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Sudan Border Walk Team Member Rehydrates; Baboons Move in for Closer Look at Us

Today was short because I didn’t want to take any chances with Herve. I have been pumping him full of salt and sugar for the past 36 hours and he has gone from looking like death warmed over to just about his old self. It is amazing how dehydration can kill you real fast if you don’t get the electrolytes back in the system.

Sudan Border Walk: Team Member Falls Ill

We took a rest at a spot where we were next to the Chinko, and when we getting up I could see Herve was walking real slow. I said, you are walking like an old man. He said “stomach worms are bothering me, I have been throwing up”. He looked like hell.

Sudan Border Walk: Further Into the Unknown

Seems like we have been on the trail for a long time now. That is a good thing. It means we are in the rhythm of the walk. What has been left behind is left behind and when you get up in the morning you can’t wait to go because you are going ever deeper into the unknown.

Sudan Border Walk, Day 2

The guys were not super happy to get out of bed this morning after the first-day walk blues from yesterday. It is not the distance, it is the weight. We crossed the Chinko right away to avoid a creek on our side. Turns out it was a mistake, the grass hadn’t been burned on the opposite side, which makes going ten times slower.

Sudan Border Walk, Day One

We camped out with the Chinko Project Team. They left us at the confluence of the Chinko and the Mboutou. This is as far as the dirt track leads, from there to the South Sudan border it is foot only.

Heart of Africa Expedition Resumes

Africa explorer-conservationist J. Michael Fay is in the Central African Republic for the next six weeks, completing an expedition he started in 2014, retracing as best he can the footsteps of the 19th Century American Game Hunter-Explorer William Stamps Cherry. Fay, a former National Geographic Explorer-in-Residence and recipient of numerous National Geographic Society grants, has also worked for decades for the Wildlife Conservation Society. His transects through some of Africa’s remote wildernesses (Megatransect and Meglaflyover) rank among the most significant in the history of exploration of the continent.

Will Africa’s Big Five become extinct in the wild?

On World Wildlife Day 2017, a reflection and celebration in photography from the National Geographic Photo Ark of Africa’s Big Five: Lion, leopard, elephant, rhinoceros, and buffalo. A century ago these species were among the millions of wild animals roaming Africa. But now their numbers are dwindling, leaving us to wonder if a hundred years from now they will be extinct in the wild.

Where Have Zimbabwe’s Cheetahs Gone?

Post submitted by Alex Rudee Esther van der Meer looks right at home amid all the five-star luxuries of the Victoria Falls Hotel. As she relaxes in a wicker chair on the red-brick porch of the famous resort, Esther seems for all the world like just another high-end tourist soaking up the African sun. Donning…

Population Effects From Snared Lion Rescues

Post submitted by Zamiban Carnivore Programme. Photo by Luke Dollar

Chobe lions: A Transboundary Conundrum

Post submitted by Lise Hanssen, Project Coordinator of Kwando Carnivore Project.  Photo (above) by Luke Dollar Corridors, connectivity, dispersal, tolerance, land-use, mosaic, communities – these are the terms that often describe the ability for lions to persist in a landscape shared with people and their livestock. The reality of lion conservation is that the areas in…

Cheetah Matchmaking: Helping Big Cats Find a Mate

You may not have had “cheetah matchmaker” featured at your high school career fair, but that’s just what Vincent van der Merwe’s business card may as well read. But trying to repopulate the highly vulnerable species can be as dangerous as it is exciting. Watch the video to see what happens when van der Merwe tries to translocate a very unhappy cheetah across South Africa.

Pride in our Prides: Cutting-Edge Technology Protects Lions, Livestock and Livelihoods

Post submitted by Barbara Cozzens In the mid-morning hours of May 2016, a dominant male lion named “Nduraghumbo” ambles through Botswana’s cattle-trodden grasses, unaware he has just crossed an invisible barrier. Just as he does, a text message comes in to Dr. Andrew Stein’s phone: Nduraghumbo has entered Gunotsoga. Geofence 1 break time: 1025hr. Coordinates:…

How Music Inspires and Empowers Rural Africans to Steward Their Environment

The Power Of Music We all have a song that we never forget. Maybe it carried us through tough times. Or perhaps it reminds us of good times we’ve had. It may have taught us an important lesson… maybe even at just the right time in our life. Whatever the reason, it stays with us.…

Carnivore Conservation: Preserving Africa’s Disappearing Lion Population

National Geographic Emerging Explorer Thandiwe Mweetwa on a mission to track down lions. This carnivore conservationist has dedicated her life to preserving Africa’s disappearing lion population.

Building home and friendship in Africa

Safina Center Kalpana Launchpad Fellow Kate Thompson sends her dispatches from the field in Tanzania back home to New York.