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Category archives for Science

Pride in Our Prides – Saving Lions with Livestock Kraals

Post submitted by Florian J Weise Lions and people live a tenuous coexistence. Where their activities overlap problems are inevitable. The consequence often is fatal; sometimes for the people involved, more frequently so for the lions. In retaliation of attacks on humans or livestock, people resort to drastic measures including poisoning. Along the northern edge…

It Takes a Village for Effective Conservation Projects: Insights from the Urban Caracal Project

By Laurel Serieys, Joleen Broadfield, and Max Allen In running the Urban Caracal Project there have been a number of learning opportunities. One of our most important insights is that by prioritizing public outreach we have built a strong community support group without which the project would be impossible. The community support has not just…

Island Biology 2016, Azores

This week the second Island Biology conference is taking place in the Azores Islands of Portugal. Its hard to believe its already been two years since the first one in Hawaii.

Look Into This Dolphin’s Eyes and Tell Me That’s Not Grief!

By Maddalena Bearzi Although we live thousands of miles and an ocean apart, my brother Giovanni and I share not only the same bloodline but also a passion for dolphins. For more than two decades, both of us have conducted scientific and conservation research on marine mammals in the wild; Gio in the waters of…

Banding Florida’s Snowy Plovers

At first, it was almost impossible to see the Snowy Plovers as they ran along the waves ahead of me. I was walking along the surf on Okaloosa Island, part of the Emerald Coast on Florida’s Panhandle. With their pale tan and white plumage, the birds seemed to melt into the sugar-white sand beach. The…

This walrus blog contains plastic

I’m in the high Arctic, far north of Norway at around 78º N latitude in a group of islands known collectively as Svalbard. For a few days I’m a guest on the Greenpeace ship Arctic Sunrise while we do a little investigating into the arrival of fishing ships into these waters as the ocean warms…

Mobula Munkiana – The Secret of El Barril

Clap, slap, clap clap clap! Mobula munkiana, also known as “Munk’s Devil Ray” explode out of the water around us like popcorn. Each, about the size of a coffee table in diameter, they leap out of the water and flap their wings as if they were able to take to the sky and fly like…

Becoming Naturalists at the E.O. Wilson Biophilia Center

At the E.O. Wilson Biophilia Center in East Freeport, Florida, children are learning about nature by experiencing it firsthand. Developed by Walton County conservationist M.C. Davis in 2009, the Center sits on the 50,000-acre Nokuse Plantation. Paul Arthur, president of Nokuse Education Inc. and director of E.O. Wilson Biophilia Center for the past five years,…

Return to the World’s Oldest Desert (and Its Bats!)

Theresa Laverty studies the drivers of desert bat abundance and diversity for her Ph.D. in Joel Berger’s lab at Colorado State University. She has returned to Namibia a second time and is in the midst of another year of fieldwork.

Abyssinian Owl Remains Elusive Amidst Beauty and Hardship on Mt Kenya

Mount Kenya is equal parts beautiful and brutal.  Amidst the moorlands, Lobelias rise like skyscrapers, and lacking competition from the other odd-ball assortment of plants in this “Planet of the Apes” landscape, they protrude like beacons marking your slow progress one agonizing step at a time. At nearly 12,000 ft (3650 m), the only things…

It’s Catching, If You’re a Clam: Infectious Cancer Spreading in Soft-Shell Clams, Other Mollusks

It sounds like the plot of a summer horror flick: Malignant cells floating in the sea, ferrying infectious cancer everywhere they go. The story is all too true, say scientists who’ve made a discovery they call “beyond surprising.” Outbreaks of leukemia that have devastated populations of soft-shell clams (Mya arenaria) along the east coast of…

From Miami to Australia—Dredging and industrial activities killing coral reefs

Co-authored by Erica Cirino In the Port of Miami, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers’ recent dredging project has buried as much as 81 percent of the area’s reef in silty sediment with up to 95 percent of the reef area surveyed no longer suitable habitat for corals, leaving its corals vulnerable to death, according…

Resetting the rules for pest control

The science of pest control includes developing and testing new tools. Today we deployed self-resetting traps on Goat Island to test their efficiency at keeping rats from perpetually reinvading the island.

Hawaii’s Legendary Voyaging Canoe Makes History at the UN

Hawaii’s legendary traditional voyaging canoe Hōkūleʻa achieved the pinnacle of her historic four-year sail around the world at today’s United Nations (UN) celebration of World Oceans Day: a global event focused on ocean celebration and collaboration for a better future. This year’s theme of “Healthy Oceans, Healthy Planet” encouraged individuals and organizations across the globe to…

The Safina Center celebrates World Oceans Day

Co-authored by Erica Cirino Oceans are essential to life on Earth: They cover more than two-thirds of the planet and contain 97 percent of its water. They absorb carbon from the atmosphere, helping regulate our climate. They provide humans with food and transportation routes for trade and travel. And best of all, they’re filled with…