VOICES Voices Icon Ideas and Insight From Explorers

Menu

Category archives for Science

Fantastic Beasts and Where to Mend Them

Even blue-throated macaws and radiated tortoises sometimes need a doctor. Veterinarian Laurie Hess catalogued her decades spent treating unusual creatures in her new book Unlikely Companions: The Adventures of an Exotic Animal Doctor. Recently, she spoke with Nexus Media about exotic animals — which to adopt, which to avoid and which are most threatened by humans. This…

America’s coastal communities need a strong EPA leader, not Pruitt

It’s really quite simple. As the ocean absorbs more carbon emissions from the atmosphere, our ocean becomes more acidic. And the impacts are far-reaching. Just ask the shellfish growers and coastal businesses in the Pacific Northwest and across our country. Yet Scott Pruitt, the Trump administration nominee to lead the Environmental Protection Agency, avoids acknowledging…

A Firsthand Account of Indonesian Plastic Pollution

Adventure Scientists’ Microplastics Principal Investigator Abby Barrows gives her firsthand account from her voyage from Bali to Komodo on an Oceanic Society Expedition to explore the impact of plastic pollution in that region.

Reserva Monte Mojino: Conservation on the Slopes of the Sierra Madre

A cactus flower blooming next to a lush fig tree, a desert tortoise resting beneath an elegant trogon perched in a mesquite: I first encountered these strange bedfellows when I visited the forest near Alamos in Sonora, Mexico, during the summer monsoon. It is here, along the slopes of the Sierra Madre Occidental, that one…

Two Days at the Apalachicola National Estuarine Research Reserve

As part of an ongoing project, Erika Zambello is visiting all National Estuarine Research Reserves in the continental United States. Established by NOAA, the sites work together toward long-term research, education and coastal stewardship. Located on the Florida Panhandle, the Apalachicola National Estuarine Research Reserve (ANERR) borders encompass over 245,000 acres, including Apalachicola Bay, wildlife…

Innovating to Fight Epidemics: Latest Ideas from TEDMED

At a time where emerging and rapidly spreading infections such as the Ebola and Zika viruses have been dominating conversations in global health, this is a defining moment for innovators – and new and exciting thinking in healthcare is always the hallmark of the annual TEDMED event. In this installment of Digital Diversity, Layla McCay – a member…

The Real-Life Bone Collector: Recovering an Extinct Human Ancestor

Watch the real-life “bone collector” in action. Biological anthropologist and National Geographic Emerging Explorer Marina Elliott ventured a hundred feet deep into an ancient cave, at times squeezing through passages only eight inches wide, to recover the remains of what turned out to be a newly discovered, extinct human ancestor.

Forests Are Worthless Until Cut Down

Dasho Neten remembers a time when “people simply acted on their values informally,” while now the general sense of citizenship wanes. As a farmer and prominent activist in Bhutan, Dasho Neten challenges us not to depend on the government to build our societies. “We need to wake up! There is an inconvenient truth lingering, and we need to ask: are we really moving towards self-reliance? Sometimes we need reminders, no matter how uncomfortable they may be.”

Securing a Bold, Blue, and Prosperous Future for Our Ocean

The ocean is powerful, but not invincible. It is rich, but not inexhaustible.

Race for Water launches its second Odyssey

After the first shocking findings – that a global clean-up of the oceans was now unrealistic – during the Race for Water Odyssey completed in 2015, Race for Water is mobilizing again and launching a second expedition focused on a five-year program (2017 -2021). The new Odyssey will take place on board a unique vessel:…

Breeding Ground of the Mascarene Petrel Discovered

Pétrel noir de Bourbon may sound like an exotic drink, but it is actually one of the rarest birds in the world. It is so rare, that it has taken a dedicated team of conservationists 15 years just to find their breeding grounds.

Into the Heart of the Jungle: Tracking the Black Panthers of Malaysia

Everybody knew Bagheera, and nobody dared to cross his path; for he was as cunning as [the golden jackal] Tabaqui, as bold as the wild buffalo, and as reckless as the wounded elephant. But he had a voice as soft as wild honey dripping from a tree, and a skin softer than dawn. —Rudyard Kipling,…

Dodging Disney: Bahamians Seek Science to Save the Egg Island Hope Spot

By: Shilpi Chhotray, Mission Blue Communications Strategist “Tourists from around the world come to see an untouched Bahamas. Meanwhile, the government says that cultivating high-volume, high-impact deals with cruise lines will bring local jobs. In reality few locals are hired to staff the cruise lines’ “private islands” and these fantasy terraforming projects naturally conflict with…

Together Panthers and Ranchers can Keep Florida Wild

“The panther is going to have to help us save Florida.”—Cary Lightsey, whose family has been ranching in Florida since the 1850s

‘The Remotest Island,’ the Warmest Welcome!

Expedition leader Paul Rose has been wanting to reach Tristan da Cunha since he was 10 years old. As a new expedition brings him there at last, he already feels part of the family.