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Category archives for Science

Saving Sharks with Satellites

In the past I have blogged about how the use of electronic tagging and tracking can support the conservation of marine animals. I have also addressed some misconceptions about shark tagging studies and discussed the value of such research for conservation. Building off these topics, I would like to share the results of two recently…

Surf’s Up For Wildlife

New research published in the journal Ecology finds that a wide-variety of fish and wildlife are professional surfers. But don’t expect to see these animals in the next remake of Point Break, they don’t surf waves of water; they surf waves of food, and it may be their only way to make a good living.…

Keeping Track of ‘Students’ in a Shark Kindergarten

Remote cameras and careful tagging could solve some lingering mysteries around Clipperton Island.

Into the Lions Den: Diffusing a Lion Hunting Party

Post submitted by Eric LeFlore and Andrew Stein.  It’s 6am on a Friday morning and the kettle has just boiled for morning tea when the phone rings. After some pleasant introductions in Setswana, the main reason for the call comes up. The conversation is quick but the angst is apparent. I hear from the other…

Notes from the Field: Reporting on ‘Island Time’

After three dizzying days at sea, I was relieved to step off the boat in Tarawa, Kiribati. I’d just spent six weeks on the remote Pacific island of Banaba–a place so isolated that currently there is no phone, internet, or mail service. Being off the grid for more than a month was difficult for me,…

Why Clipperton Island Is a ‘Beautiful, Powerful Surprise!’

Explorer Paul Rose looks back at recent discoveries during the final days of the latest Pristine Seas expedition.

Best Job Ever: Exploring Super-Remote Caves in Greenland

Geologist Gina Moseley started caving for sport when she was 13 years old, and now she’s in it for science. Moseley is constructing the first cave-based record of past climate change for Greenland.

So You Want to Create Maps Using Drones?

The latest in the Drones and Small Unmanned Aerial Systems Special Series, in which Kike profiles interesting information, research and thoughts on using drones, UAVs and remotely piloted vehicles for journalism and photography.     The combination of light (photo), drawings (gram) and measurements (metry) are known as photogrammetry. Until recently, photogrammetry was a very specific niche within the…

Conservation Silver Bullet

Conserving the rarest species on the planet can be a complex problem, and a silver bullet solution has so far been evasive. However, like the silver bullet which killed mythical creatures, mammal eradications appear to solve this problem and indeed save species.

Island Life

The great man Christian Jost has been camping alone on Clipperton Island for the past four nights. Not entirely alone – he’s had about 100,000 masked boobies, 7,000 brown boobies, 500 red – footed boobies, 1,500 frigate birds, 1million crabs, 2,000 rats, the rusting remains of the guano (bird poop) industry, a mysterious algae and bacteria filled lagoon, 900 coconut palms and…

Climate, Movement, and the Spread of Disease

“Diseases track human migrations all throughout history,” says Amy Winter. What will that mean as people move to adapt to the changing climate?

Play It By Ear and Make Friends With the Fish!

The highly energetic, beautiful reefs of Clipperton are dominated by moray eels. I’ve never seen anything like it. Typically, with most of their long bodies hidden inside holes, you only see their heads and the constantly opening and closing of their mouths displaying a fierce array of teeth. It’s different here – they are constantly…

In a Bubble of Air in the Deep Pacific

Three hours might sound like a long dive, but it goes fast and the ascent into the light and these evocative, most beautiful blue waters comes too soon.

Watch: Monarch Butterflies Get Tiny Radio Trackers

National Geographic grantee Martin Wikelski tries to put electronic tags on free-flying monarch butterflies for the first time ever in order to track their remarkable migration.

Warming seas may cause more disease, Cornell researchers say.

Co-authored by Erica Cirino It’s June 2013: A group of park rangers are walking down a peaceful strip of shoreline in Washington State’s famous Olympic National Park when they spot an alarming sight: dozens of shriveled, gooey-looking purple and orange sea stars trying to cling to a rock. There’s something wrong, but the rangers are…