VOICES Voices Icon Ideas and Insight From Explorers

Menu

Category archives for Biocultural Diversity

2013 Okavango Expedition: Amazing Video Footage From Paradise (Part 3)

Here is the 3rd instalment of a critically-acclaimed Afrikaans-language nature series on the 2013 Okavango Expedition undertaken by the Percy FitzPatrick Institute of African Ornithology and Wild Bird Trust. This local South African language has origins in Dutch over 400 years ago, so use the subtitles to keep up between English interviews. This insert explains…

Sold Up The River? Hydro Power Threat Re-Opens Debate

Experts agree that the Popa Falls Hydro Power Project on the Okavango River in Namibia will a catastrophic impact on Africa’s soon-to-be newest UNESCO World Heritage Site, Botswana’s Okavango Delta, the world’s largest, wildest inland delta. Namibia is signatory to the Ramsar Convention on Wetlands (1971). This intergovernmental treaty provides for national action and international co-operation in…

International Island Biodiversity Day

The 22nd of May is the International day for Biological Diversity, and this year the theme is Island Biodiversity. Islands house a disproportionate amount of the world’s biodiversity: although less than 5% of the world’s land area, they are home to over 20% of the planet’s terrestrial biodiversity, and in the last 500 years 80%…

May 18, 2014: Kayaking from Australia to New Zealand, Exploring America by Night, and More

This week on National Geographic Weekend, join host Boyd Matson and his guests as they bicker at the South Pole, find the perfect pairing between beer and food, ride off into the Chilean sunset, solve the global malaria crisis, celebrate the desegregation of American public schools, tip our waiter, hunt for Sasquatch, and jog to save our memory.

Everything is connected | Chapter 6: Conservation Economy

Like other indigenous First Nation communities throughout Canada, the Tla-o-qui-aht people are survivors. Over a century of cultural genocide, Christianisation, forced assimilation, land alienation and re-settlement reduced their numbers tenfold and pushed them to the brink of extinction. But despite environmental, social and cultural upheavals, the Tla-o-qui-aht are slowly but surely strengthening their ability to…

Everything is Connected | Chapter 5: Tribal Parks

Like other indigenous First Nation communities throughout Canada, the Tla-o-qui-aht people are survivors. Over a century of cultural genocide, Christianisation, forced assimilation, land alienation and re-settlement reduced their numbers tenfold and pushed them to the brink of extinction. But despite environmental, social and cultural upheavals, the Tla-o-qui-aht are slowly but surely strengthening their ability to…

May 4, 2014: Driving to the World’s Coldest Cities and Cracking the Humor Code

The winter of 2014 was long and cold in many parts of North America. But even the most frigid midwestern temperatures would be considered mild to Oymyakon, Russia’s 472 residents. One of the candidates for the “Coldest Town in the World,” Felicity Aston visited the Siberian hamlet in the middle of winter to learn how its residents deal with sustained temperatures of -76 degrees Fahrenheit. On her 18,000 mile “Pole of Cold” drive from London to Europe and Asia’s coldest places, Aston learned that the residents love winter, because it often provides them with their livelihood, it connects them with nearby towns by letting them drive over frozen lakes and rivers. She also gives tips on how to get a car to start when the mercury dips nearly 100 degrees below freezing.

Inside the Amazonian Basin: Learning, Led Zeppelin, and Life in the Jungle

Jon Waterhouse runs into unexpected encounters with people, animals, and insects in the Peruvian jungle during his journey to connect indigenous people from cultures around the world.

Top 25 Wild Bird Photographs of the Week #66

Long-wattled umbrellabird, strawberry finch, Von der Decken’s hornbill, Blackburnian warbler, Tickell’s blue flycatchers,  and stork-billed kingfisher in this edition! We can give them silly names. We can give then our names? We can, however, never claim these prehistoric species for our own. They have endured the test of time and witnessed the blossoming of this blue-green-white planet over several cycles.…

Everything is Connected | Chapter 4: Salmon People

Like other indigenous First Nation communities throughout Canada, the Tla-o-qui-aht people are survivors. Over a century of cultural genocide, Christianisation, forced assimilation, land alienation and re-settlement reduced their numbers tenfold and pushed them to the brink of extinction. But despite environmental, social and cultural upheavals, the Tla-o-qui-aht are slowly but surely strengthening their ability to…

Everything is Connected | Chapter 3: Ancient Woods

Like other indigenous First Nation communities throughout Canada, the Tla-o-qui-aht people are survivors. Over a century of cultural genocide, Christianisation, forced assimilation, land alienation and re-settlement reduced their numbers tenfold and pushed them to the brink of extinction. But despite environmental, social and cultural upheavals, the Tla-o-qui-aht are slowly but surely strengthening their ability to cope…

Top 25 Wild Bird Photographs of the Week #64

Kingfishers, fish-eagles, orioles, flycatchers, lovebirds, wagtails, bush-shrikes, broadbills, bee-eaters, and laughing-thrushes… A fantastic collection of wild bird photographs that sets the standard for 2014! All these photographers need to be commended for their commitment and skill. We need to do everything we can to make sure that our children get to see, hear and photograph…

April 6, 2014: Riding Horses Across Continents, Swimming in the Arctic Ocean and More

Every week, embark with host Boyd Matson on an exploration of the latest discoveries and interviews with some of the most fascinating people on the planet, on National Geographic Weekend. Please check listings near you to find the best way to listen to National Geographic Weekend on radio, or listen below! Hour 1 – Filipe Masetti left Calgary, Alberta on horseback nearly two…

Headhunt Revisited

Text and Photos by iLCP Fellow Michele Westmorland, Headhunt Revisited project. In 1926, painter Caroline Mytinger and her friend, Margaret Warner, set out from San Francisco for a four-year adventure in the Solomon Islands and Papua New Guinea. With little more than $400, a few art supplies, and a trunk of clothing, they made their…

Everything is Connected | Chapter 2: Enchanted Echachist

Like other indigenous First Nation communities throughout Canada, the Tla-o-qui-aht people are survivors. Over a century of cultural genocide, Christianisation, forced assimilation, land alienation and re-settlement reduced their numbers tenfold and pushed them to the brink of extinction. But despite environmental, social and cultural upheavals, the Tla-o-qui-aht are slowly but surely strengthening their ability to cope…