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July 20, 2014 Radio Show: Making Music With Elephants, Running Hundreds of Miles Through Mountains and More

This week, on National Geographic Weekend radio show we run ultramarathons through Nepal, Switzerland and Utah’s Rocky Mountains, then we save goliath, learn safety tips about the newest bacterial threat, making music with elephants, visit the world’s largest caverns, and find some secret cities.

China and U.S. Sign Pacts on Climate Change

The world’s two largest carbon emitters have signed pacts to cut greenhouse gas emissions. The deals—actually eight projects demonstrating smart grids and carbon capture, utilization and storage—were made through the China-U.S. Climate Change Working Group and will involve companies and research bodies. “The significance of these two nations coming together can’t be understated,” said U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry at the…

Greening Efforts in North Korea: Peace Dividends Remain Elusive but Efforts must Endure

The latest geopolitical wrangle on the Korean peninsula hit me with particular disappointment as I ambled fruitlessly outside the sprawling North Korean embassy in the choicest diplomatic enclave in Beijing.  For two days I had waited to get my visa stamped for a visit to Pyongyang and a series of sites in the country where…

Researchers Discover “Bizarre” Jurassic Insect With Giant Sucker

Scientists have discovered a “bizarre” parasite from the Jurassic era that really sucked. An international team of researchers recently described this 165-million-year-old fossilized fly larvae that they found in Inner Mongolia, an autonomous region in northeastern China once studded with volcanoes and freshwater lakes. They named the species Qiyia jurassica (“Qiyia” is derived from the Chinese word for “strange”),…

June 15, 2014: Negotiating Elephant Truce With Armies, Running 50 Marathons in 50 Days and More

Every week, embark with host Boyd Matson on an exploration of the latest discoveries and interviews with some of the most fascinating people on the planet, on National Geographic Weekend. This week, we negotiate a truce between armies and Central African forest elephants, find common ground between jazz and physics, learn to take a cover photo for National Geographic magazine, run 50 marathons in 50 states in 50 straight days, learn the National Parks Service’s most secret places, and learn about panda bear’s reproductive difficulties.

Shenzhen Joins C40 & Marks 2014 China National Low-Carbon Day

Earlier this week, Shenzhen joined C40 as our first mainland Chinese city with Megacity member status China. The move brings the total number of C40 member cities to 68. By joining C40, Shenzhen, home to 10.6 million people and the second largest port in China, will have the opportunity to share the challenges and successes it has faced in…

EPA Releases Proposed Rule for Existing Power Plants

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) this week announced a proposed rule to reduce carbon dioxide emissions from existing fossil fuel–fired power plants 30 percent below 2005 levels by 2030. This first-of-its-kind proposal uses an infrequently exercised provision of the Clean Air Act to set state-specific reduction targets for carbon dioxide and to allow states to devise individual or…

A Young Chinese Conservationist Discusses His Country’s Role in the Ivory Trade

Gao Yufang, 26, is a Chinese researcher and conservationist who graduated last month with a masters from the Yale School of Forestry and Environmental Studies. At Yale, Gao focused his studies on the ivory trade, with emphasis on the varied, sometimes conflicting understanding about the Chinese role in it. This, he believes, creates obstacles to…

Geography in the News: Declining Panda Habitat

By Neal Lineback and Mandy Lineback Gritzner, Geography in the NewsTM Lost Panda Habitat Two days after the devastating earthquake hit China in mid-May, 2008, officials were able to confirm that all of China’s estimated 239 giant pandas in captivity were alive and well. Unfortunately, the fate of the 1,590 pandas living in the wild…

China Pledges $10 Million in Support of Wildlife Conservation in Africa

By Fredrick Nzwili Chinese Premier Li Keqiang, on a three-day visit to Kenya, announced May 10 that China will provide $10 million to support wildlife protection and conservation in Africa and help establish an African Ecological and Wildlife Centre in Nairobi.  During Li’s visit, Kenya and China signed a total of 17 agreements, which include…

International Relations in the Ancient and Modern Worlds

After a week of archaeological site visits and presentations, lessons arise from stories of the past to help shape the world of the future.

Animal Burials, Early Ruler, and Ivory Statue Unearthed in Egyptian Tomb Complex

Learn more about beautiful artifacts from a newly discovered very early Egyptian tomb.

May 4, 2014: Driving to the World’s Coldest Cities and Cracking the Humor Code

The winter of 2014 was long and cold in many parts of North America. But even the most frigid midwestern temperatures would be considered mild to Oymyakon, Russia’s 472 residents. One of the candidates for the “Coldest Town in the World,” Felicity Aston visited the Siberian hamlet in the middle of winter to learn how its residents deal with sustained temperatures of -76 degrees Fahrenheit. On her 18,000 mile “Pole of Cold” drive from London to Europe and Asia’s coldest places, Aston learned that the residents love winter, because it often provides them with their livelihood, it connects them with nearby towns by letting them drive over frozen lakes and rivers. She also gives tips on how to get a car to start when the mercury dips nearly 100 degrees below freezing.

Faces of the Past, Reflections of the Present at Archaeology Conference

We can find reflections of ourselves in ancient cultures if we know how to look. Explore top archaeologists’ latest ideas from the 2014 Dialogue of Civilizations, and share your thoughts as well.

2014 Dialogue of Civilizations Opens in Istanbul

What can the ancient world teach us about today’s world? Join the conversation with archaeologists and other experts gathered in Turkey this week.