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See-Through Frogs With Green Bones Discovered in Peru

Researchers discover four new species of frog in the Peruvian Andes, three of which are see-through.

The Hunt for Alpaca … Skeletons

Sarah Kennedy is using animal remains to dig through Peru’s colonial past. By comparing bone shards from Peru’s northern coast to an alpaca skeleton from Cusco, she might be able to show what Peruvians ate under Spanish rule.

Reciprocal Water Agreements for Watershed Protection

By Keith Alger, Senior Vice President, Latin America, Rare What starts uphill runs downhill, and in countries with mountainous terrain like the high Andes this can mean pollutants from upstream running into drinking water supplies in the valley. Take Colombia—one of the most biodiverse countries in the world; number one in orchid species with over…

Biologists Find “Extinct” Andean Toad Alive and Well

A rare toad species long thought extinct turns up in an Ecuadorian forest.

Corridors to Survival: Charting a Path to Combat Climate Change in the Tropics

New findings from Woods Hole Research Center scientists use satellite data to recommend habitat corridors between protected areas in the tropics to promote long-term conservation. The concept of habitat corridors in conservation has been around for a while. It’s a topic at global climate talks and an issue for NGOs eager to create pathways for…

New Species of Fuzzy Daisy and Other Furry Flora

A new species of fuzzy daisy discovered in the Venezuelan Andes joins a cadre of fuzzy flora.

July 7, 2013: Falling 1,000 Feet off The Andes, Saving The Great Barrier Reef, and More

Join National Geographic Weekend radio this week, as we survive a 1,000 foot fall from the Bolivian Andes, then we explore Mars with NASA’S Curiosity Rover, and finally, we team up with Afghanistan’s national cycling team to provide opportunity (and bikes) for women.

May 5, 2013: An Ambush on the Amazon, Croc Attacks in Africa and More

This week on National Geographic Weekend, host Boyd Matson chats with adventurer Davey du Plessis who attempted to ride the Amazon River from source to sea but was attacked in a random ambush by gunmen; Nat Geo water fellow Sandra Postel discusses the fate of the Amazon River; and an Australian croc wrangler goes to Africa to try to track a river beast.

Amazon Waters: Conserving Wildlife, Securing Livelihoods

Threats to the Amazon come not only from deforestation, but also from dams, roads, human-induced climate change, gold mining, petroleum extraction, shipping and the unplanned growth of cities, whose expanding populations consume more and more of the Amazon River’s resources.

October 28, 2012: Love in the Northwest Passage, Giant Predators in Prehistoric Australia, and More

This week on National Geographic Weekend, join host Boyd Matson as we sail a wooden yacht through the frozen Northwest Passage, dine with vultures in Turkey, discover life in an undersea desert in Gabon, remember the 18 fallen tigers in last year’s Zanesville, Ohio tragedy, dodge tree crocodiles and carnivorous kangaroos in prehistoric Australia, feed some birds and try not to get killed, paddle down Alaska’s Tanana River, and save macaws by making traditional headdresses (with synthetic feathers).

August 5, 2012: Speed Scaling El Capitan, Teaching Women to Film in Afghanistan, and More

This week on “National Geographic Weekend,” join host Boyd Matson as we set a speed record on Yellowstone’s El Capitan, help Native North Americans rediscover their culture and tell their own stories, save physics with LSD, survey the wreckage of Japan’s tsunami on Washington’s coast, walk the length of the Andes, start a revolution in the Middle East by using photography, speak the language of London’s east side, and find America’s best beaches.

The Key to Addressing Climate Change – Indigenous Knowledge

We have the knowledge that can contribute to finding solutions to the crisis of climate change. But if you’re not prepared to listen, how can we communicate this to you? — Marcos Terena, Xané leader, Brazil. The precipitous rise in the world’s human population and humankind’s ever-increasing dependence on fossil fuel-based ways of living have…

Peruvians Protest Gold Mine Construction

Peruvian President Ollanta Humala announced a state of emergency in parts of the country early in December in response to protests over the construction of a huge gold mine in Cajamarca, reported CNN; the state of emergency was lifted in mid-December. The protesters cite potential adverse environmental effects on water and agriculture. The U.S. Denver-based Newmont Mining Corp., which…

Exquisite Views of Patagonia’s Wetlands

From close-up views of unusual flowers, to rodent’s-eye-views of the world where moss is grass and grass is forest, to epic landscapes seen only by a camera attached to a kite, Anand Varma’s photographs reveal Patagonia not as it would appear if you were there, but as it would appear if you were everywhere.

Carving my Dreams into a Gourd: Mother Earth & Climate Change

Irma Luz Poma Canchumani (Quechua) is a traditional gourd-carver whose work is featured in the exhibition Conversations with the Earth : Indigenous Voices on Climate Change at the Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian (Washington, DC) from July 22, 2011 through January 2, 2012. Mrs. Canchumani also participates in the exhibition as a video producer.…