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Tag archives for camera traps

Google+ Hangout: Get to Know India’s Curious Big Cats

As part of Big Cat Week on Nat Geo Wild, several National Geographic big cat researchers, photographers, and conservationists (including me) are joining together for a live video chat via Google+ Hangout Wednesday, December 3rd at 1 p.m. EST (6 p.m. UTC). This is your chance to get your questions about these beautiful, fascinating, and highly endangered animals answered by those of us…

Grey Wolf Captured On Camera

Rare Video: Vandal Fishing Cats Lead to Wildlife Discovery

Endangered Baby Fishing Cat Fishes in the Wild from Morgan Heim on Vimeo. When I set out to cover the story of Thailand’s fishing cats, I never expected vandalism could lead to an unprecedented wildlife discovery for this little known endangered species. Fishing cats are increasingly rare. New estimates suggest only about 2,500-3,000 remain in…

Rare Cat Captured in Camera Trap

The elusive Borneo bay cat and four other rare species of felines have been spotted in logged forests—a good sign, experts say.

Video: Brown Bears Fighting, Playing, & Scratching in Transylvanian Woods

Victoria Hillman is a National Geographic Explorer and Research Director for the Transylvanian Wildlife Project overseeing research on carnivores and biodiversity of Europe’s last great wilderness. Follow the expedition here on Explorers Journal through updates from the team. —–— As you may have gathered from the title, after all our posts about pink grasshoppers and other unusual sightings…

Counting the Tigers That You Cannot See

Pollsters say tigers are the most popular animal species on this planet. Unfortunately, they are also among the most threatened. Wildlife biologists like me struggle to monitor the fate of surviving tiger populations.

18 Amazing, Intimate Camera Trap GIFs of Serengeti Animals

Biologist Craig Packer has headed the Serengeti Lion Project since 1978. The director of the Lion Research Center and Distinguished McKnight University Professor at the University of Minnesota has spent countless hours on the Serengeti plains, studying lion ecology, genetics, health, and other factors. (Hear some of Packer’s expert commentary in the interactive Serengeti Lion experience and read more in “The Short Happy…

Sumatra Sanctuary Reports “Unexpected Density” of Tigers

It’s not often we have good news to report for the world’s remaining wild tigers. This week Panthera, a global big cat conservation organization, said a preliminary survey it helped organize had discovered an unexpected density of wild tigers in the southern section of Tambling Wildlife Nature Conservation (TWNC), a privately managed concession on Indonesia’s Sumatra island.

Photographer’s Journal: Up Close and Personal with British Otters

British photographer Charlie Hamilton James’s charming close-ups of otters grace the February 2013 issue of National Geographic Magazine. Here, he tells us how he captured such clear images of the shy creatures and their watery world, and explores the question: Can otters smell underwater?

Watching Wild Snow Leopards

By Darla Hillard Education Director, Snow Leopard Conservancy Photo © John Merjanian:  Wild snow leopard observed in Ladakh, northern India by members of the Wintertime Quest for the Snow Leopard Stuart writes:  After Darla posted an earlier story, I begged her to do another to include a video clip of a young snow leopard playing with…

Turkey’s First Wildlife Corridor Links Bear, Wolf and Lynx Populations to the Caucasus Forests

Dr. Çağan Şekercioğlu is a National Geographic Emerging Explorer. A professor of conservation biology, ecology and ornithology at the University of Utah Department of Biology, he also directs the Turkish environmental organization KuzeyDoğa. A gray wolf (Canis lupus) photographed by one of KuzeyDoğa‘s camera traps in Kars Turkey (Türkiye) is the only country covered almost entirely by three…

Camera Trap Pictures Show Puma Evading Humans

Photos taken on 18 January 2011 by a remote camera traps we have set up as part of an ongoing conservation science project to study the Andean bear illustrate that our sense of hearing, along with our sense of smell, is relatively weak compared to those of the large mammals living in the Peruvian forest, and that they react to us even when we don’t know they are there.