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Sea Turtles Can Save Themselves If We Clean Up Our Act

Sea turtles have been swimming in our oceans ever since the time of the dinosaurs, enduring meteor collisions, ice ages, and the shifting of the continents. Yet human activity has recently brought many sea turtle populations to the brink of extinction. Even the largest of the sea turtles – the leatherback turtle, a prehistoric giant that can grow to over 2 meters in length – is rapidly vanishing from the East Pacific Ocean. This population has now declined by more than 98% in the past 25 years. In the hope of seeing populations recover, countless conservationists and volunteers work tirelessly day and night. But lest we forget, these people do not work alone, sea turtles themselves are also working hard in this struggle.

Life in the Gulf of California Hope Spot

The Gulf of California, a 700-mile narrow sea between Baja and mainland Mexico, is home to over 800 species of fish, 2000 invertebrates, as well as whales, dolphins, sea turtles and sea lions. The area includes 256,000 hectares of mangroves, 600,000 hectares of wetlands and 70 percent of Mexican fisheries. Simply put, this area is one of…