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Tag archives for Arctic

Top 10 Ocean Conservation Victories of 2016

From wars, to politics, to the deaths of eminent artists, 2016 was a year many people were eager to see end. It was also another record breaking year for the dangerous warming of our planet. Yet, despite that thick layer of doom, humanity came together in inspiring ways – for water protection, for refugees, for…

Obama calls for a chilling on drilling in the Arctic

What President Obama’s decision on oil and gas leases in the Arctic means for life on Earth.

U.S., Canada Ban Arctic Drilling

Invoking the so-called 12(a) provision of the 1953 Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act, President Obama announced a permanent ban on offshore oil and gas drilling in more than 100 million acres of the Atlantic and Arctic. The ban affects oil and gas drilling in the Chukchi Sea and most of the Beaufort Sea off Alaska…

Changes Likely at Department of Energy under Trump Administration

The possible energy agenda for U.S. President-elect Donald Trump is described in a memo prepared by Trump’s energy transition head Thomas Pyle, the president of the American Energy Alliance and the Institute for Energy Research. It highlights a “pro-energy and pro-market policies” agenda. At the top of the list of 14 policy changes is withdrawal…

Art Amidst Disaster: Welcome to Microplastic Beach

“No amount of studies I’d read could prepare me for landing on a beach with no other humans in sight and cleaning up kilo after kilo of waste, so much of it miniscule.”—Maya Weeks

Report: Climate Change’s Transformation of Arctic Has Cascading Effects

Climate-change-related environmental, ecological, and social changes in the Arctic are accelerating and are more extreme than ever recorded, undermining the sustainability of current ways of life in the region and potentially destabilizing climate and ecosystems around the world, according to a five-year report released last week by the Arctic Council, an intergovernmental organization formed to…

WILDSCREEN 2016: The Role of Photography in Natural History Storytelling

  In a cinema on the harbour in Bristol, we were shown two images: one of an urban fox standing on a stone wall in suburbia, ears pricked, head low, amber eyes staring at the camera, and the other, of an endangered Bornean orangutan climbing a tree deep in the rain forest of Gunung Palung…

Climate, and the Dividing Line Between Forest and Tundra

In northern Alaska’s Brooks Range, the earth as most of us know it comes to an end. From Fairbanks, the northernmost city on the North American road grid, drive up the graveled Dalton Highway. Unpeopled boreal forest stretches in all directions. About 200 miles on, you pass the arctic circle, beyond which the sun never sets in midsummer, nor rises in midwinter.…

Changing Arctic: On Board Healy Icebreaker

The newest and most technologically advanced polar icebreaker in the United States fleet is the US Coast Guard icebreaker Healy. The Healy is involved in research in the Arctic, where 80 crew members and 50 scientists are often at sea for weeks on end.

Paris Agreement Closer to Being Ratified

Thirty-one new countries formally agreed to join the Paris Agreement to reduce global emissions—bringing the total committed countries to 60. The Paris Agreement takes effect when it is formally adopted by at least 55 countries representing at least 55 percent of global greenhouse gas emissions. Yet, so far, these 60 country commitments only account for 48…

Release of Carbon from Melting Permafrost Could Trigger Rapid Warming

A study published last week in Nature Geoscience provides the first measurements of greenhouse gases from permafrost under Arctic lakes in Alaska, Siberia, and Canada. Although the research reveals that only a small amount of old carbon has been released in the past 60 years, it also suggests that much more could be released as…

Diving Deep Below Arctic Ice to Bring Back Our Ocean’s Skeletons: #bestjobever

Polar expeditions to explore the ocean are not for the faint of heart. Above the water’s surface, you better be on alert for polar bears. Below, you better be game for diving 60 feet under sea ice into freezing temperatures. Watch National Geographic grantee Branwen Williams lead a team to the Canadian Arctic to do both in an effort to better understand how our oceans and the climate are changing over time.

Heaven Is a Hole of Dirt

In the final stretch of the season’s excavations, Tanja becomes super excited when she discovers a jaw piece of an Omphalosaurus—a strange reptile that would shock dentists round the world.

It’s a Nice Day for a Mud Wedding

What better place to say your vows than surrounded by your best friends and sea monster fossils on a nearly frozen island?

Another Hill Bites The Dust

Snow, rain and wind may break our bones, but will never defeat us. Every inch of shale we remove to uncover fossilised bones, is a small victory for science. New species and discoveries are hiding in the mountain and we are full of excitement. Excavating a 247 million year old bone bed can be challenging,…