National Geographic

VOICES Voices Icon Ideas and Insight From Explorers

Menu

Tag archives for Brazil

Island’s Invasive Species Wreak Havoc: How Did They Get Here?

Invasive cats, rats, and lizards are wreaking havoc on the native species of Fernando de Noronha. How did they all get here?

A Day in the Life of a Researcher in Search of Rats

The last twenty-four hours on Fernando de Noronha have been non-stop, non-sleep, and action filled, and not just because it’s been Carnival in Brazil.

Mapping Rio de Janeiro’s Christ the Redeemer in High-Definition

This post is the latest in the Drones and Small Unmanned Aerial Systems Special Series, which profiles interesting information, thoughts and research into using  drones, UAVs or remotely piloted vehicles for journalism and photography, that Kike learns about during his travels. 3D UAV mapping technology is delving into uncharted territory, finding applications for the union of UAV hardware and image processing software…

500 Years on a Tropic Island in 500 Words or Less

When studying invasive species on a remote island, it helps to know the island’s history. And this one’s good.

First Impressions of Fernando de Noronha

As we watch the sunset from a rocky promenade, a rodent known in Brazil as mocó, darts around, and I realize the islands must have many surprises in store for me.

Expedition Begins Amid Drought in São Paulo

After 16 hours of flying, I’m keen for a shower. Unfortunately for me, but much more so for the rest of São Paulo, the city is falling in to the grip of its worst drought since 1930.

Expedition: Fernando de Noronha, Brazil

This week I am packing my bags in anticipation of my trip to Brazil. Over the next month I will be working in the remote oceanic archipelago of Fernando de Noronha, supported by the Ciência sem Fronteiras programme of CAPES. I will be updating my Voices Blog regularly every few days with updates of the…

Seen and not heard: Six months after the World Cup, little has changed for Rio’s Favela footballers

In many ways Breno Washington is a typical 15-year-old boy. He has the look of someone whose body grew slightly too quick for him, but he wears it easy anyway, like a pair of good jeans; he likes the Chicago Bulls and sometimes he smokes marijuana with his friends. Unlike most boys his age, however,…

December 7, 2014: Return “Kidnapped” Animals to the Wild, Save the World’s Big Cats and More

This week on National Geographic Weekend, join host Boyd Matson and his guests as they climb El Capitan with young children, stop the kidnapping of Brazil’s wildlife, save lions by saving livestock, lift a 35-ton stone with prehistoric technology, work to save the last 3,000 wild tigers, visit some of the last nomadic tribes, bottle feed a baby cheetah, and clean up hazardous waste.

November 23, 2014: Set Speed Records on El Capitan, Prosecute Poaching Kingpins and More

This week on National Geographic Weekend, join host Boyd Matson and his guests as they ride horses from Calgary to Brazil, pick the perfect bottle of wine for Thanksgiving dinner, find the best places to travel right now, come back from the dead, provide solar power for the future, protect mountain gorillas and Africa’s oldest national park, eat beef, cycle through all seasons, and teach Africa’s young women to be the continent’s future leaders.

Expedition Diaries: Salvador de Bahia

This post is the latest in the series  Kike Calvo’s visual diary as a National Geographic Expert on the Buenos Aires, Rio and Brazil´s Wild Coast National Geographic Explorer.  A perfect cacophony of drums and Afro-Brazilian percussion instruments seem to infuse every corner as we go up narrow streets to find our hotel in the pastel-hued…

Mining Research in the Amazon – Methodological Perspectives from the Field

In this guest post, I have requested one of our doctoral candidates Mirella Gavidia to share her insights from communicating her dissertation research in the Amazon with communities whom she studied and who were not so used to contemporary social research methods. The iterative process by which field research must adapt to field conditions shines…

Should Species Be Paid Royalties?

Perhaps one of the most interesting ways that people use species is to support our own actions, beliefs, and loyalties. Some of the most recognizable mascots and brands in the world are based on the qualities associated with a species or, more often than not, the actual species itself. Our cultures are filled with businesses,…

Q&A: Inside the Fight Against Wildlife Trafficking in Brazil

Conservation biologist Juliana Machado Ferriera talks about her work to halt illegal wildlife trade in Brazil, which affects nearly 40 million animals each year.

June 29, 2014: Refueling Satellites in Space, Sequencing the Koala Genome and More

Every week, embark with host Boyd Matson on an exploration of the latest discoveries and interviews with some of the most fascinating people on the planet, on National Geographic Weekend. This week, we walk in space to refuel a satellite, cure koalas of chlamydia, play soccer the Brazilian way, end elephant poaching in Tanzania, run out of air at the bottom of the Arctic Ocean, pair scientists with adventurers, road trip through the American South, and “revisit the Golden Age of Exploration.”