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Category archives for Environment

Uncertainties Cloud Forecast For 2016 Hurricane Season

Meteorologists with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration think as many as 16 named tropical storms could form in the Atlantic Basin—which includes the Gulf of Mexico, Caribbean Sea and Atlantic Ocean—during the 2016 hurricane season, which begins June 1. A summer that produced 16 named storms would be well above the dozen storms that…

Industrialization of the oceans: Is it time to dive into the “blue economy”?

Co-authored by Erica Cirino When I was a kid, I spent most of my summer days exploring my local Long Island beach. I’d watch birds, build sand castles and—ever the entrepreneur—would dig up quahog clams to sell, for a quarter each, to my neighbors who lay sunbathing on their beach blankets on the shore. Little…

Director of UN SDSN Jeffrey Sachs: We need “long-term plans” to tackle climate change

Earlier this month, 700 leaders from around the world convened in Washington, D.C. to discuss the future of climate action at the Climate Action 2016 Summit. Global thought leaders – including UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon, UN Secretary-General’s Special Envoy for Cities and Climate Change Michael R. Bloomberg, Former U.S. Vice President Al Gore and French Minister of…

The Race to Find Fish Feeds That Don’t Bankrupt the Ocean

Wild fisheries are stable at best and declining at worst. That means we need aquaculture to meet the world’s growing demand for protein. And to feed the world sustainably, the industry has to figure out how to feed farmed fish without using wild fish stocks. Fish feed stood out in our Fish 2.0 Market Report research as a huge opportunity for innovation. Most farmed fish need some form of prepared feed…

Invasive Ants Eradicated from Tiritiri Island

Ants are often an unwelcome pest species, particularly on islands, and so its great news this week that one of the world’s worst invasive ant species – the Argentine ant, has been successfully eradicated from Tiritiri Island.

Sending our pollution problems down stream

I was planning to travel to St. Martin and Saba for vacation recently. I was excited to go scuba diving again, swim with the turtles, and to once again explore the underwater world that I work to protect. Unfortunately, that plan didn’t take off. Still, I had the days off, so I decided it was…

Something Fishy in Washington, D.C.

By Amy Werner Today is World Fish Migration day, a day best celebrated by raising awareness of the importance of open rivers and migratory fish, exactly what Rock Creek Park did at a 2016 BioBlitz fish identification on May 20.  The urban oasis of Rock Creek Park in Washington D.C., is often viewed as containing only…

How street art can help keep waterways clean and clear of trash

Co-authored by Erica Cirino I’m strolling down Main Street in Northport, a nautical, perhaps quintessential, Long Island village that comes complete with bay views and the scent of sea spray in the air. A friend across the street calls my name just as I’m making the difficult decision of whether or not I should enter…

Lessons on Fish Migration Crucial for Protecting Communities, Livelihoods and Food

By Giulio Boccaletti, Global Managing Director for Water at The Nature Conservancy and Maria Damanaki, Global Managing Director for Oceans at The Nature Conservancy One day in 2014 a female eel set off from Nova Scotia on a long and hazardous journey to her spawning grounds. This was no ordinary eel.  Scientists had released her with…

Killer whales pursuing a dolphin off Central California

By Jodi Frediani, with intro by Carl Safina Killer whales are astonishing creatures, extreme by every measure. I (Carl) wrote extensively about them in my recent book Beyond Words; What Animals Think and Feel. Several non-interbreeding “types” which are actually different species exist (though these are not yet formally recognized with different Latin names). And…

Searching for the Pure Life in Paradise

Costa Rica is one of the world’s most eco-conscious countries, but it still has issues to deal with. How well can it live up to its motto of supporting a “Pura Vida”?

Excuse me, waiter, there’s an invasive species in my soup

Co-authored by Erica Cirino After a full day looking at dinosaur bones, taxidermy birds and hieroglyphs at the Yale Peabody Museum of Natural History, I walked through the streets of New Haven in the rain to into a warm, rustic little Japanese restaurant feeling ravenous, excited and slightly nervous. While my official excuse to travel…

Solar Power: A Winter Journey

Solar power has long been touted as an answer to the energy needs of rural communities living off-grid across the developing world. Over recent years the technology has advanced rapidly in terms of efficiency and price, finally making it a genuinely viable option, at household level at least. For the very same reasons – including a…

Minnesota: An Ocean Protection Ally

By Annie Reisewitz Minnesota might not be the first state that comes to mind where you think of sandy beaches, but the home of 10,000 lakes has more shoreline than California, Florida and Hawaii combined. And a bill introduced this year in the state legislature could help make headway protecting ocean waters downstream from the…

Journey Into Te Bangabanga: The Sacred Caves of Banaba Island

The morning was still dark when the young men arrived with their machetes and flashlights. We were on one of the most remote islands in the world, about to venture into an underground network of sacred caves known as te bangabanga. The land below the surface of Banaba, a Pacific island nearly 200 miles from…