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Category archives for Science

Are Fences the Solution for Protecting Africa’s National Parks?

With the expansion of human populations, instances of human-wildlife conflict become increasingly frequent. One proposed solution to protect both people and wildlife is the implementation of fences around established protected areas. Many conservation scientists argue that these fences may do more harm than good. A recent paper published in June by some of the world’s most renowned…

Going Live with “Looking for Life”

Last week, I was in Washington DC for the Pre-Departure Orientation of the next round of Fulbright-National Geographic Fellows. During my visit, I gave a presentation about my time in Botswana and the progress on LOOKING FOR LIFE, my short documentary. In addition to speaking and showing images from my fellowship, I screened a two-minute…

Wings, Water, Wind, and Hope in Hawaii

Because the Hawaiian islands were created by volcanoes, all life had to arrive there either by water, wind, or wings. After many negative effects, can humans help preserve some of this delicate ecology?

Biking With Fresh Air, the Open Road, and an Awful Lot of Roadkill

Julie Hotz is biking from L.A. to Montana, then hiking to the Pacific Coast, recording every bit of roadkill she sees. It’s important information, and it doesn’t come free.

Flood Carries River Monsters Onto the Land

The Texas floods provided an unusual reminder that our buildings and byways are a very recent arrival to this ancient landscape.

A life-changing experience studying iguanas in the Bahamas

Guest post by Shannan Yates, a student at The College of the Bahamas, who recently attended one of Shedd Aquarium’s field research trips to Andros Island in The Bahamas. In the spring of 2014, I had the opportunity of a lifetime that changed me both professionally and personally. At a conference on Bahamian natural history,…

Capuchin Monkey Soap Opera in Costa Rica

After 25 years in the field, anthropologist Susan Perry is still shocked by the sex, violence, and politics that rule the capuchin monkey world of Costa Rica.

The Hazards of Growing Up on Treasure Island: One of the Most Beautiful Places on Earth

Some residents who live on Treasure Island in the San Francisco Bay are concerned about exposure to toxins, because many areas on the island have been marked as radioactive. While officials at the California Environmental Protection Agency have not currently identified unsafe levels of contamination in homes on the island, young people who live there still worry about potential health risks.

Think Fast: What Bird Is This?

Artist and science illustrator Jane Kim is painting all 241 modern bird families on a giant mural at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology. Learn how she captures details that make each species unique.

The Birth of Biodiversity

If you’ve been reading the news this week, you know that we’ve just been starkly reminded that the Earth is in the midst of a mass extinction – a biodiversity crisis like nothing it has experienced in 65 million years. Yet while species disappear at an unprecedented rate, new species are also being born all…

Can We Stop the Sixth Mass Extinction?

Rewilding, de-extinction, and an old-fashioned change of heart could all help stem the tide of biodiversity loss in our time.

The Causes Big and Small of the Sixth Mass Extinction

As we reach out across the planet and attempt to exploit it, for better or worse, the cost of our activities appears ever more burdensome. What could be driving such an obviously risky enterprise for our species?

Sixth Mass Extinction Really Started Thousands of Years Ago

The sixth mass extinction may have begun as a natural shift in the past, but it is increasingly a human problem in the present. In order to avert this recurring tragedy, humanity must learn from the extinctions of the past.

Art and Dance in the Drone Age

This post is the latest in the Drones and Small Unmanned Aerial Systems Special Series, which profiles interesting information, research and thoughts on using drones, UAVs and remotely piloted vehicles for journalism and photography, that Kike learns about during his travels. This post is also the latest in the World of Dances series, which profiles ballet and dance photography in iconic, architectonically unique,…

Arapaima Research Taking New Heights: Aerial Tracking

Guest post by Dr. Lesley de Souza, postdoctoral research associate, Shedd Aquarium For the past two years I have been studying Arapaima movements in the Rewa River drainage and tracking 29 individual Arapaima with Shedd Aquarium. A pattern has emerged highlighting that the majority of these tagged individuals are returning to the same place where they…