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Category archives for Science

Rock Art Helps Reveal Elk May Have Roamed Los Angeles

What if Los Angeles’ largest native herbivore already went extinct and we had no idea? What if long-dead native people were the ones who could set the record straight? Last year I was in the field  researching California’s native Chumash culture and rock art through the help of a National Geographic Young Explorers Grant. Not far from…

Fishing for Our Future With Lures From the Past

Nahaku Kalei explains more about sustainable fish-eating and the data being gathered by the Worldwide Voyage.

Creating a Language by Committee

On the white board, nine words in Khmer are listed in blue. In the cool, dim room, members of the Cambodian Sign Language committee are seated at an oval conference table scattered with the various implements essential to their work—iced coffee sweetened by condensed milk, a Khmer-English dictionary, pencils and paper. Papers ruffle on the table as a breeze surges through the barred window, slightly swinging the heavy green shutters. Over the next three hours, the committee will invent four new signs.

November 16, 2014: Speed Climb 3,000 Foot Walls, Meet the Darwin of NYC’s Rodent World and More

This week on National Geographic Weekend, join host Boyd Matson and his guests as they set a speed record on El Capitan, prosecute poaching kingpins, share survival tips for extreme weather, dig up clues on ancient tsunamis to study for future risk, hold our breath to survive a surfing disaster, call the Malagasy military for an airlift, understand the evolution of New York’s rats, and mourn the Sherpa guides and porters lost on Everest.

TODAY: Chat With National Geographic Explorer Enric Sala

Do you ever wonder what it’s like to be a National Geographic Explorer? Here’s your chance to connect directly with someone who has ventured to unexplored areas, discovered previously unknown life forms, taken stunning photographs, and put it all to work to help protect some of the last wild places on Earth. From the Russian Arctic to…

The Flying Classroom Comes to Palau

Barrington Irving brings the Flying Classroom to Palau to dive its magnificent waters… and harvest water snake venom!

The Skeletons of Olmos, Part II: Racing Against the Storm

The ancient skeletons of Olmos don’t give up their secrets easily, and with both a construction project and El Niño threatening to destroy them, time is of the essence!

Hard-Working Hands Span Cultures and Generations to Come Together for Big Cat Conservation

Education is the foundation for positive change, and every year the National Geographic Student Expeditions takes groups of high school students from around the world to beautiful places on quests for both knowledge and skills. The trips also serve as a way to help various developing communities, and this year two groups of students made…

Rainforest Blessings and Curses in Rural Madagascar

The long nights in Madagascar give Cara Brook time to reflect on how different her world is from the one she’s visiting and studying.

Gabon Announces Protection of 23 Percent of Its Waters

The announcement by President Ali Bongo Ondimba of Gabon means that whales, sharks, turtles, rays, and countless other marine species in jeopardy from industrialization and overfishing will now have a blue haven on the West African coast.

The Peel River Watershed: The Endangered Wilderness of Canada’s Yukon

This article is brought to you by the International League of Conservation Photographers (iLCP). Read our other articles on the National Geographic Voices blog featuring the work of our iLCP Fellow Photographers all around the world. Text and photos by Peter Mather, Fellow at the International League of Conservation Photographers. From the front seat of our Cessna 172, the…

Tetiaroa Society – The Brando

For the past five years I have worked on Tetiaroa atoll in French Polynesia – famous as the island hideaway of Marlon Brando. This week I was invited to the inaugural meeting of the Scientific Advisory Board of the Tetiaroa Society – a not for profit organisation established to oversee the conservation and sustainable use…

Russia’s River Villages: An Icy Grave

Join Jon Waterhouse as he and his team trek to eastern Russia to bring the Network of Indigenous Knowledge (NIK) and its water tests to the peoples of Yakutia in this multi-part series. In a brief stopover, the team descends into the ice of Russia’s Permafrost Institute.

November 9, 2014: Rescue Storm Survivors from Everest, Test an Elephant’s Memory and More

This week on National Geographic Weekend radio, join host Boyd Matson and his guests as they save climbers from a disaster on Everest, devote one day of each week to helping others, take selfies with orangutans, assign land and oceans for protection, never forget elephants, travel through North Korea, go to war with chimpanzees, and hijack the minds of the animals they’re living inside.

Russia’s River Villages: A Tale of Two Countries

Join Jon Waterhouse as he and his team trek to eastern Russia to bring the Network of Indigenous Knowledge (NIK) and its water tests to the peoples of Yakutia in this multi-part series. As the team lands in Russia, the atmosphere surprises them.