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Tag archives for conservation

Grévys Zebra now protected in Kenya by Samburu Warriors

More closely related to an ass than a horse, the Grevy’s zebra (Equus grevyi) is the world’s largest living wild equid. The Grevy’s zebra has a stripe pattern as unique as a human fingerprint, and large round ears. Once used in Roman circuses, it was forgotten by the western world for a millennium, until it was named…

Pride of Africa: New Lion Conservation Alliance

It is a little known fact that there are more rhinos remaining in Africa than there are lions.  In fact, until the killing of the lion ‘Cecil’ by a U.S. hunter in Zimbabwe earlier this year, it was also not popularly known that African lion numbers are in free-fall. The statistics are disturbing. In 1975,…

Playing technology catchup: What conservation might learn from human development

In 2007 a student ecologist walked out across the African savannah, armed with a clipboard and a ballpoint pen. They were off to record evidence of the presence of different grazers in the landscape. In 2012 that same ecologist set off again to monitor the impact of grazers in different habitats. This time though it…

6 Lessons for Effective Science-based Ocean Conservation

Ocean conservation is hard. You fight the challenges of “out of sight, out of mind,” of largely unregulated high seas, and of waters so vast people find it hard to believe humans could actually overfish it (or as the saying goes in Jamaica, “fish can’t done”). The ocean is indeed in deep deep trouble due…

Seal Pups: Ferociously Cute and Worth Protecting

Fur seal pups may be the cutest creatures in Antarctica—but they can give some serious attitude, as National Geographic grantee and wildlife biologist Douglas Krause finds out when he tries to make sure these animals are as healthy as they are adorable.

Black Bears Show Us How to Save Wild Florida

I am a multi-generation Floridian and a photographer focused on wild Florida. I’m also a lifelong hunter who has killed my share of deer and hogs, so when I decided to document the first bear hunt in 21 years, I tried to keep an open mind. I met my first Florida black bear up-close nine…

4 Steps to Improve Ocean Conservation Research in Small Island States

To be effective, marine conservation must be based on rigorous and targeted science. The large and growing threats to ocean ecosystems — overfishing, climate change, pollution, and habitat destruction — coupled with the limited scientific capacity of most small island states make science-based management not only an imperative, but also a challenge. Here’s one part…

United for Salmon: Preserving the Pacific Northwest

The Lindblad Expeditions-National Geographic (LEX-NG) Fund aims to protect the last wild places in the ocean while facilitating conservation, research, education, and community development programs in the places we explore. This blog entry spotlights some of the exciting work our grantees are doing with support from the LEX-NG Fund. By Angela M. Thomas Here’s a…

The Real Tropical Island Experience on Aride

Aride Island is the wildlife highlight of a visit to the Inner Granitics of the Seychelles, with more bird species than any other island. Ten species of seabird are found on this tiny 68 hectare island.

The Giant 3D Printer That Can Stop Climate Change

By Jeremy Radachowsky

In the run-up to the United Nations Climate Change Conference in Paris next month, countries are promoting research into new climate-friendly technologies – things like capturing carbon emitted from smokestacks and storing it underground, increasing efficiency of energy use and the transportation sector, and even wilder ideas such as changing the reflectivity of earth’s surface. Yet, there are two existing technologies that are ready to be acted upon today, whose collective impact could be larger than any future technological breakthrough.

Faster Than Life? How Cheetahs Cope With Relocation

Post submitted by BCI Grantee Florian J Weise. The world is getting smaller as more and more people put pressure on wildlife habitats. This is particularly true for large predators that require vast areas. Africa’s fastest big cat, the charismatic cheetah, can outrun its prey and Usain Bolt without trouble, but it cannot outrun human…

Touring Wildlife by Bicycle on La Digue, Seychelles

La Digue is the laid-back island of the Seychelles. At just over 1,000 hectares and full of postcard beaches around every corner, its possible to travel around the entire island in one day – and the mode of choice is the bicycle.

This Deadly-Looking Leopard Is Actually Fun to Photograph

National Geographic photographer Steve Winter comes face-to-face with a family of leopards as part of his work to help protect these stunning creatures.

Where Do Pumas Den?

Submitted by Max Allen of the Santa Cruz Puma Project.

Northern Botswana Summer Field Trip

Post submitted by Andrew Stein Northern Botswana provides critical habitat for one of the largest remaining intact populations of wild lions in the world, yet regional conflicts between villagers and lions have threaten its viability. Recent poisoning events have indiscriminately targeted lions and killed spotted hyenas, jackals and vultures as well. The ‘Pride In Our…