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July 20, 2014 Radio Show: Making Music With Elephants, Running Hundreds of Miles Through Mountains and More

This week, on National Geographic Weekend radio show we run ultramarathons through Nepal, Switzerland and Utah’s Rocky Mountains, then we save goliath, learn safety tips about the newest bacterial threat, making music with elephants, visit the world’s largest caverns, and find some secret cities.

March 9, 2014: Racing the Iditarod With Twins, Time Traveling to a Black Hole and More

Join radio host Boyd Matson every week for adventure, conservation and green science. This week they ride 1,000 miles across Alaskan wilderness with a pack of dogs, hike quickly down the Appalachian Trail, lower scientists into sinkholes on tepuis, program robots to do household chores but not enslave the human race, break free of time on the edge of a black hole, be persecuted for our science, grow organic underwear, and explain evolution to children.

January 26, 2014: Riding Rio Roosevelt’s Rapids, Sliding Headfirst at 90 MPH and More

Join radio host Boyd Matson and his guests as they paddle Class V rapids on the River of Doubt, hand cycle the length of the Americas, investigate deaths from common drugs, preserve lions’ disappearing prides, slide headfirst down an icy track at 90 miles per hour, and reconcile the future and the past in the Amazon Rainforest.

January 19, 2014: Waging War Against Whalers, Paragliding Above Pakistan and More

Join host Boyd Matson as he and his guests sleep high on sheer mountain cliffs, wage war against whalers, consume bacteria in pursuit of better health, crash during paragliding takeoff in Pakistan, eat invasive species, and photograph 30 years of warfare in Afghanistan.

December 15, 2013: Paddling Through The World’s Biggest Rapids, Swimming in the World’s Coldest Oceans and More

This week, on National Geographic Weekend, host Boyd Matson joins guests as they paddle the world’s biggest rapids, dive in the world’s coldest oceans (at both poles), and walk “Out of Eden,” chasing our early human ancestors to the ends of the Earth.

Bacteria Power Social Lives of Hyenas

It turns out the social lives of hyenas are powered by bacteria that live in their scent glands, according to a new study.

A Stinky Concern: Your Stress Sweat Makes You Seem Incompetent

By Alaina G. Levine While many were fawning over the Nobel Prizes in the last few weeks, I became excited over a seemingly innocent paper published by PLOS One that, in fact, stinks big time. In the first comprehensive scientific study of stress sweat, Dr. Pamela Dalton, an experimental psychologist at the Monell Chemical Senses…

October 6, 2013: Throwing Axes Like a Lumberjack, Wolves Feeding Grizzlies, and More

This week on National Geographic Weekend, we row through a quickly thawing Northwest Passage, then we throw axes with a champion lumberjack, and finally, we snap pictures with National Geographic’s head of photography.

5 Extreme Life-Forms That Live on the Edge

Water bears, ice worms, and brine shrimp are among Earth’s “extremophiles”—creatures that can withstand the harshest conditions on the planet.

July 14, 2013: Leaving Your Spouse In the Death Zone, Brokering a Human-Tiger Peace, and More

This week, we summit all of 14 of the world’s 8,000 metre peaks with the first woman to do so, then we try to reduce human-animal conflict across India, and finally, we meet some of the world’s ugliest critters.

Scientists Discover How Bacteria Changes Ions Into Gold

Bacteria with the ability to change ions into solid gold? This scenario may sound like a biochemist’s version of a fairy tale, but it’s real and scientists at McMaster University have just figured out how the process works.

Bacteria Surviving at High Altitudes Could Play a Role in Global Climate

A new study published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences indicates that even as high as 30,000 feet in the sky, fungi and bacteria are present in the air. These living microorganisms could very well affect global climate. “The million-dollar question in the field [right now] is how much living things can impact clouds, the hydrological cycle and…

Where’s the Beef?

The recent media hullabaloo around “pink slime,” begins with a premise that would be applauded in other situations.  A private enterprise, Beef Products Inc (BPI), strives to use every last bit of a resource it has at its disposal—in this case, it’s the beef in the slaughterhouse. But what has come to light about BPI and…

Do We Really Need to use Human Medicine on Farm Animals?

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) took action on Wednesday, January 4 to ban certain uses of one class of drugs, cephalosporins, in raising cattle, pigs, chickens, and turkeys. Cephalosporin drugs are used to treat pneumonia, urinary tract infections, gastro-intestinal diseases, and other life-threatening infections in people; the FDA’s action will help preserve the…

Social Network Connects Members on a Gut Level

MyMicrobes, a new social network started by scientists in the EU, hopes to match up members who share similar types of bacteria.