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Category archives for Cultures

Using Ancient DNA to Uncover the Hidden History of Patagonia

How far will Genographic Project scientists go to help reveal where we came from? Geographically-speaking the answer may be Puerto Williams, the southern tip of Chile.

500 Years on a Tropic Island in 500 Words or Less

When studying invasive species on a remote island, it helps to know the island’s history. And this one’s good.

Entrepreneurs around Micronesia Restore Both Fisheries and Local Economies

The Fish 2.0 business competition held a workshop for entrepreneurs from the Federated States of Micronesia (FSM), the Marshall Islands, Palau, Guam and Saipan. The workshop was held in Pohnpei with the support of the Micronesia Conservation Trust, IdEA and the David and Lucile Packard Foundation. Before we went, some colleagues wondered whether there would be…

The long shadows of Augusto Pinochet: Peace Boat passengers meet survivors of the other 9/11 in Valparaíso, Chile

For most North Americans, the mention of 9/11 evokes grey airplanes against white cirrus; slow television seconds; and the obscene inward folding of metal and glass. This collective memory is video-looped on CNN specials, honored by fire-fighter parades and nurtured at candlelit vigils, so that peripheral details – whether we were at biology class that…

Facts and Photos From an Australian BioBlitz

When groups from around the world gather in a place as wild as Australia for something as outdoors-oriented as the World Parks Congress, they’d better not sit inside wearing neckties and high-heels all day. To that end, the recent congress in Sydney included a BioBlitz, an intense, public, 24-hour inventory of all the different living species in the area. Inspired by…

February 8, 2015: Photographing “Snottites,” Dodging Humpbacks With Feeding Orcas, and More

This week on National Geographic Weekend, join host Boyd Matson and his guests as they dodge humpbacks while photographing orcas, study sulfuric snot deep in caves, understand the invisible brain injuries impacting veterans, learn to tell visual stories at a photo camp in South Sudan, climb up Niagara Falls, put a magnet inside of a cow’s stomach, visit Syria’s refugee camps, and understand animal friends.

Watch and Wonder as a Chimp Does His “Rain Dance”

Thunder shakes the air as Garrison, an elderly male, stands upright and begins to strut, grasping at branches with his hands and dragging them as he walks.

February 1, 2015: Shooting Sharks, Models and The Pros and Cons of Adventure Preparation

This week on National Geographic Weekend, join host Boyd Matson and his guests as they motorcycle from Tibet to France, photograph crocodiles, sharks and models, get abandoned near the summit of Turkey’s tallest mountain, celebrate Soviet McDonald’s, eschew risks for the kids, study energy and matter’s dark twins, studying cultures in transition to modernity, prepare 1,000 foods to eat before you die, and blow out candles at Everest’s base camp.

Big Cats Q&A With Super Skier Anna Fenninger

There are very few ways a human being, without the aid of machines, can get itself to move faster than a sprinting cheetah. Downhill skiing is one of them.

Beatrix Ost – A Living Work of Art

Dreams of the World: One Dream a Time. This post is the latest in the series Dreams of the World, which profiles interesting people Kike meets during his travels.   Beatrix Ost is an artist, film and theater producer, designer, actress, and writer. She is originally from Germany, but I found her I her all the way across the world,…

Transitioning from Lived Culture

For the last month and a half, I was living in New Xade, one of the San resettlement villages in the Ghanzi District of Botswana. As I mentioned in a previous post, New Xade is home to a convergence of traditional and modern means of living. When I returned to the village in December, I…

Top 25 Wild Bird Photographs of the Week #75

Wow! We are almost there! Nearly 860,000 Wild Bird Enthusiasts on our Facebook page and counting… This is the 75th edition of the “Top 25 Wild Bird Photographs of the Week” and represents one of the best wild bird photograph collections I have ever seen. This is a testament to how far this community has come and…

Lion Conservation is Evolving in Maasai Mara

    The chief sat in the shade on a plastic chair that his wives had brought from inside. He was dressed to go out, with his wooden accoutrements– the herding stick and club that every Maasai man usually carries – were laid across his knees. His truck’s engine was running on the other side…

Expedition: Fernando de Noronha, Brazil

This week I am packing my bags in anticipation of my trip to Brazil. Over the next month I will be working in the remote oceanic archipelago of Fernando de Noronha, supported by the Ciência sem Fronteiras programme of CAPES. I will be updating my Voices Blog regularly every few days with updates of the…

Seen and not heard: Six months after the World Cup, little has changed for Rio’s Favela footballers

In many ways Breno Washington is a typical 15-year-old boy. He has the look of someone whose body grew slightly too quick for him, but he wears it easy anyway, like a pair of good jeans; he likes the Chicago Bulls and sometimes he smokes marijuana with his friends. Unlike most boys his age, however,…