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Category archives for Sacred Natural Sites

A Harmonious Resistance Creates Global Solidarity for Standing Rock

For more than a year, the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe has been at war with natural gas’s close comrade, Energy Transfer Partners (ETP), over the development of the controversial $3.8 billion Dakota Access Pipeline, which has frequently been referred to as “DAPL.” (Many resistance members call it “the Black Snake.”) The approved project designs developed by…

The Powerful Voices of Women at Standing Rock

Women—representing many places, ages, tribes, and other identities—are core to the story of Standing Rock. They run kitchens, start schools, organize supplies, provide healing, and offer wisdom. These are their words.

Standing Rock Sioux Invited to Work With Army on Solution for Pipeline Conflict

[The following text is from an official press release by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers.] Statement Regarding the Dakota Access Pipeline Posted 11/14/2016 Release no. 16-027 Contact Moira Kelley (DOA), 703-614-3992, moira.l.kelley.civ@mail.mil Jessica Kershaw (DOI), interior_press@ios.doi.gov Washington, D.C. – Today, the Army informed the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe, Energy Transfer Partners, and Dakota Access, LLC, that it has completed…

Young Micronesians Explore Nan Madol: A New UNESCO World Heritage Site Located In Their Backyard.

Last month, UNESCO officially announced 21 new additions to the World Heritage Sites list. One of these — located on the Micronesian island of Pohnpei — is the ruins of Nan Madol. In celebration of their island treasure being recognized as a World Heritage Site, a group of local Pohnpeian college students took on the responsibility of providing the international community with their own local stories and images of Nan Madol.

In Canada’s Boreal Forest, ‘The Land That Gives Life’ Inspires a Push for Protection

A couple works to win UNESCO recognition to help save the vast wilderness of Pimachiowin Aki and preserve a culture’s link to the Earth  For millennia, the Anishinaabe people of the Poplar River First Nation, in the Canadian province of Manitoba, have called the boreal forest that surrounds and sustains them Pimachiowin Aki: The Land…

Journey Into Te Bangabanga: The Sacred Caves of Banaba Island

The morning was still dark when the young men arrived with their machetes and flashlights. We were on one of the most remote islands in the world, about to venture into an underground network of sacred caves known as te bangabanga. The land below the surface of Banaba, a Pacific island nearly 200 miles from…

Bellringers of the Russian Orthodox Church Toll for Religious Freedom

After 75 years of religious persecution, under the Soviet regime, the Russian Orthodox Church has experienced a renaissance. In belfry towers across Russia, Orthodox bellringers toll their anthems of freedom.  

Wetland Revival: Using impact investment to restore nature

 Conservation interests and agencies gathered along the Murray River in Australia earlier this month to witness the return of water to a wetland system that now rarely receives floodwater from the river, due to construction of large water-storage reservoirs built upstream that capture the river’s flow and sends it to irrigated farms.   With the twist…

Shoreline Creeps Closer To Kiribati’s Sacred Sites

“If, one day, the waves take away these sacred places and they’re gone, we will keep on telling the stories,” explained Takirua Tiare, a traditional storyteller on Kiribati’s Marakei Island. “But I can’t stop that—I don’t hold the answer of the waves.”  As a taani karaki, as the storytellers are known, Tiare, 68, is in charge…

Sailing Halfway Around the World to Find Our Oldest Ancestors

The crew of the voyaging canoe, Hōkūle’a, arrive in Mossel Bay, South Africa, and reflect on the immense significance of this location, as a halfway point of the Worldwide Voyage and as a bridge that connects the genealogy of all people on Earth.

Beyond Japan: Descendants of Atomic Bomb Survivors Convene in Hiroshima

 A participant in the Global Hibakusha Project Workshop watches an example of oral history produced by the Project founder about a previous member. Photo By Ari Beser Hiroshima, Japan—“There was a film about Nagasaki called The Last Atomic Bomb, but in actuality over 2,000 nuclear weapons have been detonated since then,” reveals Bo Jacobs, associate professor…

Taking the Worldwide Voyage Underwater in Australia

The Great Barrier Reef spans more than 1,400 miles and is considered one of the best-preserved marine sites on Earth. Naturally, we needed to see this for ourselves. We needed to take the voyage underwater.

Mysterious Cave Art of an Island in the Arabian Sea

Socotra is known for its otherworldly plants and landscapes, but deep inside, its biggest mysteries are just beginning to be revealed.

In Pursuit of Illegal Loggers in India

In India in a rural area along the border with Bangladesh, Tripp Burwell, member of the Society for Conservation Biology, was helping local villagers learn about forest conservation when they heard the sounds of illegal loggers at work. Pursuit of the poachers resulted in an opportunity to apprehend and talk with the interlopers from a neighboring…

February 22, 2015: Discovering AIDS’ Animal Roots & Discovering Morocco’s Ancient Markets

This week on National Geographic Weekend, join host Boyd Matson and his guests as they dangle from a hot air balloon over pristine forest, walk from Russia across Australia, protect Italy’s wildlife in a national park, share a language with chimpanzees, document Alberta’s tar sands, track the evolution of HIV, climb China’s mountains and bird watch, visit Morocco’s ancient bazaars, and ski New England’s unusually deep powder.