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Category archives for Environment

World Lion Day: What Would You Do to Protect Lions?

After cordially being invited to “pen a post” for National Geographic’s Cat Watch in honor of World Lion Day #worldlionday, I was elated; not only because I was asked, but, and in spite of this being quite the cliché, I absolutely, unequivocally love lions! Given the number of conservation issues surrounding the animal kingdom’s noblest of big cats, the…

How do humpback whales locate food? Scientists need your help to find out

Co-authored by Erica Cirino Interested in supporting scientists who study how whales use their ears to find food in the noisy New York Harbor? If so, read on. When sharks want something to snack on, they rely on their excellent sense of smell. When swordfish want a meal, they use their eyes. When dolphins need…

Icelandic cod: carrying the torch for sustainable seafood at the 2016 Rio Olympic Games

The Olympic and Paralympic Games present a great opportunity to forge positive links between sport and the environment. This year, as part of a commitment to sustainability, 100% of the cod served to athletes in the Olympic and Paralympic Village comes from Visir, a family-run fishing business in Grindavik, south west Iceland.

What Drives a California Woman to Save Starving Sea Lions? The answer may help scientists save our seas.

The emaciated seven-month-old sea lion pup was cowering in the bushes along the coast north of San Francisco in a driving, cold rain when Sue Hawley gingerly approached. Hawley put on gloves, grabbed a towel, tiptoed toward the brush, and reached in to pull out the scared animal. As she gripped firmly under its flippers,…

Solitary Is Not Asocial: Social Interactions Among Mountain Lions

On May 5, 2012, the way I—and many other scientists—understood mountain lions changed forever. A few days earlier, data collected from F57, an adult female mountain lion we’d captured as part of Panthera’s Teton Cougar Project just the month before, revealed that she’d been in the same place for two full days, behavior typically indicative…

Mayor of London, Sadiq Khan on his climate change priorities

Climate change is one of the biggest, if not the biggest, risk to London.  I want to put our city at the leading edge of the fight against this risk. But London can’t take on this challenge alone. That’s why I have joined forces with leaders of world cities to find ways that we can…

Photo Update: How Technology is Reaching Pakistan’s Children with the Polio Vaccine

In our February story – Cell Coverage: Reaching Pakistan’s Children with the Polio Vaccine – Aziz Memon wrote about Rotary‘s work to replace traditional paper reporting of polio, maternal and newborn health data in Pakistan with more accurate and timely mobile phone-based reporting. This new program is being implemented almost entirely by female health workers, many working…

Why Research Matters to Mountain Lions in Wyoming

Mountain lions live like shadows around us, and most people have never seen one. Most never will. Yet on July 8, the Wyoming Game Commission granted these wraiths of forests and mountains a reprieve in several parts of the state, including Unit 2 in the northwest where Panthera’s Teton Cougar Project (TCP) operates. Unit 2…

Million Dollar Sharks

I recently got back from diving in the island nation of Palau and its shark enhanced waters.   That’s right, not shark infested- shark enhanced. Sharks are to Palau what Orcas are to SeaWorld only their shark tank is the Pacific Ocean that they’re free to roam in. An economic analysis carried out by the Australian…

Cryptic Cannibals: Sea Slugs in the Bahamas

The following is a blog post by Carolyn Belak, sea slug enthusiast and scientific aid at the California Department of Fish and Wildlife, and Andy Kough, postdoctoral research associate at Shedd Aquarium. When one thinks of the Bahamas, they probably picture miles of white sandy beaches, dolphins dancing through crystal blue waters and colorful fish…

Two Arizona Vineyards Give Back to a River through a Voluntary Water Exchange

In an effort to stem the depletion of groundwater and keep Arizona’s prized Verde River flowing, two vineyards are buying water credits through a new exchange designed to balance the basin’s water use for the good of the river and the local economy. Launched last week by the not-for-profit Friends of Verde River Greenway, the…

An update from Woods Hole Science Aquarium: I’m halfway through my internship, and it’s been awesome!

By Jessica Perelman It has been five weeks since I began working as a NOAA intern at the Woods Hole Science Aquarium (WHSA), and what an amazing experience it has been! As I expected, this summer is presenting me with every opportunity to learn about animal husbandry, interact with aquarium visitors, and discover all that…

Canada oks use of Corexit for oil spills—despite what we’ve learned in the Gulf

Co-authored by Erica Cirino After Shell Oil’s Brutus oil well platform 90 miles south of the Louisiana coast spewed more than 88,000 gallons of crude oil into the Gulf of Mexico this May, Shell contracted Clean Gulf Associates and Marine Spill Response Corporation to clean up its mess. The two companies deployed workers in boats…

Pride in Our Prides – Saving Lions with Livestock Kraals

Post submitted by Florian J Weise Lions and people live a tenuous coexistence. Where their activities overlap problems are inevitable. The consequence often is fatal; sometimes for the people involved, more frequently so for the lions. In retaliation of attacks on humans or livestock, people resort to drastic measures including poisoning. Along the northern edge…

Colombia’s Former Guerrillas Need New Jobs. Why Not in Conservation?

Painted flowers of pink and blue grace the nails of two slender hands posed on the trigger and barrel of an assault weapon. Behind the weapon, a hot pink t-shirt serves as backdrop. There is nothing else in the frame. From the moment that I saw this photo last month in The California Sunday Magazine,…