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Category archives for Islam

Syrian Refugees Publish Their Own Magazine

Zaatari Camp, Jordan — “We know the camp’s problems because we live here,” says 19-year-old Mohamad Heraki, outside of a tent hosting a photography workshop. Heraki is part of a growing team of journalists based in the Zaatari refugee camp who produce the camp’s only magazine, The Road. Launched in May 2014 by the Japanese Emergency NGO (JEN),…

February 22, 2015: Discovering AIDS’ Animal Roots & Discovering Morocco’s Ancient Markets

This week on National Geographic Weekend, join host Boyd Matson and his guests as they dangle from a hot air balloon over pristine forest, walk from Russia across Australia, protect Italy’s wildlife in a national park, share a language with chimpanzees, document Alberta’s tar sands, track the evolution of HIV, climb China’s mountains and bird watch, visit Morocco’s ancient bazaars, and ski New England’s unusually deep powder.

February 8, 2015: Photographing “Snottites,” Dodging Humpbacks With Feeding Orcas, and More

This week on National Geographic Weekend, join host Boyd Matson and his guests as they dodge humpbacks while photographing orcas, study sulfuric snot deep in caves, understand the invisible brain injuries impacting veterans, learn to tell visual stories at a photo camp in South Sudan, climb up Niagara Falls, put a magnet inside of a cow’s stomach, visit Syria’s refugee camps, and understand animal friends.

November 2, 2014: Exploring Underwater Caves, Boxing With Ghana’s World Champs and More

This week on National Geographic Weekend radio, join host Boyd Matson and his guests as they cycle around the world, ski some of the world’s “pretty faces,” tell the world of the price of rhino poaching, explore underwater caves, tell stories of the past in song, box with Ghana’s world champions, mourn the loss of our cultural heritage to war, and solve the melting impacts of black carbon on ice sheets.

Can Desalination Help Save a Holy River?

The Jordan River of the Middle East has supported a long succession of empires and other human settlements for more than 8,000 years, but it took less than one generation of modern civilization to reduce the river to a trickle of sewage. Now, the ultra-modern technology of “desalination” — turning ocean water into fresh water…

The Coral Triangle: Amazon of the Oceans

Home to over three quarters of the world’s coral species, The Coral Triangle is the underwater equivalent of the Amazon. It encompasses an area half the size of the United States and harbours more marine species than anywhere else on the planet. From Borneo down to the edge of the South Pacific, the Coral Triangle has some of the most breathtaking underwater landscapes, but the majority are buckling under the pressures of overfishing, resource extraction and climate change. Text and Photos by iLCP Fellow James Morgan.

Inside Europe’s Mystical Sufi Lodges, Part VI: Gjirokaster

In Macedonia, the Bektashis face many challenges, but they fight to keep their doors open to those who are willing to share ideas and hospitality. The mountains of Albania hide some of the most remote of the Bektashi Order, yet they are still legendary among the local people.

Inside Europe’s Mystical Sufi Lodges, Part IV: Albania

In Macedonia, the Bektashis face many challenges, but they fight to keep their doors open to those who are willing to share ideas and hospitality. National Geographic Young Explorers Grantee Mehves Lelic reports in words and photos—this time in Albania itself!

Why the World Cup Is About More Than Soccer

Explorer and peacemaker Aziz Abu Sarah finds the intense passions at soccer’s greatest tournament unite people from all countries and cultures for love of the game.

July 6, 2014 Show: Whales vs. the United States Navy, and Visiting Every Country in the World

Traveling to every country in the world without flying. One man’s journey around the globe was punctuated by only a few stops in jail. And another man documents the fight in the United States Supreme Court between the Navy and whale conservationists who want to keep some parts of the oceans safe for the large marine mammals.

Geography in the News: The Uncoupling of Iraq

By Neal Lineback and Mandy Lineback Gritzner, Geography in the NewsTM Uncoupling Iraq As the 2005 Iraqi election approached following the 2003 U.S.-led invasion, ethnic and sectarian hostilities increased dramatically. Now, more than 10 years after the invasion and with the departure of American and allied troops, Iraq appears to be uncoupling. Iraq watchers have…

Inside Europe’s Mystical Sufi Lodges, Part III: Kosovo

In Macedonia, the Bektashis face many challenges, but they fight to keep their doors open to those who are willing to share ideas and hospitality. National Geographic Young Explorers Grantee Mehves Lelic reports in words and photos.

June 8, 2014: Diving From 90 Feet Above Havana Bay, Free the Dancing Bears and More

This week on National Geographic Weekend, join host Boyd Matson and his guests as they run for peace through the Middle East, honor hero war dogs, play matchmaker for dolphins, safely cycle through crowded city streets, pick the perfect outdoor gear, dive from 90 foot cliffs competitively, recover a 500 year old sunken ship, farm the planet’s oceans, and save a species and a community at the same time.

Inside Europe’s Mystical Sufi Lodges, Part II: Tetovo, Macedonia

In Macedonia, the Bektashis face many challenges, but they fight to keep their doors open to those who are willing to share ideas and hospitality. National Geographic Young Explorers Grantee Mehves Lelic reports in words and photos.

Geography in the News: Nigeria’s Boko Haram Terrorists

By Neal Lineback and Mandy Lineback Gritzner, Geography in the NewsTM Nigeria’s Boko Haram A storm has been brewing in Nigeria for several years. In 2011, Christmas Day attacks on Christian churches and a bomb blast to an Islamic school a few days later, foretold a series of brutal attacks that have captured the world’s…