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Category archives for Environment

Hair Bands and Giant Trousers: A Lesson in How Little I Know About Bees

This article is brought to you by the International League of Conservation Photographers (iLCP). Read our other articles on the National Geographic Voices blog featuring the work of our iLCP Fellow Photographers all around the world. Text and photos by Clay Bolt, Fellow at the International League of Conservation Photographers. www.claybolt.com / www.beautifulbees.org For months I have been…

Rapa Expedition: Surrounded by Sharks at Last

After days of diving on fairly fishless reefs, the Pristine Seas team gets a thrill encountering large numbers of sharks swarming around soaring coral towers.

Elusive Wolverine Caught on Camera

Nicknamed “the devil bear” for its fierce disposition, wolverines are tenacious predators. Photographing the animal was a mixture of luck and perseverance for photographer Peter Mather, who spent a month trying to capture an image of one in the Canadian Yukon.

Rapa Expedition: Gone Fishin’ … With Rocks

The Hanse Explorer has arrived at Rapa Iti, the site of the latest National Geographic Pristine Seas expedition. In order to understand fishing and food from a local perspective, Expedition Leader Paul Rose elected to go on a fishing trip with Rapa fisherman, and the experience was eye-opening. Fishing in Rapa’s waters is quite a unique experience. Rapa’s clever, traditional…

Pancake Sharks – The Cousins are in Trouble

Reversing overfishing, climate change, and population growth can seem insurmountable. Safina Center Fellows strive to amplify the global conservation discussion and, in targeted ways and places, overcome some of these obstacles. They bring a wide range of skills, engaging in every way from primary research to policy to popular media. They make a difference. Where the rubber…

C40’s Mark Watts: Can Cities Carry the Weight of the World?

Response Magazine, a publication of pre-eminent engineering firm Ramboll, recently included C40 Executive Director Mark Watts in both a feature story and exclusive Q&A. The issue focuses on resource optimization, particularly how city officials and other decision-makers can ensure an approach that will sustain future generations. In an article entitled “Call for Action: Cities Stepping…

Camera Trap Top 10

Adventurers and Scientists for Conservation works with lots of camera traps. They stay immobile, day and night, recording at the slightest hint of movement. Of the hundreds of one-minute camera trap videos we’ve collected, here are some of our favorite moments.

Rapa Expedition: Fish Finding Their Footing

The Pristine Seas Expedition gets its first dive in at Rapa, and brings us photos from beneath the waves of the far-flung island.

Rapa Expedition: An Ancient Secret for Protecting the Future

People have survived for centuries on the tiny island of Rapa, carefully managing their resources through an ancient system known as rahui. What lessons does it hold for the rest of the world today?

Corn Belt Pollution: Louisiana Shrimp And Oysters Pay The Price

By Meg Wilcox Senior Manager, Communications, Ceres The Croatian Pride pushes off the dock and cuts slowly through the grey Gulf of Mexico, its engine growling. The air hangs thick and steamy, and the movement of the 40-foot oyster boat brings relief as it breezes past marshy areas where blue herons stand sentinel. The boat’s…

Industrial-Scale Tiger Farms: Feeding China’s Thirst for Luxury Tiger Products

Young, healthy tigers jump through rings of fire, sit upright on cue, clawing at the air, and perform other well-choreographed circus tricks. Enthusiastic crowds cheer. After the show, some pay extra to hold small, cuddly cubs. But those who visit these tiger attractions in China have no idea of the suffering behind the scenes or the dark commerce that keeps them afloat.

Antarctica 2014: Success at Lewis Bay

Join Ken Sims as he tackles perilous ice-encrusted volcanoes in the attempt to study their geological past in Antarctica.

October 19, 2014: Creating Electricity From Food Waste, Arresting Poachers and More

This week on National Geographic Weekend radio, join host Boyd Matson and his guests as they unearth the habits of the world’s largest-ever carnivore, digest kitchen waste to cook dinner, eat like a 500 year old king, stalk Chernobyl’s ruins, trace tree rings’ roots, write a novel about elephants with a plot twist, kayak to protest dams, prosecute poachers in Mozambique, and see the unseen as a large format film.

Rapa Expedition: Off the Ship, Into the Jungle

With winds so strong the waterfalls were flowing upwards, the Pristine Seas crew lands at Rapa Iti and must hike the final miles to make it to the Island Council meeting for permission to begin the expedition.

CITES and confiscated elephant ivory and rhino horn – to destroy or not destroy?

Over the past 24 months we have seen a number of countries, including Belgium, Chad, China, Hong Kong SAR, China, Czech Republic, Gabon, France, Philippines, and the USA, destroy stockpiles of illegally traded elephant ivory and rhino horn that have been seized and confiscated. I have been invited by national CITES authorities to witness several…