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Tag archives for biodiversity

WATCH: Billions of Bugs Feast on Flesh and Dung in Borneo

Just in time for Halloween, follow cave ecologist and National Geographic grantee Donald McFarlane through Borneo’s “Cockroach Cave,” where every surface vibrates with cockroaches and other guano-grubbing and flesh-feasting creepy-crawlies.

Cannot See the Forest for the Bees

In Yosemite National Park, the bee population is incredibly diverse. However, these important pollinators are struggling in ecosystems across the nation. So what is the secret to the Yosemite bees’ success? It seems the answer is fire.

A New Strategy for Wildlife Conservation

By Cristián Samper

At the Wildlife Conservation Society today we unveiled our WCS: 2020 strategy and, along with it, a new WCS.org website and brand identity. This announcement advances our 120-year mission to save wildlife and wild places. As the world rapidly changes, our approach to conservation must adapt and evolve. Our WCS: 2020 strategy represents our response to that change and a way to scale up our impact. Our choices today can give us a fighting chance to preserve the intricate balance of species and ecosystems that all lives depend upon.

The Forgotten Elephants of the Leuser Ecosystem

The future of the critically endangered Sumatran elephant hangs on a thread. Palm oil plantations have converted 90 percent of prime Sumatran elephant habitat to a monoculture desert. The lowland rainforests of the Leuser Ecosystem are the world’s best remaining habitat for the Sumatran elephant yet they are being bulldozed, often illegally, for palm oil everyday.

At 2nd Expedition Site, Number of Species New to Bolivia’s Madidi Park Expands to 60

By Rob Wallace

We are in the midst of an altitudinal transect of Bolivia’s Madidi National Park: visiting 14 habitats over two years. The dry montane forests of the upper Tuichi river valley provided the setting for our second Identidad Madidi study site in July, allowing us to experience glorious changes in color. Most of the trees in these forests lose their leaves in June and July and an abundance of drier forest plant taxa abounds. One of the aims of Identidad Madidi is to significantly increase knowledge on vertebrate diversity and distribution in this globally outstanding protected area.

New Parks in Alberta’s Castle Wilderness Boost International Conservation Efforts

Conservationists rejoiced as Shannon Phillips, Alberta’s Minister of Environment and Parks, announced the province’s new government would create two parks totaling 104,000 hectares (a quarter of a million acres) in the mountainous Castle area last Friday. It marked the turning point in a forty year effort to protect this spectacular and biologically diverse area that…

Pledge to Restore Wild Buffalo Unites First Nations of North America

Can the return of a wild animal to its native range help people? Many North American Plains Indians are sure that bringing back wild bison can do just that. This month in Banff National Park three bands of the Stoney Nakoda First Nation and the Samson Cree Nation joined several other tribes to sign the…

Black Rhino return to Samburu-Land

In the shadow of Mount Kenya lie the hot lowlands of Samburu-land. This vast, beautiful region of rocky ridges, acacia grasslands and doum palm forest is the traditional homeland of the Samburu people, the rare Grevy’s zebra and the Gerenuk antelope. For thousands of years, it was also home to the black rhino, until the…

Offsetting Biodiversity: Greening or Greenwashing?

There’s a new conservation controversy brewing. While carbon offsetting continues to be debated as a response to continuing emissions growth, biodiversity offsetting is increasingly being seized upon as a solution to unabated biodiversity loss. The idea is that damage to biodiversity from development can be neutralized by creating an “ecologically-equivalent” benefit elsewhere – thus achieving “no net loss” of biodiversity. But inappropriate application of offsetting carries its own risk. What if misplaced confidence in offsets means more biodiversity losses are permitted? With many governments actively developing offset policies, strict standards are needed to ensure the approach really does mean better conservation outcomes, rather than simply drawing a thin green veil over habitat destruction.

If you can’t beat ’em, eat ’em

There’s a growing trend among scuba divers in the Caribbean: they’re on the hunt for something tasty… Last month, the Glass Goby (Coryphopterus hyalinus) suffered a change in status on The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Previously considered of Least Concern to conservationists, this reef-dwelling fish is now listed as Vulnerable. And it isn’t alone.…

World Heritage — Saving Nature As Well As Culture

By Susan Lieberman

What do the Taj Mahal, Yellowstone National Park, the Great Wall of China, and Virunga National Park have in common? They are all UNESCO World Heritage Sites, protected by an international convention recognizing that they and another thousand special places around the world are the common heritage of humanity and deserve the highest level of protection.

Think Fast: What Bird Is This?

Artist and science illustrator Jane Kim is painting all 241 modern bird families on a giant mural at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology. Learn how she captures details that make each species unique.

Why Uganda´s Bushfires Aren’t All Bad

During our field surveys to better understand the primate diversity of north-eastern Uganda, we seek the least travelled routes and those areas for which primates have never been surveyed. During our explorations in February 2015 we encountered many devastating bushfires.

The Proliferation of Hope

Environmental destruction seems to be all around us all the time: Poaching, habitat destruction, growing markets for ivory and bushmeat, political strife and increasing human population are reducing wildlife populations for many key species. In the early 90s, it seemed that the rhino had made a successful comeback from the brink of extinction, elephants numbered…

Top 25 Photographs from the Wilderness #23

“Life in us is like the water in a river.” Henry David Thoreau The Okavango is the beating heart of Africa, home to an estimated 50% of the world’s elephants, most of the world’s hippo, and crucial populations of many other keystone species. There is no wilder place on earth: this is the Africa of…