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Category archives for Conservation

Hawiian Coastal Plastic Cleanup by Young People

Optimism versus pessimism, how do we find balance between the two when confronting the environmental challenges of today? The older generation has many opportunities to help young people to be optimistic about the future — by encouraging them to take action.  The sea offers us inspiration to act (it is la mere in French, our…

Wake Up, This Is Your Kea Alarm

Easter provided an opportunity to hike in the mountainous Southern Alps of New Zealand and to seek out some of the less common birds of New Zealand. We were not disappointed with sightings of some of the endemic residents of the mountains such as rock wren and kea.

Diving for Coral Conservation: Chichiriviche Hope Spot

The town of Chichiriviche de la Costa is a small gem on the Venezuelan coastline, set in a tranquil bay where a freshwater river runs through the mountains and empties into the sea. The locals live in the hills just above the beach, consisting of a few hundred people whose income is derived from fishing and local tourism…

1Frame4Nature | Clay Bolt

Throughout my life, I’ve occasionally felt a déjà vu kind of love for certain people, places, and things that I’ve never actually encountered before. Let’s call them les déjà aimés or the already loved. There have been quite a few of these special first-encounters throughout my life: the first eastern box turtle that ever crossed my path; the tadpole filled pond in the woods behind my grandfather’s house; and the blue swell of the Southern Blue Ridge. When I laid my eyes upon a rusty-patched bumble bee for the first time, that old familiar feeling presented itself once again, immediately filling me with a deep surge of compassion for this little bee with an oxidized, orange kiss of color.

Nature Is Making a Comeback. It’s Time to Celebrate.

Legendary conservation biologist Tom Lovejoy shares his thoughts on the progress we’ve made in protecting the wild, and the reasons for continued hope as the Smithsonian’s Earth Optimism Summit gets under way.

Top 25 Wild Bird Photographs of the Week #84

Yet another week of 2017 has flown by and with that comes our Friday treat – The Top 25 Wild Bird Photographs of the Week #84! Thank you to all the bird lovers and photographers across the globe who have contributed so wonderfully to this movement. You and your beautiful photographs are what drive the…

The Search for Lost Species

Global Wildlife Conservation today embarks on the first phase of the Search for Lost Species, the largest-ever global quest to find and protect species that have not been seen in the wild in decades. The campaign will work with local partners to send scientific expeditions around the world to some of the most remote and…

Help Save the World’s Most Endangered Marine Mammal

Did you know scientists estimate there are only 30 vaquita porpoises left in the world making them the most critically endangered marine mammal on Earth? The rare and tiny 100-pound, 5-foot long, toothed whale only lives in the northern pocket of the Gulf of California, Mexico, having the most restricted range of any cetacean. Due…

1Frame4Nature | Chris Linder

I have spent the last 15 years documenting science fieldwork with my camera. I have followed researchers over glaciers and down rivers and through swamps and across oceans. I have shared freeze-dried dinners with them in wet tents in Alaska, celebrated birthdays aboard zodiacs in Antarctica, and swatted countless mosquitoes with them in Siberia.

Kayaking Within Rookery Bay Mangroves

As part of an ongoing project, Erika Zambello is visiting all National Estuarine Research Reserves in the continental United States. Established by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), the sites work together toward long-term research, education and coastal stewardship. A group of intrepid adventurers and I met at exactly 9 a.m. at the end…

Top 25 Wild Bird Photographs of the Week #83

The Wild Bird Trust is proud to present the 83rd edition of the “Top 25 Wild Bird Photographs of the Week”. Each week we are overwhelmed by the quantity and calibre of photographs we receive from photographers from around the world. This makes the job of selecting the Top 25 as difficult as it is…

A Fisherman’s Son Who Cannot Swim

Mayur, a young Koli fisherman’s son, never learned to swim because the beaches of Mumbai are too polluted. Few Koli youth want to follow their parent’s footsteps to be fishermen in Mumbai. The consumer demand for fish though is ever on the rise. Mayur teaches me to dig for clams and offers his perspective on Koli culture among shifting tides.

Oysters Built the East Coast. Now Entrepreneurs are Rebuilding the Oysters.

The East Coast was literally built on oysters. At the peak of their production as a food source, these shellfish were so plentiful from the Gulf Coast to New England that discarded shells were crushed and used to pave roads. Oysters kept bays and waterways clean—Chesapeake Bay residents didn’t need to treat or filter their…

Earth Optimism Summit: Enough Doom and Gloom About Nature

There are success stories that should give us hope, from reforestation projects to marine reserves. I invite you to join us for this event, one of the first ever to focus exclusively on conservation success.

Side Gig: Canopy Tour Guide

One of the many safety precautions I take in my work is to never climb alone. Sometimes that just means bringing someone else into the forest to hang out on the ground while I battle the ropes, branches, string, ants, and any number of other hazards above. Whenever possible, however, I like to bring people…