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Celebrating a Decade of Conservation in Chile’s Karukinka Landscape

By Bárbara Saavedra and Cristián Samper

On the southern tip of Tierra del Fuego in the Patagonia region of Chile, you’ll find one of the most stunning wild places in the hemisphere, complete with bountiful peat bogs, sub-Antarctic woodlands, windswept steppes, and snow-covered mountain ranges. Spanning 1,160 square miles, the Karukinka landscape is home to Patagonia’s unique wildlife, including the endangered culpeo fox, the Andean condor, guanacos (wild relatives of the llama), and the Magellanic woodpecker, the largest woodpecker in the Americas. It’s also a place rich in plant species like southern beech, Chilean fire bush, white dog orchid, and sundew.

Chilean Near-Shore Fisheries: From Shutdown to Successful Management

By: Carmen Revenga, Sustainable Fisheries Director, The Nature Conservancy and Cristina Rumbaitis del Rio, Senior Associate Director, The Rockefeller Foundation Today, Chile is a global example for good near-shore fisheries management. The emblematic Chilean abalone, and other important seafood, like mussels, limpets, and sea urchins live in the rocky and sandy bottoms along the Chilean…

Giant Blast Marks Milestone for Future Monster Telescope

A giant telescope kicks off construction with a mountaintop blast today.

A Bottom-Line Focus For Solving Mining Conflicts

The lure of precious metals and other natural resources has long been a source of conflict in Latin America, from the Andes to the Amazon and most everywhere else.  But new research has begun to put a price tag on this conflict, and investors have started to respond. When the lives and livelihoods of Indigenous…

May 18, 2014: Kayaking from Australia to New Zealand, Exploring America by Night, and More

This week on National Geographic Weekend, join host Boyd Matson and his guests as they bicker at the South Pole, find the perfect pairing between beer and food, ride off into the Chilean sunset, solve the global malaria crisis, celebrate the desegregation of American public schools, tip our waiter, hunt for Sasquatch, and jog to save our memory.

Interactive Map: Untamed Patagonia

In the heart of Patagonia, the legendary land of wildness, fierce winds, and hardy gauchos, a new national park is underway. Based in a tent at the bottom of the earth, cartographers Marty Schnure and Ross Donihue set out to create maps that bring the place and its mission to life.

April 27, 2014: Tragedy on Everest, Rowing Across the Pacific, Wrestling Mongolians and More

Join radio host Boyd Matson every week for adventure, conservation and green science. This week his guests reflect on the dangers of climbing Mount Everest after the recent tragedy, row a boat across the oceans and bike across continents to circumnavigate the globe, discover what it is like to be a kid in Mongolia, learn what happened This Weekend In History, detect land mines in Cambodia, travel in style with your dog companion, discover new ways which drug trafficking is cutting down the rainforest, gave through space and time with the world’s most powerful satellite array, and understand why Sherpas climb deadly peaks on Wild Chronicles.

Some Ancient Sloths Ventured Into the Ocean, Study Says

A new study finds that dense bones enabled aquatic sloths to sink to shallow seagrass beds in order to graze.

February 15, 2014: California’s Drought, Inside the Human Brain, a 1,000 Mile Desert Trek and More

Join radio host Boyd Matson every week for adventure, conservation and green science. This week they are trekking 1,000 miles through the Empty Quarter Desert, searching for the lost civilization of Shangri La, looking at the implications of California’s severe drought, walking through Chinatowns, researching the human brain, getting a visit from the Love Doctor, and learning what makes Russians smile.

Star-Studded Timelapse Video From Chile’s High-Desert

When stargazers dream of the ultimate destination for looking up at the heavens, the high-altitude Atacama Desert in northern Chile likely stands at the top of the list. Nature videographer Nicholas Buer recently shot this stunning film, taken over 12 days while he camped out in the San Pedro de Atacama region of northern Chile. Sitting at an altitude…

Chile and Pakistan: A Missed Opportunity for Mineral Relations at Reko Diq

Looking at a planetary map, one would find very little in common between South America’s most developed country, Chile, and South Asia’s beleaguered nuclear power, Pakistan. Apart from the physical distance, there is little commonality in linguistic, religious or ethno-cultural background. Yet minerals and economic expedience have brought these two countries closer to possible cooperation.…

Why Has the Darwin’s Frog Likely Gone Extinct?

Deep in the forests of Chile, a frog has gone silent, possibly forever—and an epidemic fungus may be the culprit.

Two Young Explorers Create First Map of the Future Patagonia National Park

For Young Explorers Marty Schnure and Ross Donihue, the past nine months have been a journey of energy, frustration, sweat, cold, wind, laughs, scree, sore feet, an icy tent, warm sleeping bags, a lot of lamb stew, hard work, failure, perseverance, and success.

September 22, 2013: Paddling the Americas, Blind Date Adventures, and More

This week on National Geographic Weekend, as we pursue adrenaline and white water throughout the Americas, blind date for 200 miles down Alaska’s Lost Coast, and learn to thrive despite past failures.

June 23, 2013: Brokering Peace for Elephants, Surfing Down the Baja Coast, and More

This weekend, we learn about how National Geographic Explorer-in-Residence Mike Fay made peace between rebel leaders and forest elephants in Central African Republic, we carry water on our back for a 1,000-mile trek down Mexico’s Baja California Coast, and we ride Europe’s rails in comfort.