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Category archives for Environment

Gallopin’ Gargoyles! New Stone-Like Frog Species Discovered

The discovery of the stone leaf-litter frog is just the tip of the iceberg when it comes to the unknown biodiversity of these forests. It’s a race against time to discover the creatures that live in these mysterious forests and to ensure that they still have their forest homes in the future.

Side Gig: Canopy Tour Guide

One of the many safety precautions I take in my work is to never climb alone. Sometimes that just means bringing someone else into the forest to hang out on the ground while I battle the ropes, branches, string, ants, and any number of other hazards above. Whenever possible, however, I like to bring people…

1Frame4Nature | Gabby Salazar

After working as a photographer for over five years, I recently returned to school to study Conservation Science as a postgraduate student. It has been a challenge to exchange my camera for books and my mornings in the field for mornings in a lecture hall. But, mostly, it has been difficult to learn about the many challenges facing the natural world – from the mass extinction of frogs to the growing illegal wildlife trade. Thankfully, my professors have also focused on exposing me to solutions and to innovative new approaches to conservation. So, as I finish my degree this summer, I remain optimistic about the future – a future where I believe that both humans and nature can and will thrive.

A Wave of Ocean Activism to hit D.C.

Blue activists from sea to shining sea are coming to D.C. to fight President Trump’s anti-ocean budget cuts and other threats to our public waters. The biennial 6th Blue Vision Summit launches on Tuesday May 9. But this year is different. This will be the first large gathering of the ocean community since the 2016…

Latest Okavango Wilderness Project Expedition About to Kick Off

When they put the sticker on the Land Cruiser, you know things are about to get good.

Searching for Water in the World’s Biggest Refugee Crisis

The story behind a short documentary on the lives of South Sudanese refugees in Uganda. Can Africa’s greatest river provide relief to the world’s biggest refugee crisis? I went to northern Uganda to find out, and encountered a story of desperation and perseverance that opened my eyes and broke my heart. I’ll never look at a glass of water…

Dolphin Feeding Techniques: How to Eat an Octopus When you Don’t Have Hands

What do predators do when the prey is too big to be swallowed whole? It really depends on the size, texture and shape of the targeted victim, but, generally speaking, it goes through some form of “processing” before being consumed.

CSU Forecasters See Signs of Below-Average Hurricane Season

Meteorologists at Colorado State University think an unusual El Niño event later this year could keep the 2017 Atlantic Basin hurricane season a little quieter than usual. CSU’s preseason forecast for the coming summer suggests that 11 named tropical storms will form in the Caribbean Sea, Gulf of Mexico and Atlantic Ocean between June 1…

Top 25 Wild Bird Photographs of the Week #82

Here it is folks, the 82nd “Top 25 Wild Bird Photographs of the Week”! The Wild Bird! Revolution team would like to thank all of you for submitting your photographs to the campaign. It is so heartening to see how much time, effort and love goes into observing and capturing the wonderful world of birds.…

Shark attack survivor says people should respect, not fear, the seas

Brian Correiar, a California-based diving master and certified diver for more than 18 years, says he’s always been more comfortable in water than on land. His sense of ease in the seas was seriously shaken on Saturday, March 18, 2017, when a great white shark attacked the 14-foot, single-person ocean kayak he was paddling in through Monterey Bay.

Explorers Take to the Skies to See Greenland Like Never Before

“Usually if it’s been done, I’m not too interested in it.”

That’s according to National Geographic grantee Eddie Kisfaludy, a marine biologist, pilot, and extreme data collector. And that’s how he found himself flying a tiny helicopter 8,000 miles over some of the most remote regions on Earth, including Greenland’s most epic landscapes.

Is Your Sunscreen Hurting Oysters? Probably.

By Erika Zambello, based on an article by Madison Toonder. Though still in high school, Madison Toonder is passionate about science, and recently used the scientific method to study oysters in the coastal environment near her Florida home. “I discovered the importance of conservation at a young age,” she wrote in a new article for Voices…

China bans ivory, prices plummet. Will this really help save the elephants?

The price of ivory in China has dropped by 2/3 since 2014. Can that help save living elephants?

Solar Power Works Even When the Sun Doesn’t Shine… Batteries Are a Game-Changer

By Lynn Scarlett, Global Managing Director for Public Policy, The Nature Conservancy Dr. Robert Ballard, the celebrated explorer most famous for discovering the wreckage of the Titanic, lives for the moments when something critical he thinks he knows about the world is shown to be wrong—like the day he and his team went in the…

Vatika Bay Hope Spot: Submerged Ancient Grecian City Abuts Marine Abundance

Vatika Bay and the Myrtoon Sea in Greece may boast clear blue waters, white sandy beaches and iconic mountainous ridges, but what makes the Hope Spot truly special is intersection of nature and culture. Iconic species including whales and dolphins, loggerhead turtles, monk seals, and fan clams swim near a spectacular underwater archeological site called Pavlopetri. Located in the western…