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Category archives for Physics

Inaugural Governor’s Institutes of Vermont on Astronomy Challenges Students to Make a Positive Impression

The Governor’s Institutes are some of the best educational opportunities for Vermont teenagers in the summer. This year they launched their first Institute on Astronomy in partnership with the Fairbanks Museum and Planetarium, the Northeast Kingdom Astronomy Foundation, Lyndon State College, and the Vermont Space Grant Consortium. Their hope was to expose the 25 students who attended to astronomy…

December 21, 2014: Reviving the Mammoth, Traveling From Canada to Tibet With 2 Kids and 0 Airplanes

This week on National Geographic Weekend, join host Boyd Matson and his guests as they search for enlightenment at a Buddhist monastery with their families, search for pain at high altitude, sacrifice children and llamas in Peru, recreate the mammoth, don’t finish a bucket list, rap about the wilderness, improve our IQ, figure out how to avoid avalanches in the backcountry, and photograph Europe’s large carnivores.

December 14, 2014: Survive The Horrors of WWII With the Hero of “Unbroken,” Chase Water Down the Colorado River and More

This week on National Geographic Weekend, join host Boyd Matson and his guests as they decide survival over summit glory in Myanmar, remain “Unbroken” with the hero of Angelina Jolie’s newest film, spill the secrets of Southern cuisine, track Berlin’s booming boar population, dodge los malditos on the rejuvenated Colorado River, teach kids to value the environment in school, paddle 2,000 miles to protect pristine wilderness, learn the forces that move Sarajevo’s society, and tap into nature’s therapeutic capabilities.

Mystery Solved? How Birds Weather Turbulence

When turbulence hits, flying birds can’t fasten their seatbelts—so at least one species of eagle tucks its wings to stabilize flight, a new study says.

Snake Robots Crack Mystery of How Reptiles Climb Dunes

High-speed video and customized “snakebots” have revealed that a desert snake uses a highly unique slither to climb sandy hills, a new study says.

The Scarce Mineral Behind the 2014 Nobel Prize in Physics

  This year’s Nobel Prize in Physics is thankfully not being awarded for the discovery of some esoteric atomic particle but rather for the development of a technology that impacts all our lives. The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences noted in its announcement that the prize was awarded to 3 scientists who “invented a new…

Missing Isotopes: What’s Happening in the World’s Highest Glaciers?

On the roof of the world in Tibet, Natalie Kehrwald and her colleagues have made a surprising discovery about climate and glaciers.

Cosmic Dust Clouds Gravitational Wave Finding

Dust may explain away a gravitational wave discovery.

September 7, 2014: Walking Through Conflict Zones, Driving 200 Miles Per Hour and More

This week on National Geographic Weekend radio, join host Boyd Matson and his guests as they dodge whales and pirates on the Indian Ocean, track poachers in Africa, find lost societies in Orkney, shed light on glowing sharks, harmonize with melting ice in Antarctica, live underwater for 31 days, follow in the pawprints of a lone wolf for 1,200 miles, and rove across the red planet.

Mystery Solved: How Archerfish Shoot Water at Prey With Stunning Precision

Archerfish, which use water jets to take down prey, are much more skilled and sophisticated target shooters than thought, a new study says.

Quantum Correlations: Interview With Nobel Laureate Brian Schmidt at ESOF on Success, Europe, Women in STEM, War and ET

By Alaina G. Levine On 21-26 June 2014, 4500 delegates from 75 nations assembled in Copenhagen, Denmark for an amazing event- the EuroScience Open Forum (ESOF). This all-purpose conference seeks to engage the STEM-hungry public about as many areas of science and engineering as possible, with talks, workshops and even a special outreach festival called…

August 31, 2014: Diving Deep For Bioluminescence, Mixing Climate Change With Music and More

This week on National Geographic Weekend, join host Boyd Matson and his guests as they dodge whales and pirates on the Indian Ocean, track poachers in Africa, find lost societies in Orkney, shed light on glowing sharks, harmonize with melting ice in Antarctica, live underwater for 31 days, follow in the pawprints of a lone wolf for 1,200 miles, and rove across the red planet.

NKAF Summer Space Camp Connects VT Teens to the Universe Once Again

This year’s Northeast Kingdom Astronomy Foundation (NKAF) Space Camp at Northern Skies Observatory (NSO) placed an emphasis on student astronomy projects of the camper’s choice either individually or in teams. At the conclusion of the camp, campers presented a report to parents and relatives about what they studied and learned during the week. In addition…

Mystery Solved: How Snakes Climb Trees

Researchers discover that for snakes climbing trees, it’s all about safety first.

Butterflies Can Evolve New Colors Amazingly Fast

Butterflies can evolve new colors rapidly and simply by tweaking the structures of their wings, a new study says.