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Category archives for Biocultural Diversity

Top 25 Wild Bird Photographs of the Week #52

Streamertails, kingfishers, lovebirds, boobies, todies, peacocks and pigeons! Please visit the new Wild Bird Trust website (www.wildbirdtrust.com) and become part of a journey that will change your life! You do not need to donate. You do not need to sign up for the newsletter. All you need to do is take a few minutes to…

Getting to Know Africa: 50 Interesting Facts…

Africa is an enigma to most people… Unrest and violence in Somalia, Tunisia, the Democratic republic of Congo, Egypt and Zimbabwe get more worldwide press than our flagship protected areas and wondrous beauty. Here are some interesting facts about this grand, primordial continent… Please comment on whether you feel Africa has a future? Share this blog with your friends…

Africa’s “Great Work”: The Wild Heart of Africa

The “Great Work” of Africa, the greatest achievements of the peoples of Africa, are the intact wilderness areas that still remain on this wild, primordial continent. Just 200 years ago most of this vast landmass was a never-ending wilderness protected by teeth, claws, tusks, horns and fangs. A patchwork mosaic of forests, lakes, deserts, mountains, deltas, grasslands, rivers,…

October 20, 2013: Paddling and Kite Surfing East Africa, Reenacting Civil War Battles and More

This week on National Geographic Weekend, join host Boyd Matson as we paddle board and kite surf in East Africa before meeting disaster, reenact the Civil War’s second bloodiest battle, motorcycle through the Middle East while searching for enlightenment, and combine rock & roll with genetics while trying to save humanity from infectious disease.

Top 25 Photographs from the Wilderness #17

We are rediscovering that only through sharing will we save this magnificent planet. Social media gives us the ability to share photographs, thoughts, ideas, and knowledge almost instantaneously with powerful effects. A great example of this is National Geographic’s “The Great Nature Project”. This is a worldwide celebration of our diverse planet through photographs submitted by people around the…

October 13, 2013: Arctic Double Dating, Poisoning Rhinos to Save Them, and More

This week on National Geographic Weekend, join host Boyd Matson as we we ski and kayak across Baffin Island, poison rhinos to save them, and meet child soldiers while bearing witness to illicit mines in one of the world’s poorest countries.

Top 25 Wild Bird Photographs of the Week #49

Eleven out of 25 of this week’s amazing wild bird photographs came from India. There are almost 7,500 Wild Bird Enthusiasts following the Wild Bird Trust Facebook page in India and our five most popular cities in the world are in India. The Indian SubContinent is a birding paradise with a patchwork mosaic of habitat…

Best Photographs: 2013 Okavango Expedition

Every year the Percy FitzPatrick Institute and Wild Bird Trust undertake the Okavango Wetland Bird Survey. This is a nine-year project that aims to use 71 wetland bird species as indicators of significant change in the flood regime and functioning of the Okavango Delta. The survey involves “poling” ourselves over 250 miles across this enigmatic…

Most Wild-Caught Grey Parrots Die Before Market

Researchers in the field estimate that 45-65% of wild-caught African grey parrots (Psittacus erithacus erithacus) die before arrival at markets and quarantine facilities in Kinshasa, capital of the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC). Terese Hart, Director of the TL2 Project (www.bonoboincongo.com), clarifies that trappers lose an average of 25%, local buyers declare a 10-40% mortality rate, and air transport to…

Top 25 Wild Bird Photographs of the Week #48

Cuckoos, woodstars, plumeleteers, skimmers, weavers, bee-eaters, grenadiers, laughingthrushes and ground rollers… The wild birds of the world will never cease to astound and amaze. Their natural habitat, however, is disappearing rapidly and most populations are under threat or, at least, in decline. Anyone can walk out their front door and the greener and wetter your surroundings become, the…

What’s a Danajon Bank?

by Michael Ready, Associate Fellow at the International League of Conservation Photographers In April 2013, after four planes, a ferry, and two outriggers, I arrived at Handumon, a remote village and field station on Jandayan Island in the Philippines. As I lay down the first night under a mosquito net, wiped out and bit disoriented,…

Dreams of the World: Newlyweds, from China to Central Park.

This post is the latest in the series Dreams of the World, which profiles interesting people Kike meets during his travels.   Lei and Ming just got married. They both love traveling. Ming, 27, dreams of traveling around the world to see different scenery and meet different people. ¨ I want to become someone who can…

Stalking the Wild Tomato: The Ethnobotany of Genetically Modified Crops

In a place where population growth is moving incredibly fast, added pressure on farmers in India in the wake of crushing debt and failed crops calls for a new agricultural approach. Genetic modification and organic farming present promising solutions. Young Explorer Andrew Flachs will investigate the effect of both growing strategies by interviewing farmers in Southern…

The Great Nature Project features the Florida Wildlife Corridor

I am pleased to share my Florida Wildlife Corridor photography collection as part of the new Great Nature Project by National Geographic. To raise awareness for the Florida Wildlife Corridor, we’ve also created a custom group within the Great Nature Project. Check out the Florida Wildlife Corridor Group to learn how you can post your own photographs to…

Former Yugoslav Barrack Gets New Life as an Art Space and Anarchist Squat

National Geographic grantee Riley Arthur is documenting the ‘Erased of Slovenia’ – 200,000 non-ethnic Slovenian residents who were not automatically granted citizenship after the country split from Yugoslavia in 1991. Her journey led her to an artist colony where she began her search for this community.