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The Cost of Everything and the Value of Nothing: Falling Costs Are a Game-Changer

By Lynn Scarlett, Global Managing Director for Public Policy, The Nature Conservancy For the average U.S. consumer, electricity is an unremarkable fact of their existence—when they flip the switch, the light comes on. But behind that simple act is a feat of forecasting, engineering, logistics and timing that is mind-bogglingly complex. At the heart of this process is the mix of generation sources—the different electric power plants…

Top 25 Wild Bird Photographs of the Week #88

The Wild Bird Trust presents the 88th edition of the “Top 25 Wild Bird Photographs of the Week”. Thank you to all contributing photographers and all WildBird! revolutionaries! To submit your photo for selection in the Top 25, please post your image on the Wild Bird Trust Facebook page with details on species, location and…

National Geographic Photo Ark Illuminates Endangered Species Day With Stunning Images

National Geographic Photo Ark animals “takeover” of New York’s Times Square and other major U.S. cities today, Endangered Species Day, marks the launch of the #SaveTogether campaign aimed at saving species.

For many species, time is running out. “That’s why on Endangered Species Day, the National Geographic Society and the Outdoor Advertising Association of America (OAAA), the national trade association for the out of home (OOH) advertising industry, launched a groundbreaking OOH campaign aimed at saving species at risk in the wild, NGS and OAAA say in a news release about the campaign. The key message is: “See what we can #SaveTogether before it’s too late.”

To support that campaign on Endangered Species Day, National Geographic Voices is featuring a selection of photographs from National Geographic Photo Ark, complementing the images that will “take over” Times Square and other venues.

China, India on Course to Surpass Climate Pledges, Making Up for U.S. Climate Action

Slowing coal use in China and India has put the two most populous countries on a trajectory to beat their carbon emissions goals under the Paris Agreement, making up for rollbacks in U.S. climate action under the Trump administration, according to a new analysis released by Climate Action Tracker (CAT) at intersessional climate talks concluding…

The Night Watch

In Playa Grande, Costa Rica, more than 20 years of egg poaching consumed a generation of leatherback sea turtles, bringing the population in the Eastern Pacific to the brink of extinction. Today, scientists and volunteers are working alongside local communities to ensure there’s a future for this species. When María Teresa Koberg first arrived in…

New York Marine Life Revealed at Brooklyn Photo Exhibition

“Underwater Wildlife New York,” an outdoor exhibit at Brooklyn Bridge Park by acclaimed underwater photographer Keith Ellenbogen, showcases the region’s most fascinating marine species and highlights efforts by scientists at the WCS’s New York Aquarium to study and raise awareness of the conservation needs of local marine wildlife and their habitats.

So You Want to Fly Drones for Conservation?

The latest in the Drones and Small Unmanned Aerial Systems Special Series, in which Kike profiles interesting information, research and thoughts on using drones, UAVs and remotely piloted vehicles for journalism and photography. In the recent past, drones have exploded into the public eye. A subject of constant controversy, they summon debates about personal privacy, the dynamics of political…

Te Araroa and the Increasing Popularity of Thru-Hikes

By Erika Zambello, based on an article by Dan Hawkins. New Zealand is known for breathtaking scenery, popularized in the blockbuster Lord of the Rings and The Hobbit movie series. Since 1975, citizens have been working toward a scenic, thru-hiking trail to showcase the country, culminating in an official trail that opened in 2011. Today,…

Belize’s Cockscomb Basin’s Howler Monkey Translocation Is Declared a Success

For 30 days in April and May, 2017, a team of researchers surveyed the Cockscomb Basin Wildlife Sanctuary and its surrounding environs for Central American black howler monkeys (Alouatta pigra). The Cockscomb monkeys are descended from animals that were first brought into the sanctuary 25 years ago in an effort to reintroduce howler monkeys to the area.

Can rare tropical penguins survive in the Galapagos?

The Galapagos penguin (Spheniscus mendiculus) is an endemic species, but that fact doesn’t save it from being threatened with extinction in its environment. Their nests can be found on Isabela, Fernandina, Bartolome and Floreana Islands, but their habitat is shrinking though time due to climate change and other threats.

Why Weedy Species Matter on Coral Reefs

Periodic disturbances to coral reefs increase coral diversity by creating new space for new species to colonize. Shortly after a disturbance it is usually the “weedy” species like branching Pocillopora and Acropora species that come back first. Weedy species on reefs simply refers to fast growing corals that are quick to colonize a reef after a disturbance.

Lost & Found: Nature Stories That Will Make You Smile

What can be more heartening than a species that returns from the dead? Enter the “Lost and Found” storytelling project, which is pushing the conversation around conservation away from “doom and gloom” and towards a more optimist outlook.

1Frame4Nature | The Search for Lost Species

In early 2010 I pulled together a poster of the ten “Most Wanted” amphibians that led to a global search for frogs and salamanders lost to science. A little battle-weary from the unabated extinction of frogs and their kin, and seeking hope in the face of despair, I was buoyed by the improbable reappearance in Costa Rica of the Variable Harlequin Frog and inspired to wonder: what else might be out there?

South Serbia’s Youth Look to a Future That Blurs Ethnic Division

In a Southern Serbian town known for its ethnic tensions, five teenage girls find common ground across the divide.

Impressive Lagoonal Coral Formations in a Community ‘Tabu’ Area

Lagoons have always fascinated me. The size, shape, and length of a lagoon – and the number of channels that connect inner lagoonal waters with the open ocean – influence the types of coral communities that form within. Because of the amount of sand in the lagoon that sits between the two islands of Kaibu and Yacata in northern Lau Group, I had fairly minimal expectations about what I might see. But nature has a way of surprising us, even the more seasoned coral ecologists!