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Sudan Border Walk: Trekking from one pool of water to the next

For at least 4 km up from the confluence with the Chinko there is water in the Douyou. The bed is quite small and the pools are punctuated by dry river bed for about half of the way, so if it keeps up this way, we are golden.

Running Naked into the Night, Fleeing Swarm of Biting Driver Ants

I was driven from my sleep halfway, when I half-dreamt half-felt things biting my head. Then two seconds later, I knew what I was dealing with. Let’s just say, been there before. My tent was full of driver ants that were treating me like one giant piece of prey.

Big Cats on Camera

Volunteer crews with Adventurers and Scientists for Conservation have captured mountain lions, ocelots and bobcats on camera traps, and found sign of lynx and snow leopard.

From the Heart of Africa: An Introduction to William Stamps Cherry

William Stamps Cherry was the first American to set foot in deepest Africa, and the first American, if not the first hunter-explorer, to return alive from his journeys there. He had gained a name and a reputation for himself as a successful big game hunter and collector, and also as an explorer. He covered more than 30,000 miles of navigable Congo and Mobangi River tributaries (10,000 miles during his first trip working for a Dutch trading company, and 20,000 miles during his second as Chief Engineer of the entire French Marine fleet in French West Africa under Major Marchand), and was the first explorer to go deeper into the heart of deepest Africa, into the Central African Republic to the Congo’s largest tributary to the north, the Mobangi River, and then further still to the north and up the Kotto River to the headwaters and the Bahr el Ghazal.

Sudan Border Walk: Magic Amulets and Wandering Cattle Herds

Made 16 km in straight line today, Day 7. Lots of cattle and herders about. No bad encounters yet, but people very fearful and prudent.

Chasing Away Winter with Slovenia’s Mythical Kurenti

Once a year, in Slovenia’s quiet northeastern corner, a rambunctious figure is invited to roam the streets and disrupt the peace. The Kurent, an unruly God from Slavic folklore, is the centerpiece of Slovenia’s carnival celebration before Ash Wednesday. This strange character has been reimagined through time, but continues to delight locals and tourists across the country each February.

Animal neuroscientist discusses her career and the case for keeping cetaceans out of captivity

Many countries and U.S. states have recently banned the captivity of orcas and other cetaceans. Neuroscientist Lori Marino discusses what happens when these animals are kept in tanks and why she believes there is a need to bring them back into a more natural environment.

Kruger Park Finds Early Success in new System to Detect and Intercept Rhino Poachers at Night

A new mobile electronic detection system has been deployed at ground zero in the poaching onslaught on South Africa’s rhinos. Funded by Postcode Lottery charities in Europe, and developed by South African scientists, the system enables the Kruger Park’s counter-poaching unit to monitor the park in the dark, receiving alerts and a night-vision feed to track and intercept intruders before a rhino is taken. Several rhinos have already been saved, thanks to rangers being able to detect and safely intercept poachers by surprise.

Top 25 Wild Bird Photographs of the Week #79

As the majestic masters of sea, land and sky, birds of all kinds have become significant symbols in all our cultures. Many of us celebrate bird diversity every day without even knowing it. Just as every country has a flag, each nation also has a national bird. While it may be less known that the charismatic Common…

Nomadic Herders Take Their Toll on Central Africa’s Dwindling Wildlife

We were cruising along through the bush and suddenly I thought I heard voices to the west. We stopped and could see two guys walking along at a rather fast clip with 4 burros with small loads and a single very skinny cow. They didn’t see us and we waited untill they got real close to greet them: “Assalama ou aleekum,” Yaya said. “Aleekum salum”, I think they didn’t realize yet we were not fellow herders. Then they saw us and veered off.

Trump’s Detroit Visit Focuses on Fuel Standards

President Donald Trump announced in Detroit Wednesday that standards requiring automakers to nearly double the average fuel economy of new cars and trucks to 54.5 miles per gallon by 2025 will be reviewed. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) developed the standards as a single program alongside the Department of Transportation’s fuel economy rules, popularly…

Voyaging Through 4 Global Marine Treasures

We have had to adjust our course many times to travel downwind and remain focused on our destination. These lessons from sailing hold true for protecting our oceans. The first step, in either situation, is being clear about our destination.

Sudan Border Walk Team Member Rehydrates; Baboons Move in for Closer Look at Us

Today was short because I didn’t want to take any chances with Herve. I have been pumping him full of salt and sugar for the past 36 hours and he has gone from looking like death warmed over to just about his old self. It is amazing how dehydration can kill you real fast if you don’t get the electrolytes back in the system.

The Trendy Fish Diet We Can Get Behind

Everyone wants to eat healthy. Some of us try cutting carbs while others cut out sugar or go vegan. Often, we find these diets hard to sustain without the proper preparation, research and commitment to make sure we are actually eating healthy. Now, imagine trying to create a new diet for farm-raised fish. Can fish…

The Last Climb in Borneo

Sometimes things are hardest right before you reach the finish line. Then you remember that it’s not actually the finish line, it’s just the halfway point. This is an account of my last climb in Malaysian Borneo, but I’ve got many more to come in the Ecuadorean Amazon. There are times when it feels like…