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Category archives for Energy

Climate, Oceans, the United Nations, and What’s Next

For many of us jaded New Yorkers, the United Nations is merely a reason that traffic is periodically terrible on the Upper East Side, when world leaders gather. Perhaps now, after the US Administration has announced it will take steps to pull the United States out of the UN’s Paris Agreement on climate change, we…

10 Handfuls of India

While working on farms and learning about seed preservation this past year for the Fulbright-National Geographic Storytelling Fellowship, I have really gotten to eat some amazing foods. If my hands weren’t in the soil or toiling with seeds, they were usually grabbing the nearest edible item. People talk about how amazing Indian cuisine is — the thalis, the street foods, the home-cooked meals — and yes, those are all pretty great, but where this creative and intricate cuisine comes from, its ingredients, its flavors, its uncooked beginnings, that’s where the real magic lives. This fertile soil (at least that which is untouched by deforestation, drought, or chemicals) breathes so much beauty into our hands. And I consider myself beyond lucky to have held such raw beauty, however briefly.

Holding the Cosmos in Our Hands

“The seed comes from the tree, the tree comes from the seed. It’s like the chicken and the egg. If people want to understand it, they will break the seed apart — they will actually kill it — to see the cells, the chromosomes and the genetics. There is another way to look at this. I plant a seed and a miracle happens — something new is born out of this carbohydrate and protein, a new life is born. This is a miracle, you see? The miracle of life.”

Unraveling the mysteries of lightning

By Tess Lavezzi Light When thunderstorm season rolls around and lightning streaks the sky, we likely don’t ponder the mysteries it presents. Lightning seems to be one of those things we’ve got figured out. Didn’t we learn everything we need to know when Benjamin Franklin flew his kite on a stormy day in a Pennsylvania…

Trump’s New Executive Order Will Worsen Hunger in Africa

Subsistence farmers stand to be among the biggest losers from the president’s dismantling of Barack Obama’s climate change legacy. On Tuesday, President Donald Trump took his most concrete step thus far to unravel his predecessor’s legacy on climate change, with a wide-ranging executive order that dismantles several Obama-era policies to restrict greenhouse gas pollution. The…

Karoo Stories: Narratives from Gariep and Van der Kloof dams

Farmworkers and farmers share their experiences of working and living near Gariep and Van der Kloof dams on the Orange River.

Storytelling in a Slum’s Silicon Valley

“We have a different kind of Silicon Valley here,” Nawneet Ranjan explains. Founder of the Dharavi Diary: Slum and Rural Innovation Project, Ranjan tells how his students use storytelling, technology, and the power of their diversity to raise awareness and develop solutions for issues facing the Dharavi slum community in Mumbai, India.

Why the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency reflects Patriotism

By Saleem H. Ali, Cristina Archer, Jeremy Firestone On December 2, 1970, Republican President Richard Nixon established the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). This was the world’s first major government organization dedicated to ameliorating the environmental condition of its citizens. The world marveled at how the United States was able to address pollution concerns that…

A Flaw in the Plan

What happens when progressive laws confront an industrial reality? This is a story of a small community coming to grips with an steel giant.

Wind Farm Threatens Important Raptor Flyway in East Africa’s Rift Valley

Critically endangered vultures and other migratory raptors are under increasing threat due to poorly placed wind farms erected along Africa’s Rift Valley flyway.

The Human Cost of Energy Development

This article is brought to you by the International League of Conservation Photographers (iLCP). Read our other articles on the National Geographic Voices blog featuring the work of our iLCP Fellow Photographers all around the world. Photos and Text by iLCP Fellow Karen Kasmauski  Cat Lodge, a cancer survivor, moved from Pittsburg to Pennsylvania’s Washington County so that she…

The Powerful Voices of Women at Standing Rock

Women—representing many places, ages, tribes, and other identities—are core to the story of Standing Rock. They run kitchens, start schools, organize supplies, provide healing, and offer wisdom. These are their words.

Winery Owners Fear Fracking Will Poison Tourism

But he’s not giving up on the idea of a permanent ban on fracking in Maryland – and he and Nadine have proven their ability to turn dreams into reality. Alongside their colleagues at Citizen Shale, as well as people across the state who envision a cleaner, more sustainable future for Maryland, it’s safe to bet that they’ll continue and win this fight.

Bahamas Blue Holes 2016: Prehistoric Creatures of the Blue Holes

Blue holes are time capsules that contain some of the most intriguing collections of natural, geologic, and human history in the West Indies. Take a closer look.

Standing Rock Sioux Tribe’s Statement on U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Decision to Not Grant Easement

After months of protest and asking for their concerns over water safety, cultural preservation, and historic treaty rights to be heard, the Standing Rock Sioux are celebrating the U.S. Army’s decision not to grant the current easement to the Dakota Access Pipeline.