VOICES Voices Icon Ideas and Insight From Explorers

Menu

Latest / page 2

DNA Reveals Unknown Ancient Migration Into India

As the Genographic Project celebrates its 10th anniversary, team scientists announce intriguing results from a study of more than 10,000 men from southern Asia.

Short Film Showcase: Backpack Through Indonesia in Under 5 Minutes

Follow these backpackers on an epic journey across Indonesia. Filmmaker Marco Santi shares highlights of his 16-day adventure in Backpackers Memahami Indonesia. Roughly translated from Indonesian, memahami means “to understand or comprehend.” Travel from the top of Gunung Bromo, an active volcano, to the depths of the Indian Ocean in this stunning short. I spoke with Santi…

10 Ways That Latin America is Driving Global Climate Action

2015 marks the 10-year anniversary of C40 Cities Climate Leadership Group. To celebrate these 10 Years of Results, we will be sharing our favorite lists of 10 throughout the year. Latin American cities have enormous potential to reduce global greenhouse gas emissions – C40 research indicates that together they could cut emissions by 2,500 MtCO2 by 2030, or the equivalent…

Earth Day Is Every Day in Palau

This week, I have traveled thousands of miles to the small Pacific island nation of Palau to celebrate Earth Day with its conservation-minded people.

Punk Rock Bird Sports Mega Mohawk

With a mohawk of feathers, a painted red face, and a diet that includes cobras, the secretary-bird is a flamboyant predator.

Protect Costa Rica’s Hammerhead Sharks from Poachers

  By Shari Sant Plummer with contributions by Courtney Mattison   Three hundred forty two miles west of mainland Costa Rica lies an oceanic island so spectacular Jacques Cousteau called it the “most beautiful island in the world.” Cascading waterfalls cut through lush foliage, the symphony of a thousand seabirds echoes in your ears, and…

BP Memories that don’t fade

April 20 marks the 5th anniversary of the BP oil disaster in the Gulf of Mexico. A federal judge has ruled that BP demonstrated “gross negligence” leading to the blowout and spill. Still BP (and former Pentagon) spokesman Geoff Morrell insists that the Gulf is now, “better than ever,” and the company is fighting claims…

One Colorado Town’s Answer to a Catch-22 of Water Conservation

A few years ago, the town of Westminster, Colorado, just north of Denver, came eye-to-eye with an issue many water-conserving cities face when a resident posed this question at a public meeting, “Why do you ask me to conserve, and then raise my rates?” With droughts dotting the country and a growing number of areas…

What’s Behind Malawi’s Decision Not to Burn Its Ivory Stockpile?

By Michael Schwartz

Malawi president Peter Mutharika recently decided to postpone the burning of roughly four tons of stockpiled ivory, worth around seven million dollars. He claimed that at least 2.6 more tons are still being held as evidence in the upcoming trials of suspected elephant poachers.

While his initial decision to destroy the ivory is being lauded by some Malawians, others question whether a burn is the best possible recourse. Some see confiscated ivory as disposable remnants of barbarism that only carry intrinsic value when attached to their owners. Others see it as revenue to help the country’s poor or to augment conservation.

This also broaches the larger debate as to whether or not destroying contraband stockpiles really helps elephants in the long run.

A SEA IN FLAMES

Though a bit imprecise, the time, approximately 9:50 p.m. on April 20, 2010, marks the end of knowing much precisely. A floating machinery system roughly the size of a forty-story hotel has for months been drilling into the sea floor in the Gulf of Mexico. Its creators have named the drilling rig “Deepwater Horizon.” Oil…

Palau: Leading by Example

If there is one country that leads by example, it’s Palau. This is a strong country, one that was a battleground for World War II, it has survived typhoons and earthquakes, and still the Palauans persevere. While their culture shows some Western influence, Palauan traditions remain steadfast. They thrive in one of the most beautiful,…

Google and the Green Economy: Lessons in Process Innovation

Guest post by Samia Mazhar Global efforts to reach a climate change agreement in Paris later this year are gaining momentum not only in the halls of some parliaments but also in the corporate world. In this guest post, an Australian scholar of project management and innovation, Samia Mazhar, explores ways one major corporate power…

3-D Modelling Corals on the Real Skull Island

On Skull Island, the skulls of head-hunting victims lie entombed beneath the skulls of their captors, while under the waves, a living treasure of coral is being enshrined digitally for all to see.

Exploring the Underground Mysteries of Socotra

Once they’d made the difficult journey to the cave entrance, the real journey began for these explorers on the trail of ancient rock art.

Keeping the Wild Yampa Wild

By Nathan Fey, Colorado Stewardship Director for American Whitewater

Cutting through the steep canyons and arid sage lands of northwestern Colorado and northeastern Utah, the Yampa is the region’s lifeblood. A major tributary of the Colorado, which has been increasingly stretched as demand exceeds supply, and climate warms and dries, the river’s flows are eyed by downstream water-users in Utah, Arizona and California. That fact behooves all of us to take a closer look at how water is managed in the West.