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Tag archives for Antarctica

Tracking Antarctica

The largest wilderness on Earth – Antarctica is also the most isolated continent. The oceans around Antarctica are some of the most pristine in the world with more than 8,000 marine species, more than half of which are seen nowhere else in the world. However, this epic wonder is under pressure. Parts of the Antarctic…

Antarctic invertebrates: cheaters, kidnappers and possibly lifesavers?

This past March, I had the privilege to visit the Antarctic Peninsula with One Ocean Expeditions as part of a discussion among Antarctic stakeholders on the future of Antarctica. I enjoyed seeing all the typical Antarctic animals – penguins, whales, and seals – but a real highlight was getting to meet Dr. Bill Baker at…

Study: Glacial Lakes Appearing in Antarctica

Antarctica is home to Earth’s largest ice mass, which unlike the Arctic remains frozen year round. But a new satellite-based study in the journal Geophysical Research Letters shows that atop the coastal Langhovde Glacier in East Antarctica’s Dronning Maud Land, large numbers of meltwater lakes have been forming. The study suggests that the lakes—nearly 8,000…

Natural Fluctuations Responsible, in Part, for Antarctica Ice Growth

Natural fluctuations specifically related to the Interdecadal Pacific Oscillation (IPO) are responsible for the increased growth of Antarctic sea ice, according to a new study in the journal Nature Geoscience. A negative shift in the IPO has caused cooler-than-average sea surface temperatures in the Eastern Pacific, allowing Antarctic sea ice to expand since 2000. “The…

Leopard Seal vs. Leopard Seal—Underwater Food Fight

We know that leopard seals are large, formidable predators, but exactly what they’re doing below the waterline has long remained a mystery. But now, thanks to National Geographic grantee Douglas Krause, we’re getting an underwater glimpse into leopard seals’ carnivorous lives—and the seal-on-seal battles are a sight to behold.

Tagging Adorable, Nasty Little Penguins: #bestjobever

The world has had a love affair with penguins for some time now. Their tuxedo-colored feathers, waddling walk, and awkward mannerisms make them easy to adore. But get too close to penguins—chinstrap penguins in particular—and your endearing perception of these birds may be tested, given their penchant for projectile pooping and beating each other up.

When Ice Melts: Tipping the Scales in the Predator/Prey Arms Race in Antarctica

The Lindblad Expeditions-National Geographic (LEX-NG) Fund aims to protect the last wild places in the ocean while facilitating conservation, research, education, and community development programs in the places we explore. This blog entry spotlights some of the exciting work our grantees are doing with support from the LEX-NG Fund. A man is poised with a…

A Plea for Adélie (Penguins)

Last week in an obscure stone building in Hobart Tasmania, representatives from 24 nations plus the European Union, sat in stiff dark suits around a large table, making decisions that will determine the fate of one of our great global commons, the Southern Ocean. They discussed proposals for expansive marine protected areas, including in the…

Think Fast: What Bird Is This?

Artist and science illustrator Jane Kim is painting all 241 modern bird families on a giant mural at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology. Learn how she captures details that make each species unique.

Ross Island 2014: Journey’s End

Ken Sims’ expedition to Ross Island in Antarctica is wrapping up. Having narrowly obtained the samples he needed, Ken reflects on the dangers endured in this remote ice-desert for the sake of science and exploration.

Antarctica 2014: Success at Lewis Bay

Join Ken Sims as he tackles perilous ice-encrusted volcanoes in the attempt to study their geological past in Antarctica.

October 12, 2014: Fighting South Pole Frostbite, Bathing Elephants and More

This week on National Geographic Weekend radio, join host Boyd Matson and his guests as they survive frostbite on the frozen continent, explore Haiti’s marine culture, bathe an elephant, bobsled with British champions, dance with Birds of Paradise, learn the Secrets of the National Parks, and discover what has been hiding in Vietnam’s jungles.

August 31, 2014: Diving Deep For Bioluminescence, Mixing Climate Change With Music and More

This week on National Geographic Weekend, join host Boyd Matson and his guests as they dodge whales and pirates on the Indian Ocean, track poachers in Africa, find lost societies in Orkney, shed light on glowing sharks, harmonize with melting ice in Antarctica, live underwater for 31 days, follow in the pawprints of a lone wolf for 1,200 miles, and rove across the red planet.

Shackleton Comic Brings Antarctica’s Heroic Age of Exploration to Life

A century ago, Ernest Shackleton planned the first trek from shore to shore across Antarctica. During their journey, he and the crew aboard the Endurance became stranded in ice along the Antarctic coast and nearly perished. Now their story is being told in a beautiful new graphic novel from artist Nick Bertozzi. The comic showcases their…

Adventure Science in Antarctica

Lisa White started alpine climbing five years ago when a friend asked her to climb Mt. Rainier in her home state of Washington. The ability to experience part of the mountain where few people reach and the sense of accomplishment drew Lisa to mountaineering.  Soon she and her husband were looking for the next challenge, and…