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Tag archives for carnivores

Puma Observed Hunting Howler Monkeys in Costa Rica

A short stroll before dinner last Thursday yielded a once-in-a-lifetime wildlife sighting—along with the photos necessary to prove that it really happened. The setting was Santa Rosa National Park, a stretch of tropical dry forest within Costa Rica’s spectacular Area de Conservación Guanacaste. I set out from the Park’s main administrative area shortly before 4:00 p.m.…

Top Photos: 20 Years Camera-trapping India’s Elusive Carnivores

The Wildlife Conservation Society-India Program has been camera-trapping critters big and small for more than 20 years. Here are some of their best images.

Video: Brown Bears Fighting, Playing, & Scratching in Transylvanian Woods

Victoria Hillman is a National Geographic Explorer and Research Director for the Transylvanian Wildlife Project overseeing research on carnivores and biodiversity of Europe’s last great wilderness. Follow the expedition here on Explorers Journal through updates from the team. —–— As you may have gathered from the title, after all our posts about pink grasshoppers and other unusual sightings…

Camera Trap Pictures: Rare Badgers, Mongooses Spotted in Gabon

Honey badgers, mongooses, civets, and other small carnivores roam Gabon’s forests, according to the first such survey of its kind.

Why Is This Australian Spotted Cat in Trouble?

Bad news for the Tasmanian devil also may mean tough times for another one of Tasmania’s predators, the eastern quoll, scientists say.

Tracking Wild Dogs in Botswana’s Okavango Delta

Tracking rarely seen wild dogs on the run across the waterways and islands of Botswana’s Okavango Delta was almost impossible. These painted canines are swift hunters and despite our high-powered safari vehicle we had trouble keeping up with them. African wild dogs hunt with formidable speed in tightly coordinated packs that seem to think and…

The Carnivores Next Door

First it was the raccoons. Next came the coyotes. And then? Bigger carnivores. Urban and suburban areas in North America are home to a lot of small, wild predators, and now scientists believe that the coyote’s success in adapting to an urban lifestyle could pave the way for larger carnivores to move in. Ohio State…