VOICES Voices Icon Ideas and Insight From Explorers

Menu

Latest / page 2

Citizen scientists give NPS 100,000+ biodiversity records for 100th birthday

Today, the U.S. National Park Service turns 100 years old. The National Park Service has been celebrating all year by organizing over 100 BioBlitzes to document the species living in our national parks, recreation areas, monuments, and historic sites. In addition to the BioBlitzes, NPS has been working with iNaturalist to keep track of biodiversity…

Transforming Conservation in China with ‘Land Trust Reserves’

By Charles Bedford, The Nature Conservancy’s Regional Managing Director, Asia Pacific Region, and Dr. Jin Tong, The Nature Conservancy’s Science Director, China Program In 2012 in China, the 27,325-acre Laohegou Land Trust Reserve, was designed to link several existing reserves in Sichuan’s Pingwu County—home to golden snub-nosed monkeys, Asian golden cats and the highest density of endangered…

A Market-Based Strategy for Sustainable Water Management

By Brian Richter, Chief Scientist, Water, The Nature Conservancy Australia is one of the driest inhabited places on Earth. Yet nearly two-thirds of the country’s land area is devoted to agriculture, generating 93 percent of the domestic food supply. The country is only able to sustain this level of food production through irrigation and an…

Frank Ocean Versus the Actual Ocean

  It’s nice that Frank Ocean just released his long-anticipated new album, ‘Blond’, that some say is truly awesome. But the fact that his name linked to 12 of 20 articles on Google’s News search under the word ‘ocean’ on Sunday and on Monday had proportionately grown to 6 out of 9 ‘ocean’ news stories might also…

A week to Change: Phoenix Zoo and Jane Goodall Institute Join Forces to Improve Animal Welfare Around the World

In some zoos of foreign countries with limited knowledge and funding, animals are often found alone in sterile environments, on bare concrete floors and with no “furniture” (climbing structures, resting platforms, visual barriers and the like). Many times they are malnourished, injured and have a variety of behavioral problems. To complicate matters further, when I visit one of these zoos, I typically have only one week to make improvements. In the remaining time, it is my responsibility to assess, negotiate and improvise to make immediate changes with limited available resources.

Involving Communities in the Fight Against Wildlife Crime

It is in the hearts and minds of people at the grass roots as much as with ministers in the corridors of power and poachers in the field that the battle against wildlife crime has to be fought – and won.

Sharing Kenya’s Wilderness With Underprivileged City Children Uplifts, Inspires Everyone

World elephant Day celebration in Samburu Reserve with 91 children from Kenya’s poor neighbourhoods, slums and rural areas was probably the most moving experience of my life. The children experienced a real safari, in a four-wheel-drive vehicle. They camped for the first time in their lives, and they met wild wild animals in the wilderness of Samburu. But it was also a first for my team of staff, interns and volunteers who put on an ambitious three-day program – something we have never done before. In our first meeting the group of 20 enthusiasts created a trip of discovery, play and learning for the children. My rule was that it must be the same for all the staff too.

Young Micronesians Explore Nan Madol: A New UNESCO World Heritage Site Located In Their Backyard.

Last month, UNESCO officially announced 21 new additions to the World Heritage Sites list. One of these — located on the Micronesian island of Pohnpei — is the ruins of Nan Madol. In celebration of their island treasure being recognized as a World Heritage Site, a group of local Pohnpeian college students took on the responsibility of providing the international community with their own local stories and images of Nan Madol.

1,075-Year-Old Pine Named ‘Adonis’ Is Europe’s Oldest-Known Living Tree

A Bosnian pine (Pinus heldreichii) growing in the highlands of northern Greece has been dendrocronologically dated to be more than 1,075 years old, says a team of scientists from Stockholm University (Sweden), the University of Mainz (Germany) and the University of Arizona (USA). This makes it currently the oldest-known living tree in Europe.

Stanford scientists combine satellite data and machine learning to map poverty

Researchers correctly identified impoverished areas across five African countries by using machine learning to extract information from high-resolution satellite imagery, Stanford University’s School of Earth, Energy and Environmental Sciences say in a news statement. “One of the biggest challenges in providing relief to people living in poverty is locating them,” the release states. “The availability of accurate…

Same-sex Pairing may Give Male Termites an Evolutionary Advantage, Japanese Researchers Suggest

Male Japanese termites form homosexual couples when no females are around — and when the chance arises, they take over a heterosexual couple’s nest and kill the male so that one of them can mate with the now spouseless female, scientists from Kyoto University reported in a study published this week in the research journal Animal Behaviour. The…

How Smarter Irrigation Might Save Rare Mussels and Ease a Water War

Casey Cox, who hails from a family with five generations of farming history along the Flint River in the southeastern U.S. state of Georgia, never expected to come back home. She’d graduated from the University of Florida in Gainesville with a natural resources degree. A big thinker, Cox could have taken her desire to make…

In Canada’s Boreal Forest, ‘The Land That Gives Life’ Inspires a Push for Protection

A couple works to win UNESCO recognition to help save the vast wilderness of Pimachiowin Aki and preserve a culture’s link to the Earth  For millennia, the Anishinaabe people of the Poplar River First Nation, in the Canadian province of Manitoba, have called the boreal forest that surrounds and sustains them Pimachiowin Aki: The Land…

Americans View of Climate Change Polarized; U.N. Targets May Be Tough to Achieve

Surveys conducted by Yale University and George Mason University suggest that 17 percent of Americans view climate change as an alarming threat and that another 28 percent are concerned about climate change but view it as a distant threat. The subject has become highly contentious since 1997, when then Vice President Gore helped broker an…

Care About the Ocean? Think Twice About Your Coffee Lid: Filmmaker Q&A with Justin Lewis and Michelle Stauffer

Near Bermuda in the Atlantic Ocean, currents define the Sargasso Sea—the only sea that is not defined by land boundaries. Known by some as a floating rain forest, the Sargasso Sea is named for the free-floating seaweed Sargassum and provides food and shelter for a vast variety of wildlife. However, those same currents carry a…