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Category archives for Environment

Seeing a 600-Year-Old Voyaging Canoe Up Close

Having reached New Zealand using the same techniques as their ancestors, modern Polynesian voyagers pay a visit to a fascinating artifact.

The Guardians of Raja Ampat: Driving Conservation in Remote Communities

This article is brought to you by the International League of Conservation Photographers (iLCP). Read our other articles on the National Geographic Voices blog featuring the work of our iLCP Fellow Photographers all around the world. THE GUARDIANS OF RAJA AMPAT FILM AND CONCERT TOUR: Driving Conservation with Grand-Scale Media in Remote Communities Text and Photos by John Weller…

C40 Chair, Rio de Janeiro Mayor Eduardo Paes: “cities have committed actions – now we need funds”

Editor’s Note: 2015 marks the 10-year anniversary of C40 Cities Climate Leadership Group. To celebrate these 10 Years of Results, we will be featuring the voices of C40 principals, partners and other thought leaders throughout the year. I have some very important anniversaries to attend to this year. March 1st marks the 450th anniversary of the…

The Deepwater Horizon Catastrophe 5 Years On

No one missed the Deepwater Horizon disaster. People missed the recent oil spill in Bangladesh. But the world witnessed Deepwater Horizon. Millions of gallons of oil flooded the Gulf of Mexico every day — for 87 days. The biggest accidental oil spill ever. Five years later the effects of the Deepwater Horizon blowout still endure. A new study confirms a massive undersea oil mat near…

What a Family Does for a Year on a Sailboat

A family takes the trip of a lifetime and collects water samples to search for microplastics hidden in the waves.

Becoming One With Winter on the Sun Prairie

There are moments of transcendence you search out, and those that seem to find you. Life on the prairie is full of both.

Montserrat Turns its Focus Toward Ocean Conservation

When you land on Montserrat, your passport gets stamped with a shamrock. That is the first sign that the island has a bit of magic. The air is warm, but the people are warmer. This video introduces some of the faces and vistas of this wondrous place, the second island where the Waitt Institute has…

Cat and Mouse vs. Bird on a Tropical Island

The bird species that have lived on Fernando de Noronha for millions of years have new predators to battle: introduced cats, rats, and a three-foot Brazilian lizard. Can they survive?

Reflecting on the Voyage: Around The Capes

Somewhere between Madagascar and Mozambique, Peace Boat volunteer interpreter Moe Sasaki lost her shadow. For a few hours around midday the Ocean Dream passed directly under the December sun and it was as if Sasaki’s shadow had unstitched itself and run ahead to the African continent on which she grew up. A month later, volunteer…

Waking Up with the Wildlife in Kenya

I peel myself out of bed as the sun peeps up over the horizon. The dogs are stirring and the mere mention of a walk puts them into a frenzy. We head out – the dogs’ noses close to the ground following all of the exciting scents to be found on the Kapiti Plains in…

2015 Ocean Heroes Named

Royalty, a scientist, and a traditional Polynesian navigator are among the winners of the 8th annual Peter Benchley Ocean Awards, named after the late marine conservationist and author of “Jaws.”

Mayors Voices: Boston Mayor Marty Walsh on New Climate Action Plan

The City of Boston has long been a leader on climate action. Since 2005, we’ve been tracking our greenhouse gas emissions, from both municipal operations and the entire city. And we’ve been making great progress. Citywide emissions are down 17 percent, while municipal emissions are down 27 percent since 2005. We are well on our…

World Wildlife Day: How 10 National Geographic Explorers Are Making a Difference

Stressed animals find new habitats, baby animals have a better chance for survival, and the world keeps its natural heritage alive thanks in part to the feats these Explorers perform every day.

March 1, 2015: Photographing a Revolution, Collecting Subway Bacteria and More

This week on National Geographic Weekend, join host Boyd Matson and his guests as they swab New York’s subways for bacteria, plan the perfect surf getaway, photograph a revolution, study the world’s most important fish, meet a glow in the dark shark, leave and return to a beloved homeland, learn the best way to eat a banana, and plan for sea level rise.

6 Ways to Save the Salton Sea and Colorado Delta

By Benny Andrés With scientific modeling foreshadowing megadroughts in the Southwest and Great Plains, it is imperative policymakers implement freshwater projects along the lower Colorado River, in particular, the Salton Sea, a 376-square-mile freshwater agricultural sump in southeastern California, and in the Colorado River Delta where the waterway ends its journey in the Baja California desert.…