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Tag archives for Antarctic

International Leadership, a Global Community, and Renewed Hope: Protecting the Ross Sea, Antarctica

Last week we made history when countries came together to adopt the world’s largest marine protected area (MPA) in one of our most productive and healthy stretches of ocean: the Ross Sea, Antarctica. This feat cannot be understated. It was the culmination of the dogged efforts of hundreds of scientists, thousands of conservationists, and millions…

Antarctic Ice-Sheet Collapse Could Trigger Rapid Sea-Level Rise

A study published in Nature finds that Antarctic ice-sheet collapse driven by greenhouse gas emissions could double the sea-level rise predicted for this century—from 3.2 feet according to a three-year-old United Nations estimate to upward of 6.5 feet by 2100. The research builds on the work of other recent studies pointing to an irreversible melting…

July 27, 2014 Radio Show: Curing Cancer, Spending Summer Nights With Fireflies and More

This week on National Geographic Weekend, join host Boyd Matson and his guests as they invent a cheap cancer detection system, scour the earth’s poles for adventure, ingratiate themselves with a cheetah family, give the facts on fireflies, conjure life from the fangs of a viper, feed Africa from Africa, roadtrip across the United States in comfort, and photograph National Geographic’s past.

Pictures: Inside Scandinavia’s Biggest Icebreaker

Take a look inside the Oden, the 351-foot (107-meter) Swedish vessel that pulverizes ice and helps polar scientists do their jobs.

April 6, 2014: Riding Horses Across Continents, Swimming in the Arctic Ocean and More

Every week, embark with host Boyd Matson on an exploration of the latest discoveries and interviews with some of the most fascinating people on the planet, on National Geographic Weekend. Please check listings near you to find the best way to listen to National Geographic Weekend on radio, or listen below! Hour 1 – Filipe Masetti left Calgary, Alberta on horseback nearly two…

March 24, 2014: Big Wave Crashes, Haitian Folk-Tunes, Babysitting Gorillas and More

Join radio host Boyd Matson every week for adventure, conservation and green science. This week they are held underwater until they blackout and are rescued, put Langston Hughes’ poetry to music, study bats in the living room, grow up with gorillas, survive a deadly Antarctic expedition, remind travelers to represent their nations, refuse to order bluefin tuna sushi, and create stronger laws to protect elephants.

Report: Current Efforts to Slow Global Warming Not Sufficient

Days before world leaders meet in Warsaw, Poland, for the latest United Nations Climate Change Conference, a new report warns that the opportunity to limit global temperature increases to 2 degrees Celsius compared with preindustrial levels is diminishing. The “Emissions Gap Report 2013,” compiled yearly by the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), looks at how each nation is meeting its…

Slow Progress in Protecting Polar Waters

  Yesterday, I talked about the justification for imposing new requirements on ships that operate in polar waters. The good news is that countries with major presences in the Arctic and Antarctic agree that such requirements are necessary, and over the past decade have made slow but steady progress towards creating them. The bad news…

Little-known Code Could Have a Major Impact on Polar Environments

Scientists recently identified multiple new trans-Arctic shipping routes that will be accessible to non-ice-strengthened vessels in just a few decades., Given that such routes would have been unimaginable a few decades ago, this research is yet another sobering reminder of the massive changes that anthropogenic climate change has caused. At the other end of the…

How Climate Change is Causing Antarctic Sea-ice to Expand

As rising temperatures continue to shrink the extent of Arctic summer sea-ice, there has been much speculation as to why the ice cover on the opposite side of the planet has expanded slightly in recent years. Now British scientists have found the explanation–and it’s related to climate change. Using data gathered by U.S. military satellite-tracking…

That’s One Stale Biscuit

How much would you spend for a 104-year-old biscuit? What if it was all that stood between you and starvation in the heart of the Antarctic?

Conservation is Working, but One in Five Animals is Running Out of Time

Do we need to double our conservation efforts? One fifth of the world’s vertebrates–mammals, birds, amphibians, reptiles and fishes–is threatened with extinction, according to a worldwide assessment by thousands of scientists. But had it not been for conservation measures, they say, the number of species on the threatened list would be doubled. Legislation enacted to ban…

Climate Change a Trojan Horse for Alien Species Invasion?

Changing climate conditions and the massive invasions of exotic species introduced by human migration and the global economy are two of the biggest factors driving native species and habitats toward extinction. Now a new study finds that the combination of climate change and invasive species is compounding the devastation of ecosystems. Two of the greatest threats to the…

Time for a surge in whale conservation

By Frederick M. O’Regan Our planet’s great whales and those who care about them can breathe a bit easier following last month’s meeting of the International Whaling Commission (IWC), in Agadir, Morocco. A controversial proposal advanced by the Chair and Vice Chair of the IWC would have rewritten rules to resuscitate the whaling industry in…

Atlas of Global Conservation maps human impact on planet

For Earth Day 2010, The Nature Conservancy and University of California Press have published The Atlas of Global Conservation, their attempt to collect “everything we know about nature on planet Earth.” The book includes a hundred maps and charts, as well as essays by leading conservation thinkers that put the information in its larger context, The…