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Tag archives for conservation

Images From North America’s Highest Peak

A team of alpinists captured beautiful imagery while climbing, skiing—and helping conserve—Alaska’s Mount Denali.

Smuggled iguanas tell larger tale of animal trafficking

The two Northern Bahamian Rock Iguanas (Cyclura cychlura) that arrived recently to Shedd Aquarium are familiar faces to me. I’ve dedicated more than 20 years of my life studying the three types (i.e. subspecies) of this species in The Bahamas. During this time, I have been fortunate to work with dedicated individuals and organizations, such…

Mesoamerican Race to Protect Parrotfish and the Reef

In a dramatic twist to the typical fishing tournament, this friendly competition among the four countries sharing the Mesoamerican reef (Belize, Guatemala, Honduras and Mexico) rewards international players who catch less fish and protect more coral reefs.

Conservation Triumphs on the Eighth Continent

“The true biologist deals with life,” says my favorite author, “with teeming boisterous life, and learns something from it, learns that the first rule of life is living.” After thirteen months in Madagascar, I will dare to call myself a biologist—one who has learned truly what it means to live.

Chasing Orangutans Into an Unknown Frontier

I’ll be entering into mysterious areas under the shadow of Mt. Gunung Palung, places where few have ventured into and where none have followed orangutans. I’ll be exploring the unknown.

Conservationists Clash on #CecilTheLion, Hunting, and the Future

Cecil the Lion’s illegal killing isn’t just trending in news, it was trending in the hallways of the International Congress of Conservation Biology (ICCB) last week. The biennial, five-day gathering of 2,000 scientists is structured by formal, planned presentations. But on the conference’s last day, an untraditional pop-up session called “#CecilTheLion: What Next?” revealed just how factionalized…

Tracking Desert Rhinos On Foot In Namibia

Desert rhino tracking on foot took us deep into the rocky mountains and gravel plains of Damaraland. We were inside the 450,000-hectare Palmwag Concession, where rhinos roam freely across the desert of Namibia. Desert-adapted black rhinos have large home ranges and aren’t easy to find, even for local trackers. Over the past 30 years, the…

From Mussels to Crayfish and Gobies: Have the Great Lakes Experienced an “Invasional Meltdown?”

Guest post by Eric Larson, postdoctoral research associate, Shedd Aquarium Not many people have likely heard of Beaver Island, a large, isolated island located far off shore at the northern end of Lake Michigan. Home to roughly 600 permanent residents and accessible only by ferry or small plane, Beaver Island is a well-kept secret of…

Protect the Ocean with National Geographic Pristine Seas & Davidoff Cool Water

This is sponsor content.    For the fourth consecutive year, Davidoff Cool Water joins forces with the National Geographic Society to support the Pristine Seas Expeditions. The initiative is committed to explore, scientifically document and protect the Ocean worldwide, with the global ambitious goal of fully protecting 10% of the ocean by 2020. 2014 &…

What a Group of 2,000 Biologists Talks About May Surprise You

“We’re not [just] talking about ‘how to save a rhino,’” says Dr. James Watson, President of the Society of Conservation Biology at the biannual gathering in France.

Fishy Parents Rejoice: Grades Rise, Few Fails on Caribbean’s Original Coral Reef Report Card

A report card from iLCP Partner Healthy Reefs for Healthy People, for the largest barrier reef in the Western Hemisphere – the Mesoamerican reef flanking the coasts of Mexico, Belize, Guatemala and Honduras – gives hope that it may earn this year’s award for “most improved,” or perhaps “happiest fish.”

Black Rhino return to Samburu-Land

In the shadow of Mount Kenya lie the hot lowlands of Samburu-land. This vast, beautiful region of rocky ridges, acacia grasslands and doum palm forest is the traditional homeland of the Samburu people, the rare Grevy’s zebra and the Gerenuk antelope. For thousands of years, it was also home to the black rhino, until the…

A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to Oshkosh

This year, LightHawk Volunteer Pilot Michael Baum of Los Altos, CA made an interesting stop on his way to EAA AirVenture in Oshkosh, WI. The self-described aviation enthusiast made a special detour to Centennial, Colorado (KAPA) to begin a flight mission donated for LightHawk. Baum touched down on his way to AirVenture, the renowned airshow…

Not all Dragons Breathe Fire

Dragons have been present in human folklore for centuries, appearing as heroes and villains in the pages of children’s books, Hollywood summer blockbusters, and popular television shows. But to me, dragons are just another part of my day job. As the senior wild animal keeper for the Herpetology Department at the Bronx Zoo in New York City, I am responsible for the care and management of the four Komodo dragons that are currently part of our collection. While these dragons do not breathe fire and have not stolen away princesses, they still possess the beauty, power, and majesty of their fictional brethren.

Video Trap Catches Genet Hitching a Ride on Back of Rhinoceros

A genet, a small nocturnal animal that resembles a mix between a cat and a mongoose, was caught in a video trap hitching a ride on the back of a critically endangered black rhino in a South African park. It can be seen hunting insects that might have either been disturbed by the rhino, or attracted to it (like a cattle egret or fork-tailed drong would do during the day). A bat, (another potential source of prey for the genet), is also seen cashing in on the insect bounty. It is still unclear whether the genet is also interested in parasites like ticks on the rhino’s skin.