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Enlarged Papahanaumokuakea Benefits Hawaii’s Traditional Fishing Community

Last month’s historic expansion of Papahanaumokuakea Marine National Monument will, amongst many other things, assure that Hawaii’s small-boat commercial, subsistence, recreational, sport and charter boat fishermen will continue to be able to catch the tunas, billfish, bottomfish, and other species so important in our local communities.

The much larger Papahanaumokuakea Marine National Monument does not prevent our small boat fishermen from landing ahi or any other species, and in time it will mean our fishermen will have access to more ahi, bottom-fish and other species.

#MahaloObama: Celebrating the Largest Protected Area in the World

The following is a blog post by Jim Robinett, Senior Vice President of External and Regulatory Affairs at Shedd Aquarium. On Friday, the White House announced the passing of a bill to expand Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument, a marine ecosystem off the coast of Hawaii, making it the largest protected area in the world on land…

Opinion: Papahanaumokuakea Expansion Is Counterproductive for Hawaii’s Sustainable Fisheries

Hawaii is the most secluded island chain in the world. The ocean and the resources that come out of it are invaluable to the state. Eating and catching fish is a way of life and deeply rooted into the culture. Hawaii consumes nearly three times more seafood annually compared to the rest of the mainland.…

Plastics Found in One of Hawaii’s Most Remote Streams

Adventure Scientists for the Global Microplastics Initiative reach the most remote corners of the globe to help us understand the extent of plastic pollution worldwide. Collecting freshwater samples will provide critical data that can identify sources of microplastics in order to eliminate their introduction into the world’s water supply. Christian Shaw and Céline Jennsion of Plastic Tides are long-time ASC adventurers and…

Wings, Water, Wind, and Hope in Hawaii

Because the Hawaiian islands were created by volcanoes, all life had to arrive there either by water, wind, or wings. After many negative effects, can humans help preserve some of this delicate ecology?