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Tag archives for Asia

Scenes from the Philippines: Post-earthquake, Post-typhoon

Guest blog by Dr. Amanda Vincent, Director and Co-founder of Project Seahorse  It’s been an incredibly difficult few weeks for the central Philippines. Following a 7.2 magnitude earthquake last month that caused considerable loss of lives and homes, the Visayas region was hit on Nov. 7th by Typhoon Haiyan (a.k.a. Yolanda), one of the very strongest…

November 3, 2013: How to Survive an Avalanche, Following Family History Through Asia and More

Join host Boyd Matson, as we survive potentially disastrous avalanche, swim with manta rays in Mozambique, walk the length of Africa looking for water, and follow our family tree’s roots throughout Asia.

Dolphin Slaughter Fueled by Illegal Shark Trade

The raging demand for shark meat in Asia has indirectly created another victim in our oceans: dolphins.

What’s a Danajon Bank?

by Michael Ready, Associate Fellow at the International League of Conservation Photographers In April 2013, after four planes, a ferry, and two outriggers, I arrived at Handumon, a remote village and field station on Jandayan Island in the Philippines. As I lay down the first night under a mosquito net, wiped out and bit disoriented,…

Why the World Bank Is Saving Tigers

For a financial institution that strives to end world poverty, it might seem surprising that the World Bank is involved with tiger conservation. The idea is that poverty cannot be eradicated without a sustainable environment that supports not just human life, but other species. Global Tiger Initiative team leader Andrey Kushlin discusses the challenges and victories in the Bank’s quest to double the world’s wild tiger population.

Asia: 10 lessons learned with the heart of a photographer

My mind races. It is five AM and I have not fallen asleep. I am awake after traveling from Bangkok to Tokyo, and from Tokyo to New York. It has been weeks that I have been touring Asia, with many lessons learned. Happy to report there have been no mishaps in any of the expeditions so far.…

Dreams of the World: Apsara Dancer from Siem Reap (Cambodia)

  This post is the latest in the series Dreams of the World, which profiles interesting people we meet during our travels. “It looked like a girl from the sky. The most beautiful image I had seen” said Sophea-Kagna Ieu, 47, about the first time she saw a classical Apsara ballerina delicately positioning her arms and…

Celebrating the Ingenious Skills of Tribes

From the hunting peoples of Canada to the hunter-gatherers of Africa, tribal peoples have found ingenious ways of surviving over thousands of years. For many tribal peoples, continuous immersion in nature over thousands of years has resulted in a profound attunement to the subtle cues of the natural world. Acute observations have taught tribes how…

Dreams of the World: Sarangi Player from Pokhara (Nepal)

This post is the latest in the series Dreams of the World, which profiles interesting people we meet during our travels. “My dream is to continue playing the Sarangi. I belong to the Gandharwa , a musician cast. Both my mother and father played the same instrument, a four-stringed violin-like instrument.  About 300 years ago my cast, the Gandharwa , delivered…

Sumatra Sanctuary Reports “Unexpected Density” of Tigers

It’s not often we have good news to report for the world’s remaining wild tigers. This week Panthera, a global big cat conservation organization, said a preliminary survey it helped organize had discovered an unexpected density of wild tigers in the southern section of Tambling Wildlife Nature Conservation (TWNC), a privately managed concession on Indonesia’s Sumatra island.

Searching for Seahorses

Dr. Tse-Lynn Loh, Postdoctoral Research Associate John G. Shedd Aquarium, Chicago in partnership with Project Seahorse (University of British Columbia & Zoological Society of London) The wind blew steadily, whipping up whitecaps in the distance as our little long-tail boat made its way out of Panwa Bay, at the southeastern corner of Phuket, Thailand. My…

Guests Across The Globe: Six Months of 2013 NG Weekend Interviews

We’re halfway through the year and what better way to map our progress than to, well, map the many guests we’ve had on National Geographic Weekend since the ball dropped back in January?

Geography in the News: Eurasia’s Boundaries

By Neal Lineback and Mandy Lineback Gritzner, Geography in the NewsTM THE GEOGRAPHICAL DIVISIONS OF EUROPE AND ASIA Europe and Asia, while often considered two separate continents, both lie on the same landmass or tectonic plate, the Eurasian supercontinent. The historic and geographic story of the Eurasian boundary is intriguing.   Most students of history,…

Escape From Vietnam

On April 30, 1975, the Vietnam War officially ended with the fall of Saigon to Communist forces. Many Vietnamese fled their country, including one Special Forces officer who painstakingly planned his escape and paid $200 on the black market for a copy of a March 1971 National Geographic map to guide him.

10th World Wilderness Congress To Convene in Salamanca Spain Oct. 4

  Why would members of remote tribal communities, heads of state, Nobel Laureates, local activists, scientists, artists, and people like you plan to travel to Salamanca Spain? The l0th World Wilderness Congress will convene there on October 4 involving a great diversity of people, professions and activists who understand the importance of wild nature to…