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Category archives for Cultures

Olazul Seeks a Healthy Solution to Depleted Fish Stocks

By Madeleine May For Santiago Cañedo Flores and other fishermen along the La Paz Bay in Baja California Sur, the solution to depleted fish stocks may lie in harvesting an unconventional product: seaweed. Don Santiago and other fishermen in Baja California Sur are partnering with Olazul, a San Francisco-based organization founded in 2009, to design community-owned…

Hōkūleʻa: An Investment in the Future

The true success of the Worldwide Voyage will not be measured by how many miles Hōkūle’a has sailed but by how many people, especially youth, grow to become better stewards of the Earth.

#okavango14: Highlights Of Google HangOut In Okavango Wilderness!

In late-August, we conducted a 17-day, 340km research expedition in dug-out canoes or “mekoro” across the Okavango Delta. It had taken us almost a week to get to “Out There Island” just 30min before this live Google+ Hangout On Air from the remote wilderness of northern Botswana. We were sitting in the middle of one of…

Chilean Near-Shore Fisheries: From Shutdown to Successful Management

By: Carmen Revenga, Sustainable Fisheries Director, The Nature Conservancy and Cristina Rumbaitis del Rio, Senior Associate Director, The Rockefeller Foundation Today, Chile is a global example for good near-shore fisheries management. The emblematic Chilean abalone, and other important seafood, like mussels, limpets, and sea urchins live in the rocky and sandy bottoms along the Chilean…

A Brighter Future for the Hornbills of India

Among the Nyishi people, the ceremonial bopia hat is indispensable, but requires beaks from endangered Asian hornbills. Now, an innovative replacement has emerged.

October 5, 2014: Climbing Into Volcanoes, Swimming the Seven Seas and More

This week on National Geographic Weekend radio, join host Boyd Matson and his guests as they climb into volcanos to look for bacteria, invent environmentally and academically friendly ways to make tea, create the largest marine reserves in the world, make tiny soft robots, swim the seven seas, survive an avalanche, eat ice cream in the name of conservation, and swim with Great white sharks.

Busting Indonesia’s Manta Gill Trade

This article is brought to you by the International League of Conservation Photographers (iLCP). Read our other articles on the National Geographic News Watch blog featuring the work of our iLCP Fellow Photographers all around the world. Text and photos by iLCP Fellow Paul Hilton. Writing this from a hotel room in Indonesia’s second-largest city, Surabaya, I realize…

September 28, 2014: Meeting A Mountain Legend, Skiing First-Descents in Greenland and More

This week on National Geographic Weekend radio, join host Boyd Matson and his guests as they break human endurance records climbing mountains, win the Google Science Fair, eat like our ancestors, ski first descents in Greenland, vaccinate our children, chase endangered hogs in Uganda, and record a dying language.

Flooding the Landscape: The Site C Dam on B.C.’s Peace River

This article is brought to you by the International League of Conservation Photographers (iLCP). Read our other articles on the National Geographic News Watch blog featuring the work of our iLCP Fellow Photographers all around the world. Text and Photos by iLCP Fellow Garth Lenz. As the small Piper Super Cub climbs, this beautiful valley spreads out below…

The World Is Still Enormous

The world is still enormous, but imperiled. Like traditional navigators, we must see beyond our immediate surroundings to forge a better future.

Beijing and the Bicycle

The great bicycle rush every day in Beijing is iconic and recognized all over the world, yet bicycle culture is slowly being run over by rising car ownership, literally and metaphorically.

Voyaging Reflection: Sources of Strength

Daniel Lin—Hōkūle’a crewmember, explorer, and photographer—reflects on one of the most important lessons he has learned while sailing on the Worldwide Voyage.

Two Traditional Languages Evade Extinction With the Internet

The Enduring Voices Project helps save two traditional languages from being erased with the power of the internet.

September 21, 2014: Living At Sea for 3 Years, Uncovering The Largest Ever Carnivore and More

This week on National Geographic Weekend radio, join host Boyd Matson and his guests as they live on the world’s oceans for three years, create the largest marine protected area, road trip down a historical highway, protect power grids from hackers, eat our way through Rome, find the world’s meanest dinosaur ever, tear down dams, spy on cats, and teach our kids to be wild again.

You Cannot Save the Climate Without Trees

The People’s Climate March that trumpeted its way through the streets of Manhattan yesterday was led by communities on the front lines of climate change—and Indigenous Peoples were at the forefront of this group.  The tropical forests where they live are not only getting hammered by changing weather patterns, drug traffickers, invasive pests, and massive…