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WATCH: Billions of Bugs Feast on Flesh and Dung in Borneo

Just in time for Halloween, follow cave ecologist and National Geographic grantee Donald McFarlane through Borneo’s “Cockroach Cave,” where every surface vibrates with cockroaches and other guano-grubbing and flesh-feasting creepy-crawlies.

BatCaver: Working to Protect North American Bats from White Nose Syndrome

By Cori Lausen

Bat Week culminates on Halloween this year. It’s a fitting opportunity to recognize how important these nocturnal flying animals are to our planet. The cave-dwelling mammals have been increasingly at risk from White Nose Syndrome, or WNS, a lethal malady has been spreading westward since its first occurrence in 2006.

Bat-Survey Lesson No. 42: Don’t Step on Any Lions

Northwestern Namibia’s desert may appear barren, but it is full of life as the dry season and Young Explorers Grantee Theresa Laverty’s pilot field season conclude.

From Running Water to No Water: In Search of Desert Bats

The search for water in the Namib Desert continues as we net for bats over a stretch of the running Hoarusib River and then pursue active springs on our way back through the Hoanib River.

Elephants on the Ground, Bats in the Sky, and Rivers Running Underground

Finding “safe” netting sites is not always easy as we discovered while on the Huab River during our quest to learn more about the desert bats of Namibia.

Bat Man of Borneo

Trudging through piles of guano up to 70 feet high, Donald McFarlane is getting to know the secrets of bats deep in the caves they call home.

A Bat-tastic Beginning for 2015!

After catching bats all night, I crawled into my tent at 11:59 PM and counted down to the New Year, listening to lions call in the distance and a hyena whooping nearby …

Bats Big and Small in the World’s Oldest Desert

Vying with desert elephants for a spot at waterholes at night, NG Young Explorer Grantee Theresa Laverty begins her search for insect-eating bats along northwestern Namibia’s dry riverbeds.

From Mega to Mini: Tracing Surprising Animal Connections

Two and a half years after my last stint living in Africa, I’m putting the large mammals aside to search for animals that are much smaller, but instill much fear in people around the world—bats.

Bats Set Their Internal Compass at Dusk—A First Among Mammals

Bats may be known for their stealth in the dark, but a new study shows they need light from the setting sun to navigate.

Science on the Edge of the World: Tales From Madagascar’s Sakalava Menabe

Cara Brook is a disease ecologist from the Andrew Dobson Lab at Princeton, studying diseases that can leap from bats to humans. Her work is well underway, and it involves a lot more than just tagging and indexing bats.

Geography in the News: Bats Dying

By Neal Lineback and Mandy Lineback Gritzner, Geography in the NewsTM Bats Dying: An Epidemic A deadly disease is destroying native bat populations in North America. Unfortunately, the “white-nose syndrome,” as the disease is named, is spreading more quickly than scientists had anticipated. The white-nose syndrome is just the latest threat to the world’s bat…

Beyond Bees: 4 Surprising Facts About Pollination

In honor of National Pollinator Week, we delve into the strange, colorful world of the creatures that keep our planet blooming.

BioBlitz Bobcast: ‪Night Time Bat Walk‬

When the sun goes down, the Presidio area of Golden Gate National Parks comes alive with owls, snakes, rodents, moths and, of course, bats. In this video by Bob Hirshon, a Bioblitz 2014 team of bat hunters, armed with ultrasound-detecting devices, hikes through the Lobos Creek and Dunes area of the park, looking and listening for bats.

March 24, 2014: Big Wave Crashes, Haitian Folk-Tunes, Babysitting Gorillas and More

Join radio host Boyd Matson every week for adventure, conservation and green science. This week they are held underwater until they blackout and are rescued, put Langston Hughes’ poetry to music, study bats in the living room, grow up with gorillas, survive a deadly Antarctic expedition, remind travelers to represent their nations, refuse to order bluefin tuna sushi, and create stronger laws to protect elephants.