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Tag archives for Africa

Chobe lions: A Transboundary Conundrum

Post submitted by Lise Hanssen, Project Coordinator of Kwando Carnivore Project. Corridors, connectivity, dispersal, tolerance, land-use, mosaic, communities – these are the terms that often describe the ability for lions to persist in a landscape shared with people and their livestock. The reality of lion conservation is that the areas in between protected areas are as…

Cheetah Matchmaking: Helping Big Cats Find a Mate

You may not have had “cheetah matchmaker” featured at your high school career fair, but that’s just what Vincent van der Merwe’s business card may as well read. But trying to repopulate the highly vulnerable species can be as dangerous as it is exciting. Watch the video to see what happens when van der Merwe tries to translocate a very unhappy cheetah across South Africa.

Pride in our Prides: Cutting-Edge Technology Protects Lions, Livestock and Livelihoods

Post submitted by Barbara Cozzens In the mid-morning hours of May 2016, a dominant male lion named “Nduraghumbo” ambles through Botswana’s cattle-trodden grasses, unaware he has just crossed an invisible barrier. Just as he does, a text message comes in to Dr. Andrew Stein’s phone: Nduraghumbo has entered Gunotsoga. Geofence 1 break time: 1025hr. Coordinates:…

How Music Inspires and Empowers Rural Africans to Steward Their Environment

The Power Of Music We all have a song that we never forget. Maybe it carried us through tough times. Or perhaps it reminds us of good times we’ve had. It may have taught us an important lesson… maybe even at just the right time in our life. Whatever the reason, it stays with us.…

Carnivore Conservation: Preserving Africa’s Disappearing Lion Population

National Geographic Emerging Explorer Thandiwe Mweetwa on a mission to track down lions. This carnivore conservationist has dedicated her life to preserving Africa’s disappearing lion population.

Building home and friendship in Africa

Safina Center Kalpana Launchpad Fellow Kate Thompson sends her dispatches from the field in Tanzania back home to New York.

A Flaw in the Plan

What happens when progressive laws confront an industrial reality? This is a story of a small community coming to grips with an steel giant.

It’s Time to Give Nature the Credit It Deserves

By Andrea Erickson, Managing Director, Water Security, The Nature Conservancy Nature is often admired for its beauty, but rarely for the critical role it plays in moving, storing and filtering water before it comes out of our taps. Rivers, lakes, soil, plants and trees serve as our most basic water infrastructure. While investments in gray…

Challenging Perceptions, Part 2

Joburg doesn’t have a stellar reputation, but people like Michael Luptak and the organization he co-founded, Dlala Nje, are trying to change that. The following podcast is a (brief) look at their story.

Using Technology to Combat Wildlife Crime

“Wildlife rangers now have the help they’ve desperately needed.” says Colby Loucks, WWF’s wildlife crime technology lead. “This groundbreaking technology allows them to search for poachers 24 hours a day, from up to a mile away, in pitch darkness. It’s upping the game in our fight to stop wildlife crime across the region.”

Where I Was When I Heard the News

My surreal experience of Donald Trump’s election, far away from America When Donald J. Trump was elected President of the United States, I was sitting in a tin-roofed, dirt-floored cafe on the shore of Lake Victoria, in a bustling Kenyan fishing village called Usenge, waiting for a ferry and watching the sun rise. It should…

The Lost History of South Africa

The strange creature is half antelope and half bird. Painted in jet black, frozen in flight on the wall, the animal has the hind legs and tail of a buck, and the magnificent wings of a raven that spread out from its shoulders. Above the flying figure, a long scaly reptile with crocodile-like ridges stretches…

Could Climate Change Keep Kids Out of School?

By Lisa Palmer

Education is seen as a key tool for building resilience to climate change in the developing world. But new research shows that climate change could also make it harder to keep kids in school and ensure they get the best out of their time in the classroom.

Heather Randell, a postdoctoral fellow at the National Socio-Environmental Synthesis Center, a research institute funded by the National Science Foundation and the University of Maryland, studies the relationships between environmental change, development, and human health and wellbeing. Her research focuses on the social processes underlying migration, the links between development and rural livelihoods, and the social and health impacts of environmental change.

Challenging Perceptions: Part 1

Here’s a screenshot my friend sent me before I arrived in Joburg. It sums up what I had heard a few times about the city:  There’s some truth to the narrative that Johannesburg is unsafe. The fences struck me right away. Nearly every house has a fence around it, most topped by barbed (and sometimes…

World body that could protect elephants—decides not to

Acutely, an elephant’s problem is ivory. Chronically the problem is shrinking space. Rich or poor, humans seem too much of a good thing. One wonders where this trend of growing human numbers and appetites, afflicting elephants and humans alike, is headed.