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Category archives for Science

How Paper Cranes Became a Symbol of Healing in Japan

Every day school children visit the monument for the child victims of Hiroshima adorned with a statue of Sadako Sasaki holding up an origami crane. The museum receives millions of paper cranes from around the world. Photograph By Ari Beser.    Hiroshima, JAPAN—Origami, the Japanese art of folding paper, often conjures images of paper cranes, or…

Stormy Summer of 2005 Prompted Hurricane Forecast Improvements

Powerful Hurricane Wilma’s storm surge inundated the lower Florida Keys in October 2005. (Photo by Jeff Pinkus) The powerful hurricanes that prowled the Gulf of Mexico during the summer of 2005 prompted evacuation orders that sent millions of people from Houston to Key West scrambling for safety. The evacuations saved lives, but for people who…

The Stunning Ways Driftwood Builds Landscapes

Rivers and lakes were constructing with lumber long, long before people (or beavers) ever had the idea.

Fuzzy Nautilus Rediscovered and Filmed After 30 Years

Thirty years after their discovery, these unusual living fossils return to the spotlight to be tracked and filmed and reveal the secrets of the deep.

Smuggled iguanas tell larger tale of animal trafficking

The two Northern Bahamian Rock Iguanas (Cyclura cychlura) that arrived recently to Shedd Aquarium are familiar faces to me. I’ve dedicated more than 20 years of my life studying the three types (i.e. subspecies) of this species in The Bahamas. During this time, I have been fortunate to work with dedicated individuals and organizations, such…

Join Live Twitter Chat With Explorers in the Okavango Delta

Join the team August 26 at 12 p.m. EDT, for a live Twitter chat by following @intotheokavango and @NatGeoLive and tweeting your questions with #NatGeoLive!

In Nagasaki, New Art Exhibit “Antimonument” Rethinks The Bomb

 Visual artist Shinpei Takeda stands in front of his exhibit titled “Antimonument.” Photographs By Ari Beser. “What is Antimonument supposed to mean?” I asked Ryuta Imafuku, cultural anthropologist at the Tokyo University of Foreign Studies. “There is no such thing as ‘supposed to,’” replied Imafuku, partner of visual artist Shinpei Takeda, whose new exhibit, “Antimonument,” is…

A World Without Rivers

 I was looking at a river bed And the story it told of a river that flowed Made me sad to think it was dead (From the song “A Horse with No Name” by America) Some of my favorite photographic images are those of the Earth filmed from satellites in space. In those breathtakingly beautiful…

Conservation Triumphs on the Eighth Continent

“The true biologist deals with life,” says my favorite author, “with teeming boisterous life, and learns something from it, learns that the first rule of life is living.” After thirteen months in Madagascar, I will dare to call myself a biologist—one who has learned truly what it means to live.

Chasing Orangutans Into an Unknown Frontier

I’ll be entering into mysterious areas under the shadow of Mt. Gunung Palung, places where few have ventured into and where none have followed orangutans. I’ll be exploring the unknown.

Three Levels of Arctic Sea Monster Fossils Revealed

This year’s field season up in the Svalbard archipelago is revealing marine reptile fossils of different kinds spanning millions of years.

Conservationists Clash on #CecilTheLion, Hunting, and the Future

Cecil the Lion’s illegal killing isn’t just trending in news, it was trending in the hallways of the International Congress of Conservation Biology (ICCB) last week. The biennial, five-day gathering of 2,000 scientists is structured by formal, planned presentations. But on the conference’s last day, an untraditional pop-up session called “#CecilTheLion: What Next?” revealed just how factionalized…

‘Geno 2.0: Next Generation’ Reveals New Details of Your Ancient Ancestry

Geno 2.0: Next Generation (Geno NextGen) is the next phase of the Genographic Project, National Geographic’s pioneering effort to decode the story of individuals’ deep ancestry hidden within their DNA. Geno NextGen builds on the success of Geno 2.0 by growing the analytical capabilities of the test and enhancing the participant Geno 2.0 experience. Here…

The Geyser in Geysir (Iceland)

It was a cold and blustery October day! Our tour bus had stopped at a desolate site where a group of visitors had lined up, cameras at the ready, all anxiously waiting. Then suddenly it happened! Perhaps by now you’ve guessed what these people were waiting for. Right after I took this photo, I rushed…

From Mussels to Crayfish and Gobies: Have the Great Lakes Experienced an “Invasional Meltdown?”

Guest post by Eric Larson, postdoctoral research associate, Shedd Aquarium Not many people have likely heard of Beaver Island, a large, isolated island located far off shore at the northern end of Lake Michigan. Home to roughly 600 permanent residents and accessible only by ferry or small plane, Beaver Island is a well-kept secret of…