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Category archives for Climate Change

Holding the Cosmos in Our Hands

“The seed comes from the tree, the tree comes from the seed. It’s like the chicken and the egg. If people want to understand it, they will break the seed apart — they will actually kill it — to see the cells, the chromosomes and the genetics. There is another way to look at this. I plant a seed and a miracle happens — something new is born out of this carbohydrate and protein, a new life is born. This is a miracle, you see? The miracle of life.”

So You Want to Fly Drones for Conservation?

The latest in the Drones and Small Unmanned Aerial Systems Special Series, in which Kike profiles interesting information, research and thoughts on using drones, UAVs and remotely piloted vehicles for journalism and photography. In the recent past, drones have exploded into the public eye. A subject of constant controversy, they summon debates about personal privacy, the dynamics of political…

Crops Rising from a Cracked Desert

By Nexus Media, with Michael Kotutwa Johnson Michael Kotutwa Johnson is an environmental policy expert in the School of Natural Resources and the Environment at the University of Arizona. He is also a Hopi dryland farmer. He sat down with Nexus Media to share centuries-old techniques for growing food on an unforgiving landscape. This interview…

Resource Extraction and American Indians: The Invisible History of America

The recent American Indian protests at Standing Rock in North Dakota, protesting environmentally irresponsible and culturally damaging resource extraction, encouraged me to reach out to my American Indian friends.  The blood of the Cherokee Nation flows in the veins of my own family members.  I wanted to draw out their stories and to report on…

Nature Is Making a Comeback. It’s Time to Celebrate.

Legendary conservation biologist Tom Lovejoy shares his thoughts on the progress we’ve made in protecting the wild, and the reasons for continued hope as the Smithsonian’s Earth Optimism Summit gets under way.

Meet the North: Crossing that Bridge

On the way out of town, Dennis Sinnok saw fresh marks on the snow, stopped his snowmobile, and asked, “Do you want to go track a wolverine?” We said yes, but since we were no match for his driving skills, we immediately fell way, way behind. As an outsider to the north, it was my…

A Fisherman’s Son Who Cannot Swim

Mayur, a young Koli fisherman’s son, never learned to swim because the beaches of Mumbai are too polluted. Few Koli youth want to follow their parent’s footsteps to be fishermen in Mumbai. The consumer demand for fish though is ever on the rise. Mayur teaches me to dig for clams and offers his perspective on Koli culture among shifting tides.

A Wave of Ocean Activism to hit D.C.

Blue activists from sea to shining sea are coming to D.C. to fight President Trump’s anti-ocean budget cuts and other threats to our public waters. The biennial 6th Blue Vision Summit launches on Tuesday May 9. But this year is different. This will be the first large gathering of the ocean community since the 2016…

Explorers Take to the Skies to See Greenland Like Never Before

“Usually if it’s been done, I’m not too interested in it.”

That’s according to National Geographic grantee Eddie Kisfaludy, a marine biologist, pilot, and extreme data collector. And that’s how he found himself flying a tiny helicopter 8,000 miles over some of the most remote regions on Earth, including Greenland’s most epic landscapes.

Trump’s New Executive Order Will Worsen Hunger in Africa

Subsistence farmers stand to be among the biggest losers from the president’s dismantling of Barack Obama’s climate change legacy. On Tuesday, President Donald Trump took his most concrete step thus far to unravel his predecessor’s legacy on climate change, with a wide-ranging executive order that dismantles several Obama-era policies to restrict greenhouse gas pollution. The…

1Frame4Nature | Esther Horvath

The mission aboard the 1942 DC3 aircraft is aimed at measuring ice thickness and changes in the Arctic Ocean. Lead scientist, Dr. Thomas Krumpen, has been overseeing the campaign called TIFAX since 2010, covering the same polar region, including Fram Streight and above Northern Greenland towards Nord Pole each year in July -August. During the three weeks campaign in 2016, the team flew a total of fifty hours during 10 survey flights, surveying 2300 miles/3700 km of ice surface. Findings from the campaign revealed surprisingly low summer ice thickness measurements. Since 2010, the Arctic summer ice thickness has reduced by 42%, presumably due to both rising atmospheric and sea temperatures.

Top 25 Wild Bird Photographs of the Week #80

Hello, and welcome to the 80th edition of “Top 25 Wild Bird Photographs of the Week”! Since reviving the blog earlier this year we have been overwhelmed by the influx of incredible photo entries we are receiving on the Facebook page. We are thrilled to see that many of the entries are coming from photographers…

Living Shoreline Initiatives Aim to Stem Erosion at the GTM NERR

As part of an ongoing project, Erika Zambello is visiting all National Estuarine Research Reserves in the continental United States. Established by NOAA, the sites work together toward long-term research, education and coastal stewardship. A group of scientists attending a Jacksonville-based living shorelines conference, garbed in knee-high wading boots, walked across a mudflat toward a…

Drone Captures Leatherback Sea Turtle Returning to Ocean, Swimming Away

By Jenell Black and Christian Díaz Chuquisengo This year, as Field Manager at The Leatherback Trust, I was lucky enough to witness an extraordinary event in Las Baulas National Park (Parque Nacional Marino Las Baulas) on Costa Rica’s Pacific coast. Leatherbacks typically nest under the cover of darkness, but once in a rare while our…

World Water Day: Six Trends for Optimism

By Brooke Barton Senior Program Director, Water & Food Programs, Ceres More than half a billion people today lack access to clean water, and with climate change, water pollution and booming population growth, pressures on limited water supplies are ratcheting up. Tackling the water crisis can feel like an uphill battle in the United States, with one…