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Category archives for Science

Climate, Oceans, the United Nations, and What’s Next

For many of us jaded New Yorkers, the United Nations is merely a reason that traffic is periodically terrible on the Upper East Side, when world leaders gather. Perhaps now, after the US Administration has announced it will take steps to pull the United States out of the UN’s Paris Agreement on climate change, we…

2017 Hurricane Season Expected To Be Active

Meteorologists at Colorado State University and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration think the 2017 Atlantic hurricane season could be an active one. CSU forecasters think 14 named tropical storms will form in the Atlantic Basin, which includes the Atlantic Ocean, Caribbean Sea and Gulf of Mexico. The NOAA forecast covers a wider range of…

Top 25 Wild Bird Photographs of the Week #90

The Wild Bird Trust and the Wildbird! Revolution are proud to present the 90th edition on the Top 25 Wild Bird Photographs of the week. Each week we are flooded with far more than 25 worthy entries which makes the job of selecting the “Top 25” extremely difficult but also very rewarding. We thank all…

Two Days at the Grand Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve

As part of an ongoing project, Erika Zambello is visiting all National Estuarine Research Reserves in the continental United States. Established by NOAA, the sites work together toward long-term research, education and coastal stewardship. Day 1 The Reserve Founded in 1999, the Grand Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve (NERR) covers over 18,000 acres along the…

Reef rhythms

Jessica Perelman, a scientist at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute, describes how sound can be used to study coral reefs.

Top 25 Wild Bird Photographs of the Week #89

The Wild Bird Trust presents the 89th edition of the “Top 25 Wild Bird Photographs of the Week”. Thanks again for all your photo contributions.  Some really interesting Wild Bird photos this week ranging from African Penguins to Whiskered Terns. To submit your photo for selection in the Top 25, please post your image on the…

National Geographic Emerging Explorer Federico Fanti Decoding the Death (and Life) of the Dinosaurs

This post is part of an ongoing series of interviews with the 2017 class of National Geographic Emerging Explorers.

Holding the Cosmos in Our Hands

“The seed comes from the tree, the tree comes from the seed. It’s like the chicken and the egg. If people want to understand it, they will break the seed apart — they will actually kill it — to see the cells, the chromosomes and the genetics. There is another way to look at this. I plant a seed and a miracle happens — something new is born out of this carbohydrate and protein, a new life is born. This is a miracle, you see? The miracle of life.”

The Value of Tiny Islands

Tiny rock stacks around the world have critical value for conservation but are often neglected. Yesterday I visited a number of such small rock stacks in New Zealand’s Hauraki Gulf to check on their status.

1Frame4Nature | Baby Giants in the Deep Blue

Started in 2014, my long-term documentary project “Baby Giants” focuses on the conservation work of the critically endangered Kemp’s Ridley and other endangered sea turtles. Help is already underway to bring these sea turtle populations back from the brink, and I get to share this story of hope and invite you to join the efforts for sea turtles.

Dodging a Heavy Bough, Fleeing Angry Wasps — Another day in Yasuni Rain Forest

I have now reached the final push in deploying cameras in the canopy. I’m sitting at in the library of the Tiputini Biodiversity Station near Yasuní National Park after placing cameras in six Ficus trees spread across the trails near the research facility. I’ve also got cameras running at the Yasuní Research Station, two hours up the river, where I’ll return to set up a few more cameras later this week.

The past few days have involved a lot of climbing, most of which has been in trees I had never climbed before. The canopy habitat is dynamic, changing frequently as storms weaken structures and animals move in and out of their homes. Because of this, even on familiar trees, every climb is new to some extent, but I tend to find the first ascent of a new tree holds the most surprises, delightful or otherwise.

Smartphones and drones launch ConservationFIT on the International Day for Biological Diversity.

Submitted by Zoe Jewell and Sky Alibhai of ConservationFIT   Today, May 22, is the 2017 International Day for Biological Diversity. In the beautifully-phrased words of E.O. Wilson, world-renowned conservationist, biodiversity is “the assembly of life that took a billion years to evolve. It has eaten the storms, folded them into its genes, and created the…

Ascension Island: Pristine Seas Heads to the Mountains!

We are headed to Ascension Island, a tiny volcanic island in the South Atlantic, midway between Brazil and Africa. It’s a powerful place where the deep sea and remote mountains collide, leaving the island as the small visible tip of a massive 3,200-meter mountain.

The Cost of Everything and the Value of Nothing: Falling Costs Are a Game-Changer

By Lynn Scarlett, Global Managing Director for Public Policy, The Nature Conservancy For the average U.S. consumer, electricity is an unremarkable fact of their existence—when they flip the switch, the light comes on. But behind that simple act is a feat of forecasting, engineering, logistics and timing that is mind-bogglingly complex. At the heart of this process is the mix of generation sources—the different electric power plants…

Top 25 Wild Bird Photographs of the Week #88

The Wild Bird Trust presents the 88th edition of the “Top 25 Wild Bird Photographs of the Week”. Thank you to all contributing photographers and all WildBird! revolutionaries! To submit your photo for selection in the Top 25, please post your image on the Wild Bird Trust Facebook page with details on species, location and…