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Tag archives for Asia

How Much Food Does a Thai Elephant Eat in a Day?

During my time traveling in Thailand to explore the unique relationship between humans and elephants, I had to wonder: what does it take to feed one of these giants?

Does Jakarta Have any Viable Options to Defend Itself From Ocean Inundation?

JAKARTA, Indonesia–Walking along the wall that protects north Jakarta from the sea, it is impossible to ignore the enormity–and immediacy–of water-related issues that this megacity faces. The city’s current plan of action, outlined by Wendy Koch in a recent article entitled, “Could a Titanic Seawall Save this Quickly Sinking City?,” is widely criticized as being…

Urban Gardens Frame Life in Jakarta

RUSUN MARUNDA, Jakarta–I grew up in east Tennessee where food is love and the Farmer’s Almanac is mandatory reading. A deep-rooted love for digging in the dirt and watching a seed transform to seedling to fruit is something I carry with me always. So when I came across Pak Bambang diligently tending to his garden…

Jakarta Family Finds Housing Stability Is Costly

RUSUN MARUNDA, Jakarta– Born in Central Java, Ibu Mawar*, 46, moved to Indonesia’s capital city with her parents when she was a young child. Regardless of the struggles of relocating and building a new life in the big city, she enjoyed a typical childhood living along the banks of the Cisadane River. While attending school and playing…

It Takes Time.

I slip off my shoes at the door and take a seat on the floor of her living room. It is maybe 10 degrees cooler inside than the 90+ degree (F) heat outside. She offers water and a welcoming smile. I ask how long she has lived in her current home; where she lived before;…

Drawing Out a City: The Basics.

Whether documenting or depicting, we make certain assumptions, even if only temporarily. To draw a city–to construct a city over time–essential structural elements are often the starting point. Places for public gathering, resource and transportation hubs, and (most often) natural elements–rivers, lakes, oceans, and mountains– lay the framework for the city. These points, nodes, or primary…

WATCH: Billions of Bugs Feast on Flesh and Dung in Borneo

Just in time for Halloween, follow cave ecologist and National Geographic grantee Donald McFarlane through Borneo’s “Cockroach Cave,” where every surface vibrates with cockroaches and other guano-grubbing and flesh-feasting creepy-crawlies.

Unsurprisingly, American Explorer Terrible at Milking Cows

Cross-cultural explorer and National Geographic grantee Chris Bashinelli tried to live as Mongolian nomad for a month and found himself face-to-butt with the nomads’ livestock. He quickly discovered that “when your face is a few inches from a cow’s teat and a few feet away from the cow’s kicking legs, it isn’t exactly the most comforting environment.”

Nomads of Dolpo

It is one of the last nomadic trading caravans in the world.  For more than a thousand years, the Dolpo-pa people of Nepal have depended for their survival on a biannual journey across the Himalayas. Once the summer harvest is over, the people of Dolpo sew flags and red pommels into the ears of their yaks,…

New Snow Leopard Equipped With GPS Collar in Mongolia

Post submitted by Matthias Fiechter.

Women Lead on Conservation in Nepal

“Women do most of the work in rural communities, they are the ones collecting firewood or fodder from the forests or fetching water from the faraway spring. Given how connected women are to nature, they are the most knowledgeable about natural resources and their connection to better livelihoods. Communities without empowered women are missing the backbone that strengthens them and helps them climb out of poverty.”

Americans Compete With Asian Local Markets For Blue Crab

Last week, I traveled to Kien Giang Province in southern Vietnam to learn about the Vietnamese blue swimming crab fishery. Since 2009 a cross-sector partnership of government agencies, exporters, and WWF-Vietnam have been dealing with contentious issues related to the sustainability of this stock. In discussions with this coalition, I was struck by the contrast…

Poachers of Pangolins

The pangolin is the world’s most highly-traded mammal, with more than a million being poached from the wild over the last decade, but most people are not aware such an animal even exists. iLCP Fellow Paul Hilton urges us to pay attention to the decimation of the pangolin, before it is too late.

CITES and confiscated elephant ivory and rhino horn – to destroy or not destroy?

Over the past 24 months we have seen a number of countries, including Belgium, Chad, China, Hong Kong SAR, China, Czech Republic, Gabon, France, Philippines, and the USA, destroy stockpiles of illegally traded elephant ivory and rhino horn that have been seized and confiscated. I have been invited by national CITES authorities to witness several…

Castles in the Air: Experiences and Journeys in Unknown Bhutan

One hundred years ago, in 1914, National Geographic published its first article about the Himalayan kingdom of Bhutan: a compelling account of surveys of the region by John Claude White, a British Empire administrator and explorer. Profusely illustrated with his own photographs, White’s report lifted the veil on a mysterious land hidden in the world’s highest mountains.