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Category archives for Renewable Energy

Obama calls for a chilling on drilling in the Arctic

What President Obama’s decision on oil and gas leases in the Arctic means for life on Earth.

The Human Cost of Energy Development

This article is brought to you by the International League of Conservation Photographers (iLCP). Read our other articles on the National Geographic Voices blog featuring the work of our iLCP Fellow Photographers all around the world. Photos and Text by iLCP Fellow Karen Kasmauski  Cat Lodge, a cancer survivor, moved from Pittsburg to Pennsylvania’s Washington County so that she…

Winery Owners Fear Fracking Will Poison Tourism

But he’s not giving up on the idea of a permanent ban on fracking in Maryland – and he and Nadine have proven their ability to turn dreams into reality. Alongside their colleagues at Citizen Shale, as well as people across the state who envision a cleaner, more sustainable future for Maryland, it’s safe to bet that they’ll continue and win this fight.

Living in the Shadow of Fracking

This article is brought to you by the International League of Conservation Photographers (iLCP). Read our other articles on the National Geographic Voices blog featuring the work of our iLCP Fellow Photographers all around the world. Photos by iLCP Fellow Garth Lenz and Karen Kasmauski Text by iLCP Affiliate Mary Greene from the Environmental Integrity Project McDonald, Pa. — Jane…

Where I Was When I Heard the News

My surreal experience of Donald Trump’s election, far away from America When Donald J. Trump was elected President of the United States, I was sitting in a tin-roofed, dirt-floored cafe on the shore of Lake Victoria, in a bustling Kenyan fishing village called Usenge, waiting for a ferry and watching the sun rise. It should…

Saving Rice in Pictures

Not pictured: the dozens of hands cutting, sorting and hauling rice. The sweat-soaked saris and brows. The awe of witnessing the preservation of biodiversity.      

Solving Humanity’s Grand Challenges Requires a Healthy Ocean

Human well-being and human rights are inextricably tied to the health of the ocean, yet ocean conservation work is often isolated. Last month, as the United National General Assembly focused on tackling the grand challenges represented by the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), both the ocean goal (aka Goal 14, “Life Under Water”) and me, as…

Solar Power: A Winter Journey

Solar power has long been touted as an answer to the energy needs of rural communities living off-grid across the developing world. Over recent years the technology has advanced rapidly in terms of efficiency and price, finally making it a genuinely viable option, at household level at least. For the very same reasons – including a…

Saving Coral Reefs Requires Halting Climate Change

Local conservation efforts are important to restoring and protecting coral reefs. However, if we don’t halt climate change those efforts will not be enough to save them. That’s why marine biologists and ocean lovers have their eyes on the COP 21 climate negotiations in Paris this week. Last year, I co-authored a New York Times…

Uniting Ocean and Earth for Climate Action

This winter, the United Nations Climate Change Conference (COP21) in Paris will feature one of the largest gatherings of world leaders to ever address global warming. The stage is set for all United Nations member states to come together and create an international agreement on the climate with the goal of keeping global warming below…

March 8, 2015: Bee Stings, Tiger Farms, Deadly Sugarcane and More

This week on National Geographic Weekend, join host Boyd Matson and his guests as they survive moose and cold temperatures to win the Yukon Quest, live in the wilderness for 8 months with moth-eating bears, photograph bees, learn about Mayan achievements, investigate China’s tiger farms, understand Nicaragua’s sugarcane worker health crisis, study the sunset’s colors, myth-bust “clean coal”.

March 1, 2015: Photographing a Revolution, Collecting Subway Bacteria and More

This week on National Geographic Weekend, join host Boyd Matson and his guests as they swab New York’s subways for bacteria, plan the perfect surf getaway, photograph a revolution, study the world’s most important fish, meet a glow in the dark shark, leave and return to a beloved homeland, learn the best way to eat a banana, and plan for sea level rise.

February 8, 2015: Photographing “Snottites,” Dodging Humpbacks With Feeding Orcas, and More

This week on National Geographic Weekend, join host Boyd Matson and his guests as they dodge humpbacks while photographing orcas, study sulfuric snot deep in caves, understand the invisible brain injuries impacting veterans, learn to tell visual stories at a photo camp in South Sudan, climb up Niagara Falls, put a magnet inside of a cow’s stomach, visit Syria’s refugee camps, and understand animal friends.

February 1, 2015: Shooting Sharks, Models and The Pros and Cons of Adventure Preparation

This week on National Geographic Weekend, join host Boyd Matson and his guests as they motorcycle from Tibet to France, photograph crocodiles, sharks and models, get abandoned near the summit of Turkey’s tallest mountain, celebrate Soviet McDonald’s, eschew risks for the kids, study energy and matter’s dark twins, studying cultures in transition to modernity, prepare 1,000 foods to eat before you die, and blow out candles at Everest’s base camp.

January 18, 2015: Backyard Photography Tips and Antarctic Volcano Hunting

This week on National Geographic Weekend, join host Boyd Matson and his guests as they hold their breath off 50 foot waterfalls, photograph backyard wildlife for National Geographic magazine, study red poop from blue whales, treat pets for depression with counseling and sometimes Prozac, walk through Walla Walla, dedicate your life to saving African wilderness, study volcanoes on the coldest continent, watch the circle of life unfold in the Ethiopian highlands, feed the 5000, and run with wild dogs.