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Category archives for Science

Reading the Prairie Waterlines

Kim Tri considers the role of water on the prairie—where it is, where it’s been, and what it leaves behind.

Now starring as diplomat: Bianca Jagger defends forests at UN climate talks in Peru

LIMA, Peru – Whatever her youthful reputation as the wife of a world-famous rock star and glittery jet setter, Bianca Jagger has committed much of the past 30 years of her life to advancing causes associated with human rights and environmental protection in the developing world. On Sunday morning, during a side event connected with…

A Volcanic Adventure on “The Giver”

Ken Sims is off to explore another volcano—this time in the dizzying reaches of Ecuador’s highlands. The Sangay volcano is one of the most remote, dangerous and active volcanoes in the world, and Ken wants to collect lava samples as they erupt from the summit.

100 Trans-Atlantic Sailors Rally for Science

A huge fleet of ships studies the plastic content of the ocean in the Atlantic Rally for Cruisers.

Genographic Project Participants Help Refine Human Family Tree

The Genographic Project recently released the most refined evolutionary tree of the human Y chromosome, which every male inherits directly from his father. The new Y tree was created in part through the help of the 300,000 male participants that have joined this one-of-a-kind project to trace their own ancestry and become citizen scientists. As more…

Tolaga Bay Islands

Last weekend I visited Uawa (Tolaga Bay) and was lucky enough to visit some of the offshore islands off the coast and survey them. A small group of us were supported by the local surf life-saving club who capably took us out in their IRBs to visit Motueka and Pourewa Islands. On each island we…

Steve Winter on the Trail of Big Cats for Big Cat Week

From trekking India’s Himalayas in search of rare snow leopards, to stalking the elusive jaguar through Latin American jungles, to chronicling the nocturnal activities of the cougar, there is nowhere Steve Winter won’t go to come face-to-face with his subjects.

Help National Geographic Give on #GivingTuesday

This #GivingTuesday, explore the ways we give around the world and the stories we bring back, and help us keep up National Geographic’s legacy of protecting wildlife, wild landscapes, and human cultures around the world.

Big Cat Selfies for #GivingTuesday

This Giving Tuesday, get inspired by some selfies taken by lions in the wild, then support NG’s Big Cats Initiative and help spread the word by tagging @CauseanUproar in your own #UNselfie!

The Latest Threat to Siberian Tigers: Canine Distemper

Talking Tigers: Part 8 of a 12-part series The first signs that something was wrong came in 2000. Gaunt Siberian tigers (Panthera tigris altaica) began wandering through villages and staggered haltingly across roads in Russia’s Far East. They were dazed, hungry and boldly unafraid of humans, extremely odd behavior for this secretive, wary animal. One of them…

Flying Robots Serving in Singapore by 2015

This post is the latest in the Drones and Small Unmanned Aerial Systems Special Series,  which profiles interesting information, thoughts and research into using  drones, UAVs or remotely piloted vehicles for journalism and photography, that Kike learns about during his travels.      Can you imagine going to a restaurant and being served by a flying robot? Reality might surpass your…

Google+ Hangout: Get to Know India’s Curious Big Cats

As part of Big Cat Week on Nat Geo Wild, several National Geographic big cat researchers, photographers, and conservationists (including me) are joining together for a live video chat via Google+ Hangout Wednesday, December 3rd at 1 p.m. EST (6 p.m. UTC). This is your chance to get your questions about these beautiful, fascinating, and highly endangered animals answered by those of us…

Mapping and Protecting the Biggest Cat in the Americas

The once unassailable jaguar now survives in a few pockets throughout North and South America. Explore an interactive map to reveal the corridors that connect these populations and are key to their livelihood. Then join us for a Google+ Hangout to explore the world of big cats for yourself.

Chimpanzees and the Battle Over Human Nature

Were humans born to war? Or is warfare a recent, rare development in our history? Studies of chimps and early human civilizations give clues to the origins of this kind of violence.

November 23, 2014: Set Speed Records on El Capitan, Prosecute Poaching Kingpins and More

This week on National Geographic Weekend, join host Boyd Matson and his guests as they ride horses from Calgary to Brazil, pick the perfect bottle of wine for Thanksgiving dinner, find the best places to travel right now, come back from the dead, provide solar power for the future, protect mountain gorillas and Africa’s oldest national park, eat beef, cycle through all seasons, and teach Africa’s young women to be the continent’s future leaders.