National Geographic

VOICES Voices Icon Ideas and Insight From Explorers

Menu

Tag archives for conservation

Hair Bands and Giant Trousers: A Lesson in How Little I Know About Bees

This article is brought to you by the International League of Conservation Photographers (iLCP). Read our other articles on the National Geographic Voices blog featuring the work of our iLCP Fellow Photographers all around the world. Text and photos by Clay Bolt, Fellow at the International League of Conservation Photographers. www.claybolt.com / www.beautifulbees.org For months I have been…

Elusive Wolverine Caught on Camera

Nicknamed “the devil bear” for its fierce disposition, wolverines are tenacious predators. Photographing the animal was a mixture of luck and perseverance for photographer Peter Mather, who spent a month trying to capture an image of one in the Canadian Yukon.

Industrial-Scale Tiger Farms: Feeding China’s Thirst for Luxury Tiger Products

Young, healthy tigers jump through rings of fire, sit upright on cue, clawing at the air, and perform other well-choreographed circus tricks. Enthusiastic crowds cheer. After the show, some pay extra to hold small, cuddly cubs. But those who visit these tiger attractions in China have no idea of the suffering behind the scenes or the dark commerce that keeps them afloat.

October 19, 2014: Creating Electricity From Food Waste, Arresting Poachers and More

This week on National Geographic Weekend radio, join host Boyd Matson and his guests as they unearth the habits of the world’s largest-ever carnivore, digest kitchen waste to cook dinner, eat like a 500 year old king, stalk Chernobyl’s ruins, trace tree rings’ roots, write a novel about elephants with a plot twist, kayak to protest dams, prosecute poachers in Mozambique, and see the unseen as a large format film.

CITES and confiscated elephant ivory and rhino horn – to destroy or not destroy?

Over the past 24 months we have seen a number of countries, including Belgium, Chad, China, Hong Kong SAR, China, Czech Republic, Gabon, France, Philippines, and the USA, destroy stockpiles of illegally traded elephant ivory and rhino horn that have been seized and confiscated. I have been invited by national CITES authorities to witness several…

Why We “Celebrate” Threatened Species

Yesterday I met Lonesome George. He was the last of his kind and he is now displayed in taxidermy at the American Museum of Natural History in New York. He’s tucked away under a glass case in an alcove on the 4th floor amidst other extinct species, but, none of their extinctions are nearly as…

Report Estimates Enormous Economic Value of Living Elephants

When a young elephant dies at the hands of an ivory poacher, according to a recent report, the commercial loss to the tourism industry is more than $1.6 million–­–the amount the animal would have contributed to the economy had it lived a full and happy life.

Life in the Great Barrier Reef

This article is brought to you by the International League of Conservation Photographers (iLCP). Read our other articles on the National Geographic News Watch blog featuring the work of our iLCP Fellow Photographers all around the world. Text and photos by iLCP Fellow Jürgen Freund on expedition with iLCP partner, The Khaled bin Sultan Living Oceans Foundation. Onboard the M/Y Golden Shadow,…

Olazul Seeks a Healthy Solution to Depleted Fish Stocks

By Madeleine May For Santiago Cañedo Flores and other fishermen along the La Paz Bay in Baja California Sur, the solution to depleted fish stocks may lie in harvesting an unconventional product: seaweed. Don Santiago and other fishermen in Baja California Sur are partnering with Olazul, a San Francisco-based organization founded in 2009, to design community-owned…

Top 25 Photographs from the Wilderness #21

“The question is not what you look at, but what you see.” Henry David Thoreau A good friend once told me that wildlife photography makes him sad. He explained that when he sees images of the wild creatures and unspoiled places his heart aches too deeply at the thought of what he perceives to be…

WWF’s Living Planet Report echoed on the Great Barrier Reef

This article is brought to you by the International League of Conservation Photographers (iLCP). Read our other articles on the National Geographic News Watch blog featuring the work of our iLCP Fellow Photographers all around the world. Text and photos by iLCP Fellow James Morgan For decades, the Great Barrier Reef has enjoyed World Heritage Status and been…

Got an idea to protect our oceans? Here is $10k to make it happen.

In recent years, there has been a growing global understanding of the importance in establishing marine protected areas (MPA) in our oceans. These sanctuaries serve a fundamental role in creating safe spaces for fish to spawn and grow before spilling out into the open ocean to benefit environmental rejuvenation and fisheries alike. These have been…

Underwater Cultural Heritage As A Potential Environmental Time Bomb

In the area known as the Pacific theater of World War II, there are about “3800 underwater wrecks—submarines, airplanes, ship, and other remnants of hard fought battles.  And, that war produced 7800 such wrecks worldwide from all of the participating nations.  Beyond their solemn history (and possible continuing service as watery human gravesites), there are…

London Could Become a National Park … Sign Up to Be a Founder!

Sign-up now to show your support in making London a national park in Britain—and be entered into the list of its founders!

Gar Spotted in the Windy City: First Occurrence of the Primitive Fish

Guest post by Solomon David, postdoctoral research associate, Shedd Aquarium Last week, when colleague Phil Willink showed me photos sent to him by the Illinois Department of Natural Resources (IDNR) I was excited by what I saw; an elongate fish with a toothy snout, like an alligator with fins instead of legs, the tell-tale traits…