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Trump’s New Executive Order Will Worsen Hunger in Africa

Subsistence farmers stand to be among the biggest losers from the president’s dismantling of Barack Obama’s climate change legacy. On Tuesday, President Donald Trump took his most concrete step thus far to unravel his predecessor’s legacy on climate change, with a wide-ranging executive order that dismantles several Obama-era policies to restrict greenhouse gas pollution. The…

A Rich Petroglyph Site In Central Asia Offers a Lesson in Human Restlessness—and Patience

The drawings represent—what? A question? A plea? Perhaps a prayer? It is impossible to say. The figures carved, chipped, and rubbed into the large boulders of Cholpon Ata, a petroglyph site in far northern Kyrgyzstan, are silent. Indeed, they are steeped in such stillness that visitors whisper as they walk among them. The images are…

Sudan Border Walk: Shocking encounter with an electric catfish

We reached the river again after climbing one last hill. We saw both warthogs and giant forest hogs along the river. Also big news, very old tracks of a very large male hippo. He passed several months ago.

We can hear burros and people cutting a honey tree across the river; we will try to find them tomorrow morning.

Herve killed three tilapia and three polypteris fish with his machete. He also made the mistake of hitting an electric catfish. He said the shock that went right through the handle almost knocked him out.

Kittens-Sighting Is a Big Leap for Florida Panther Conservation

We just learned that at least two Florida panther kittens were found north of Caloosahatchee River for first time in decades. This is groundbreaking news for the recovery of an endangered big cat species and a clear cause for optimism.

1Frame4Nature | Esther Horvath

The mission aboard the 1942 DC3 aircraft is aimed at measuring ice thickness and changes in the Arctic Ocean. Lead scientist, Dr. Thomas Krumpen, has been overseeing the campaign called TIFAX since 2010, covering the same polar region, including Fram Streight and above Northern Greenland towards Nord Pole each year in July -August. During the three weeks campaign in 2016, the team flew a total of fifty hours during 10 survey flights, surveying 2300 miles/3700 km of ice surface. Findings from the campaign revealed surprisingly low summer ice thickness measurements. Since 2010, the Arctic summer ice thickness has reduced by 42%, presumably due to both rising atmospheric and sea temperatures.

Experts say marine protected areas are great but could be better with more staff and funding

A new study suggests many marine protected areas suffer from a lack of adequate staffing and funding–and that’s holding these areas back from reaching their full potential as protective areas for marine life.

Tiger Cubs: A Sign of Hope in Thailand

By Chris Hallam MSc Monitoring Advisor Every success in the conservation world is worth celebrating—no matter what species, location or size of impact. But some feel more significant than others… and the recent news out of Thailand is a perfect example. In Thailand, Panthera has partnered with the Thai Department of National Parks, Wildlife and Plant…

Sudan Border Walk: Pottery Shards Suggest Ancient Bantu Settlements

The slave-raiding here continued well into the beginning of the 20th Century. Cherry saw first-hand, just before the turn of the century, the devastation of villages, and slavers on raids. He witnessed cannibalism on a large scale, of the people who were not considered to be fit to be slaves. So these bits of pottery here are the remnants of one of those villages that may have gotten raided. It was nestled deep in the hills. Further to the north here I have seen entire alternate villages built into the rocky hills for protection from the raiders.

Sudan Border Walk Day 16: First Day Without Someone Being Sick

We reached the river at our target around noon. The water has also come up here. Took an afternoon stroll and saw fresh waterbuck tracks. In the evening, when the sun is going down and it starts to cool off, I am struck by four things: the beauty, the enormity, the thought of all this habitat that is intact (yet empty), and a mixed feeling of desperation and sadness that not more has been done to protect this gem on Earth.

Bhutan: Ecological Heart of the Eastern Himalaya

For a region as rich in biodiversity as the Eastern Himalaya, Bhutan’s healthy population of wild cats, including snow leopard in the north and tiger elsewhere, can serve to repopulate adjoining landscapes as long as the habitats are protected. Bhutan can function as the ecological heart of the Eastern Himalaya, sustaining rural people as well as unique species of wild cats in this large mountainous landscape. For these reasons, investing in Bhutan’s conservation efforts is beneficial to the world!

Sudan Border Walk: A Landscape Ready for Rewilding

As we cross the landscape, I am snapping pictures of the various vegetation types, and thinking about restoring this place. Compared to endless places around the world, I thought this place is like a city for animals that is completely equipped: the water and lights work, the buildings are in place, it just lacks the wildlife. I think about old sheep farms in South Africa, where they remove the sheep, restore the vegetation and watersheds, and bring back every species of large mammal that existed there before. Here, compared to the millions of hectares already restored in South Africa, this place is a piece of cake. The savanna, its forest, grass cover, creeks and rivers, and the remnants of fauna are all here.

The Time I Helped a Sloth to Cross the Road

It was my first day on the southern Caribbean coast of Costa Rica, and I was cycling along the thick forested road on my way to the Manzanillo National Wildlife Refuge, when I came across a strange animal crawling very slowly across the road. When I stopped to take a closer look, I realised it…

Sudan Border Walk: Camping on a Beach at the Chinko River

The team walked well. We reached the Chinko at 11h30 of marching. The water levels seem to be quite a bit lower now than when we passed by earlier. We found a beautiful spot to camp, with rocks and sandy beaches and good water and shade.

I took a stroll at 16h00. I love walking slowly in the late afternoon, kind of still hunting and enjoying this beautiful place. I saw guinea fowl and quite a few francolin, then a warthog. When I got a look at this guy, he had the biggest tusks I have ever seen on a warthog. They covered his eyes, they were so long.

Hokulea Visits the Pitcairn Islands

After 11 full days on the ocean, Hawaii’s iconic sailing vessel Hokulea and her crew arrived yesterday on Pitcairn Island for the first time in nearly 20 years.

The Grekos: A success story in the crackdown on illegal fishing

Investigative New York Times Reporter and Safina Center Fellow tells the tale of The Grekos, a case of an illegal fishing crackdown success story.