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Category archives for Environment

Nile River Nations Agree to Cooperate, but Danger Lurks for One of Planet’s Great Wetlands

Earlier this month, the foreign ministers of Sudan, Egypt and Ethiopia reached agreement on basic principles for managing what will be Africa’s largest hydroelectric dam, which is now under construction on the Blue Nile near the Ethiopian-Sudanese border. While the unilateral building of big dams is often a trigger for conflict in international river basins,…

Tropical island conservation: Rat eradication for species recovery

Having just returned from Fernando de Noronha the plight of tropical islands under attack from invasive species is still at the forefront of my thoughts. Can the techniques we have developed in temperate latitudes on uninhabited islands be applied so readily to inhabited tropical islands? This was exactly the question that was asked in 2013…

Warming Lakes: New Global Database Sets the Stage for Research on the Ecological Effects of Climate Change

Global assessments based on satellite data have found that the world’s largest lakes have steadily warmed in the last 25 years, and some lakes are warming more rapidly than air temperature. I wrote about this in an earlier post, noting that studies of individual lakes, using temperature data gathered in the traditional way, confirmed these…

Pitcairn Islands Become World’s Largest Single Marine Reserve

Relive the adventures and stunning photos of the expedition behind the announcement of the world’s largest contiguous marine protected area.

Madagascar in the Season of Lightning

The rain patters on outside my window, but there is something magical and mysterious about Madagascar that makes me as happy as I have ever been.

Communities Leading the Way to Save Madagascar’s Mangroves

“About three years ago I noticed that the high tides were coming up into my rice fields, and taking the soil away with them. I’d never seen that before,” Philippe, a rice farmer from the village of Ambalahonko, tells me from under his wide-brimmed straw hat; something my fair-skinned and fine-haired self, unfortunately, did not…

St. Patrick’s Day Time Warp: Ireland Before St. Patrick

No farms, no sheep, no grassy hills—no pubs. This is Ireland at the dawn of the Stone Age.

Tune in: LIVE Twitter Chat With Explorer Paul Rose

Tweet your questions about ocean conservation @Paul_Rose using #NatGeoLive and join us Thursday, March 19th at 10 a.m. ET!

C40 Launches City Climate Change Hazard Taxonomy for Public Comment

Today, at the UNISDR World Conference on Disaster Risk Reduction, C40 officially launched for public comment the City Climate Hazard Taxonomy, a structured description of the key climate hazards that cities are facing. The Taxonomy was developed by C40 and ARUP with funding from Bloomberg Philanthropies. Cities are key actors in building climate resilience because…

Messing Around in Boats in Quest of Endangered Trees

“Believe me my young friend, There is nothing absolutely nothing worth half so much doing as simply messing about in boats.” Kenneth Graham, Wind in the Willows Our team is waiting, while someone else is doing the messing about with our boat, and it does not half feel worth it. Our team of botanists, ecologists,wildlife…

Our Plastic Ocean

The world’s oceans are overflowing with plastic. Every year, around eight millions tons of plastic is unceremoniously dumped into our oceans (Lauren Parker, National Geographic, 2015). Plastic is an everyday part of life on earth, and I challenge you to spend a day where you don’t encounter it. It’s in our face washes and our…

Lessons from São Paulo’s Water Shortage

It’s getting harder and harder to separate nature’s role in disasters from our own, and the dire water predicament confronting São Paulo, Brazil, is no exception. But as with the ongoing drought in California, there are important lessons from São Paulo’s grim situation that can help us prepare for the “new normal” that’s unfolding. It’s…

Journeying Oregon’s New Marine Reserves by Bike: Cape Perpetua

By Chris Rurik and Helen Helfand Part 1   Part 2   Part 3   Part 4   Part 5 High on the shoulder of Cape Perpetua, a worn path leads to an open stone shelter. The shelter clutches to the mountainside like a hawk’s nest. It looks ancient though it’s not a century old;…

C40 Membership Grows to 75 Global Cities

C40 is pleased to welcome Amman, Durban, Jaipur, Quito, and Salvador to its global network of cities committed to tackling climate change and increasing urban resilience. These five cities bring C40’s overall membership to 75 cities, a key milestone in the organisation’s expansion efforts and a testament to the success of city-to-city collaboration on climate…

March 8, 2015: Bee Stings, Tiger Farms, Deadly Sugarcane and More

This week on National Geographic Weekend, join host Boyd Matson and his guests as they survive moose and cold temperatures to win the Yukon Quest, live in the wilderness for 8 months with moth-eating bears, photograph bees, learn about Mayan achievements, investigate China’s tiger farms, understand Nicaragua’s sugarcane worker health crisis, study the sunset’s colors, myth-bust “clean coal”.