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Tag archives for Africa

Large Wildlife and the Global Carbon Cycle: Studies at the Mpala Research Center

The exact nature of the relationship between large, charismatic wildlife species and the comparatively invisible carbon compounds that cycle around an ecosystem is not abundantly clear. As far as ecosystem carbon goes, it’s understood that the tiny microorganisms in soil do a lot of work, breaking down carbon compounds and releasing carbon dioxide by respiring.…

Two Cheers on World Elephant Day 2016

Things have improved since the dark days of 2011 and 2012 when ivory poaching across Africa appeared to be spiralling out of control and conservations began to contemplate the unthinkable: the extinction of the African elephant. On World Elephant Day 2016 there are grounds for cautious optimism. Nevertheless, it is too soon to assert that Africa’s elephants are safe.

Urgent Global Action Needed to Stop Extinction of Earth’s Last Megafauna

A swift and global conservation response is needed to prevent the world’s gorillas, lions, tigers, rhinos, and other iconic terrestrial megafauna from being lost forever, an influential group of international scientists reported today in the journal BioScience.

Their analysis, entitled Saving the World’s Terrestrial Megafauna, covers the precipitous loss of large animal populations around the globe. The report included a 13-point declaration by 43 scientists and conservationists calling for acknowledgement that a “business as usual” mentality will result in massive species extinction. Read the declaration and study the maps showing the global decline of big land animals.

Cecil the Lion one Year on: An Interview with Cecil’s Researcher

A year ago, a male lion called Cecil was killed in Hwange National Park, Zimbabwe, by an American trophy hunter. Cecil’s death caused uproar around the world and shone a much-needed light on the decline and vulnerability of the African lion population; today, there may be no more than 20,000 remaining in the wild. To…

A New USAID-funded Community-based Conservation Initiative Launches in Northern Tanzania

Several years ago, the African People & Wildlife Fund integrated rangeland management into its four-step process towards long-term conservation success in Tanzania. Recently, a collaboration of ten organizations kicked off a five-year project to ensure that Tanzania’s rangelands, ecosystems, and the communities within those ecosystems, are protected.  By the African People & Wildlife Fund Wildlife…

Seeking an End to the Terror of Rabies in Madagascar

Though death is preventable if vaccines are received quickly, rabies still kills with terrifying frequency, and manifests itself so violently that witnesses tend to remember a single case for years.

The tribes of Ethiopia’s Lower Omo Valley in Photographs

    The Omo River rises on the mountainous plateau of Ethiopia’s Shewan Highlands, then flows for hundreds of kilometres through lush grasslands, acacia plains and riverine forests, until it reaches Kenya’s Lake Turkana. The river’s lower valley, in the southwest corner of the country, is a wild, beautiful, remote region.  In the mud and volcanic…

Common Land, Common Ground

By Justin Adams, Global Managing Director for Lands at The Nature Conservancy. Edward Loure and The Nature Conservancy have a common story. The story is one of reducing conflict by finding common ground—in this case both literally and metaphorically. All over the world – in fact, for 2.5 billion people – lives depend on land…

Green Warriors Honored—Continued

Good tourism should help protect a place, not destroy it. Part Two of this two-part series reports on how Edward Loure of Tanzania won the Goldman Environmental Prize for protecting indigenous Maasai land-use rights against incursions by agribusiness, hunting concessions, and, of all things, ecolodges. (Part One, a previous post, reports on the Goldman winner in Puerto Rico.)

Surf’s Up For Wildlife

New research published in the journal Ecology finds that a wide-variety of fish and wildlife are professional surfers. But don’t expect to see these animals in the next remake of Point Break, they don’t surf waves of water; they surf waves of food, and it may be their only way to make a good living.…

What does the Endangered Species Listing Mean for Lions?

In late December last year, the African lion received a special gift from the U.S. government. Over the past few years, non-profit groups, the national and international public, and the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service itself, have been rallying the government to protect lions under the Endangered Species Act. And just in time for Christmas…

Africa’s Rangers at the Frontline of the Poaching War

They are waging a war that is relentless, unforgiving and uncompromising in nature and that is taking its toll physically and emotionally. All conservation efforts in Africa will amount to very little without a well skilled, resourced, dedicated and motivated field force. It is high time that we all rise up and recognize the crucial role that these heroes play and we must support them in every way possible!

150,000 trees planted to protect lions

By Jeremy Swanson On this World Wildlife Day, we reflect on the past, look at the present, and talk about our dreams for the future, of lions and their roars in Tanzania and East Africa.     In protecting lions and supporting communities through Living Walls, the African People & Wildlife Fund (APW) can now…

Saving Rüppell’s Vultures, One Breeding Cliff at a Time

Breeding cliff of critically endangered Rüppell’s Vultures in Kenya is threatened by development

A Big Year for African Wildlife: Seven Milestones of 2015

With the closing of 2015 comes the end of a big chapter for Africa and its spectacular wildlife. Looking back on the year, we reflect on the big wins and big changes for wildlife conservation in this huge, unique continent. Here are the top seven milestones for African wildlife in 2015. By Deirdre Leowinata The U.S. Government listed…