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Category archives for Science

World of Dances #4

This post is the latest in the World of Dances series, which profiles ballet and dance photography in iconic, architectonically unique, culturally emblematic, rapidly vanishing landmarks or simply unexpected locations, that Kike captures about during his travels.     Dancer: Suzana Stankovic. Location: Downtown Manhattan during the 2012 New York blackout after Hurricane Sandy. Learn more about World of Dances Print Collection Follow Kike Calvo on Instagram, Facebook, Twitter, Web, Tumblr,…

New Tool To Monitor Harmful Bacteria at Beaches

An international team, led by researchers has developed a new, timelier method to identify harmful bacteria levels on recreational beaches. The new model provides beach managers with a better prediction tool to identify when closures are required to protect beachgoers from harmful contaminates in the water. “The development of this new model has allowed us,…

Threatened Corals Swap “Algae” Partners to Survive Warming Oceans

A new research study showed why threatened Caribbean star corals sometimes swap partners to help them recover from bleaching events. The findings are important to understand the fate of coral reefs as ocean waters warm due to climate change. The University of Miami (UM) Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science research team placed colonies…

World of Dances #3

This post is the latest in the World of Dances series, which profiles ballet and dance photography in iconic, architectonically unique, culturally emblematic, rapidly vanishing landmarks or simply unexpected locations, that Kike captures about during his travels. Ballet: Cuban National Ballet ( Ballet Nacional de Cuba ) Location: Old Havana (Cuba)   Learn more about World of Dances Print Collection Follow Kike Calvo on Instagram, Facebook, Twitter, Web, Tumblr, or LinkedIn Learn more:…

Bat-Survey Lesson No. 42: Don’t Step on Any Lions

Northwestern Namibia’s desert may appear barren, but it is full of life as the dry season and Young Explorers Grantee Theresa Laverty’s pilot field season conclude.

Can Wild Monkeys Hang With Humans?

Are the macaques of Gibraltar just manipulating tourists for free handouts, or is there more to this interspecies relationship? National Geographic’s Kyler Abernathy finds out.

Oil spill impacts the developing hearts of fish

There is increasing concern as to the potential impacts of oil spills on the health of fish. A little over five years ago, the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico released more than 636 million liters of crude oil. The oiled covered spawning areas for many commercially and ecologically important fishes. Accordingly,…

High-Tech Mapping Sheds New Light on the Atlantic Seafloor

The ancient Irish may have done it. The Vikings certainly did. And now a team of scientists is crossing the Atlantic by ship, preparing to make the most complete map ever of its floor.

Why Ocean Conservationists Should Pay More Attention to Wikipedia

When the average internet user seeks out information on a scientific topic, the first place she turns to isn’t the latest scientific literature or even a mainstream news publication, it’s Wikipedia. Google any scientific topic and the online encyclopedia will turn up as the first or second search result. Though many within the science community…

Seeing Exploration in Madagascar Through New Eyes

A month ago, fresh from the intellectual stimulation of a scientific conference, I blogged about coevolving pathogens. Today, my hair is grown long and wild, my jeans threadbare, my shoes in tatters, and once more, I feel at a very far distance from that academic other-world in which I also live.

Here’s What 40,000 Photos of Wildlife Looks Like

People all around the world submitted nearly 40,000 observations of plants, animals, and fungi to create a global snapshot of biodiversity last month, as part of National Geographic’s Great Nature Project.

Is Chumming for Sharks Keeping Them Closer to Home?

Conservation biologist Kaia Tombak drops herself into shark­-infested waters to debunk the terrifying myths and stigmas attached to these top predators.

Why Uganda´s Bushfires Aren’t All Bad

During our field surveys to better understand the primate diversity of north-eastern Uganda, we seek the least travelled routes and those areas for which primates have never been surveyed. During our explorations in February 2015 we encountered many devastating bushfires.

Wildlife in London? Deer Me!

London’s Richmond Park may seem like a patch of untouched wilderness, but 700 years of human interaction have helped shape this urban oasis.

“Disenchanted”: Easter Island – A Paradise Devastated by Plastic Pollution

Arrived on the legendary Easter Island (Chile) on May 20th, the R4WO scientific teams have proceeded onto the first scientific surveys in the South Pacific Garbage Patch on the coasts of the island devastated by plastic waste. At the same time, they have also continued with different sociological studies undertaken until now with local populations.   …