN Congress

The International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) holds a congress every four years and this year it was in the island archipelago of Hawai‘i. Concluding today the congress adopted ‘The Hawaiʻi Commitments’.

U.S. Gov’t Pauses Dakota Access Pipeline Construction on Army Corps Land

While a federal judge earlier today denied the Standing Rock Sioux’s motion to stop work on the Dakota Access pipeline, the U.S. Departments of Justice, Interior, and the Army have put a halt on construction in the area, saying given the “important issues raised by the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe and other tribal nations” the Army “will not authorize constructing the Dakota Access pipeline on Corps land bordering or under Lake Oahe” until they have reviewed the issue.

Inside Morocco’s Wild Game of Horses, Riders, and … a Puppet?

In a place that can only be called the remote plains of northern Morocco, a festival of a unique game on horseback takes place every year.

From the Front Lines of the Dakota Access Pipeline Protests

Thousands of Native Americans have gathered on the banks of the Missouri River to protest the construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline. Crossing the river right above their reservation, they fear a spill could ruin their water source and way of life. Young Explorer Corey Robinson went to North Dakota to document protesters occupying construction sites, peacefully preventing construction from continuing.

Standing With Standing Rock and the Right to Clean Water

The Native Americans protesting pipeline construction under the Missouri River care—and shouldn’t we all.