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Tag archives for Bolivia

New Threats Emphasize Need for Proactive Amazon Jaguar Conservation Planning

Now facing hunting pressure to meet a growing demand for trade in its parts, the jaguar occupies a special place in the history, culture, and traditions of Latin America. Revered for centuries by indigenous peoples for its strength and agility, the jaguar may well depend for its continued existence upon the care and cooperation of those who continue to live with this extraordinary animal.

1,000 Birds and 1,000 Butterflies: the Madidi Expedition Continues

By Rob Wallace

After a five month break during the wet season, the Identidad Madidi field team is reunited on the fifth leg of its Bolivian scientific expedition. The Andean foothill forests of the upper Hondo River represent our seventh study site in a series of fifteen spanning the unique altitudinal range of almost 6,000 meters in Madidi National Park.

Monitoring Jaguars and Other Charismatic Species in Bolivia’s Alto Madidi

Alto Madidi, on the upper Madidi River where the Andean foothills flatten out onto to the Amazonian floodplain, is a magical place and the sixth site on our two-year altitudinal transect in Madidi National Park. Extraordinary biological diversity, remote wilderness, and abundant wildlife – much of which seems almost naïve to the presence of people – are an intoxicating combination for the team Identidad Madidi.

Identidad Madidi Explores the Breathtaking Mountains of Bolivia’s Apolobamba Range

By Rob Wallace

Three in One! The dramatic and breathtaking mountains of the Apolobamba range provided the backdrop for our third, fourth, and fifth Identidad Madidi expedition study sites. Expected to take two years to complete, Identidad Madidi is a scientific expedition intended to draw attention to the wonders of Bolivia’s Madidi National Park. Our team of conservationists is investigating fourteen different habitats spanning 6,000 meters – from the Andes down to the Amazon – in what is the most biodiverse protected area on the planet. The most recent leg of the trip was planned to document the biodiversity at three of the four highest sites on our transect.

At 2nd Expedition Site, Number of Species New to Bolivia’s Madidi Park Expands to 60

By Rob Wallace

We are in the midst of an altitudinal transect of Bolivia’s Madidi National Park: visiting 14 habitats over two years. The dry montane forests of the upper Tuichi river valley provided the setting for our second Identidad Madidi study site in July, allowing us to experience glorious changes in color. Most of the trees in these forests lose their leaves in June and July and an abundance of drier forest plant taxa abounds. One of the aims of Identidad Madidi is to significantly increase knowledge on vertebrate diversity and distribution in this globally outstanding protected area.

Protecting Indigenous Peoples’ Rights, Conserving Biodiversity

By Lilian Painter

On August 9 the world will commemorate the International Day of the World’s Indigenous Peoples. This year the focus is on health and wellbeing. That topic engages me particularly as a conservationist working in the Amazon. The Bolivia program of WCS (Wildlife Conservation Society) has shown that the interests of indigenous peoples and conservation are not only compatible but also dependent on each other.

Identidad Madidi: Exploring the Fantastic Biodiversity of Bolivia

By Rob Wallace

It’s an idea that was four years in the making: to send a group of Bolivian scientists to investigate fourteen different habitats spanning 6,000 meters – from the Andes down to the Amazon – in what is the most biodiverse protected area on the planet. Identidad Madidi, expected to take a year and a half to complete, is a scientific expedition intended to draw attention to the wonders of Boliva’s Madidi National Park.

New Golden Bat Adds to Animals With the Midas Touch

A golden bat recently discovered in Bolivia has joined the ranks of nature’s richly gilded creatures.

April 6, 2014: Riding Horses Across Continents, Swimming in the Arctic Ocean and More

Every week, embark with host Boyd Matson on an exploration of the latest discoveries and interviews with some of the most fascinating people on the planet, on National Geographic Weekend. Please check listings near you to find the best way to listen to National Geographic Weekend on radio, or listen below! Hour 1 – Filipe Masetti left Calgary, Alberta on horseback nearly two…

DNA Research Reveals Uros People of Peru and Bolivia to Have Distinctive Genetic Ancestries

New genetic research led by the Genographic Project team shows a distinctive ancestry for the Uros populations of Peru and Bolivia that predates the arrival of the Spanish conquistadores and may date back to the earliest settlement of the Altiplano of the central Andes some 3,700 years ago.

July 28, 2013: Riding Horseback From Canada To Brazil, Walking Silently For 17 Years, and More

This week, we ride from Calgary to Brazil, relying on the kindness of strangers, then we forego motorized vehicles for 22 years while maintaining a vow of silence, and finally, we get some hiking tips from the best hiker in the world.

Developing an International Conservation Project Around Gran Chaco

Earlier this year Rolex announced the five winners of the 2012 Rolex Awards for Enterprise, who are being honored in New Delhi, India, on November 27. This profile looks at the work of 2012 Laureate Erika Cuéllar, a conservationist who is training local people in three countries to protect South America’s Gran Chaco. “Cuéllar has already proved herself as an inspirational and innovative negotiator who has gained the respect of indigenous people and political leaders alike. Her Rolex Award for Enterprise recognizes these attributes and will support this extension of Cuéllar’s participatory approach to preserving one of South America’s last truly wild places,” Rolex says.

October 28, 2012: Love in the Northwest Passage, Giant Predators in Prehistoric Australia, and More

This week on National Geographic Weekend, join host Boyd Matson as we sail a wooden yacht through the frozen Northwest Passage, dine with vultures in Turkey, discover life in an undersea desert in Gabon, remember the 18 fallen tigers in last year’s Zanesville, Ohio tragedy, dodge tree crocodiles and carnivorous kangaroos in prehistoric Australia, feed some birds and try not to get killed, paddle down Alaska’s Tanana River, and save macaws by making traditional headdresses (with synthetic feathers).

The Cellphone that Keeps the Water, and Data, Flowing

NGOs don’t always have the best reputation in the developing world. Sometimes they come into a community, install complex systems to fix a problem, and then leave – abandoning technology that can break down, become unsustainable or simply not help the people it’s supposed to. Water for People is different. They’re an NGO committed to…

Bolivian Indigenous Groups Protest Highway Construction

Indigenous groups in Bolivia have begun a march to protest the construction of a highway that will bisect a biodiverse rain forest region. For more background on the issues facing indigenous South Americans, revisit these articles from the National Geographic archives.