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Category archives for Environment

Could a Partnership Born of Fish 2.0 Become the Red Bull of Seafood?

There’s a global divide at the heart of the seafood industry: the businesses that most need new technologies are often continents away from the businesses creating them. Small-scale seafood operations in Asia, Latin America, and Africa catch and farm most of the seafood we eat. Startups in the U.S., Canada, and Europe are developing most…

Top 10 Ocean Conservation Victories of 2016

From wars, to politics, to the deaths of eminent artists, 2016 was a year many people were eager to see end. It was also another record breaking year for the dangerous warming of our planet. Yet, despite that thick layer of doom, humanity came together in inspiring ways – for water protection, for refugees, for…

Ancient Deep Sea Corals Need Protection From Modern Threats

For 90 minutes, Sandra Brooke sat in the chilly darkness of a titanium sphere as she dropped more than 8,000 feet into the Pacific Ocean off Costa Rica. When she and another scientist in the small submarine reached the bottom, where two of the Earth’s tectonic plates meet, their onboard pilot flipped on the outside…

A Man Among Wolves: Photographing Yellowstone’s Iconic Predators

What would you do to be a National Geographic photographer? Would you trudge across a snowy volcano with a hundred pounds of gear thrown over your shoulder? Would you trek by yourself across a giant river oft visited by grizzly bears? Would you stake out in the dark wilderness with the howls of wolves getting closer and closer? Conservation photographer Ronan Donovan did all that and more for a year and a half to photograph Yellowstone National Park and the wolves that call it home.

High tech solutions to invasive mammal pests

This year the Biological Heritage National Science Challenge in New Zealand launches its project on high tech solutions to invasive mammal pests, hosted by the University of Auckland. The high tech solutions project aims to deliver the long-term science solutions which will become a part of Predator Free New Zealand. In July 2016 the New…

A National Geographic Explorer Seeks Blue Tang

When popular movies come out, especially those made by Disney, most people extol the brilliant animation, the clever storylines, the box office blowouts. However, conservationists sometimes ask another question: How will this film affect the environment? When Finding Nemo and Finding Dory emerged as instant Pixar classics, Shannon Switzer Swanson and her team — recipients…

Obama calls for a chilling on drilling in the Arctic

What President Obama’s decision on oil and gas leases in the Arctic means for life on Earth.

Conservation Requires Collaboration

By George Shillinger, PhD One of the most exciting moments for me in 2016 was President Obama’s decision to expand the Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument. With 582,578 square miles off the coast of Hawaii designated for permanent protection, the U.S. created the world’s largest protected area, hosting more than 7,000 marine species, many of which…

With New Fish Rule, NOAA Lets the Big One Get Away

When you take your car in for a tuneup, do you have only the spark plugs examined? Of course not. You ask the mechanic to look at the whole vehicle—the engine, fluids, fuel system, and the many other parts that must work together for your car to run smoothly. That same comprehensive approach can help…

The Human Cost of Energy Development

This article is brought to you by the International League of Conservation Photographers (iLCP). Read our other articles on the National Geographic Voices blog featuring the work of our iLCP Fellow Photographers all around the world. Photos and Text by iLCP Fellow Karen Kasmauski  Cat Lodge, a cancer survivor, moved from Pittsburg to Pennsylvania’s Washington County so that she…

Happy Anniversary, Photo Ark! 10 Years, 6,300 Animals Photographed

Photographing every one of the 12,000 animal species under human care is Joel Sartore’s dream. And now he’s been living that dream for 10 full years.

Year-End Honors for Our Cutting-Edge Explorers

2016 has been an incredible year for exploration, research, and conservation—and explorers supported by the National Geographic Society have been at the top of each of those fields.

New Research Buoy Installed on Lake Tanganyika

An international research team partnering with a local fisheries research institute installed a research buoy in Tanzanian waters on Lake Tanganyika earlier this month. It is the first of its kind on the African continent, marking a major milestone in both local and global research to understand the role and response of lakes to climate…

The Powerful Voices of Women at Standing Rock

Women—representing many places, ages, tribes, and other identities—are core to the story of Standing Rock. They run kitchens, start schools, organize supplies, provide healing, and offer wisdom. These are their words.

Hokulea’s Worldwide Voyage Leg 25: Virginia to Florida

With ice on the deck of the canoe in the morning during our first weekend, we began our 1,110-mile journey to the Sunshine State.