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Tag archives for conservation

Kikeo and The Whale

Kikeo and The Whale is a bedtime story that submerges the young reader in a sea of dreams. Hand-in-hand with National Geographic Creative photographer Kike Calvo, the reader discovers a beautiful story of an encounter between Kikeo, the main character,  and a baby whale and her mom. “This children’s book comes at a time when…

Leopards of India’s Silicon City

Post submitted by Sanjay Gubbi, Scientist Nature Conservation Foundation.   Bangalore, a southern Indian city, has become synonymous with information technology and is one of a few metropolis in the world that hosts large wild mammals such as elephants, leopards, sloth bears and even tigers within a distance of a few kilometers from the center of…

Competition Between Carnivores: Untangling the Relationship Between Pumas, Black Bears, and Deer

By Max Allen of the Santa Cruz Puma Project Pumas and black bears are the two large carnivores found throughout California. Both species kill deer and other ungulates and as a result they often compete with each other. In Mendocino National Forest, where I completed my PhD project, black-tailed deer, including adults and fawns, make…

Lions Have a New Guardian: The U.S. Government

“The lion is one of the planet’s most beloved species and an irreplaceable part of our shared global heritage. If we want to ensure that healthy lion populations continue to roam the African savannas and forests of India, it’s up to all of us – not just the people of Africa and India – to…

Skadar Lake – Joining Forces to Save the Last Breeding Colony of Dalmatian Pelicans in Montenegro

Since the 17th century, 80% of the Dalmatian Pelican’s breeding sites have disappeared, but efforts in Montenegro’s Lake Skadar aim to protect and stabilize its population.

Pet Cats Deserve Responsible Owners

It’s the end of the grey-faced petrel breeding season in New Zealand and hugely exciting to see the seabird chicks emerging from their underground burrows for the first time literally stretching their wings. It’s also equal parts horrendous to see neighbourhood cats walking at leisure through the sensitive breeding grounds of these birds recovering from centuries of hunting.

Nations Strike Deal to Curb Carbon Emissions

The first pact to commit all countries to cut carbon emissions—the Paris Agreement—was signed by 195 countries in LeBourget, France, on Saturday. Some aspects of the agreement, which will go into effect in 2020, will be legally binding, such as submission of emissions reduction targets and regular review of progress toward them. However, the targets…

Proving the Exception: Coexistence between human and lions is possible

It has been all over the news recently – every headline painting a grim future for wild lions, a future where they could potentially disappear completely. According to a recent study, lion populations in West, Central and East Africa are likely to drop by 50% in the next twenty years. But the continuing cub boom…

What Are We Actually Protecting In The Ocean?

One of the great recent success stories in conservation is the rapid increase in the establishment of marine protected areas (MPAs). Since 2006, there has been a staggering growth of 10 million km2 of new MPAs globally, a nearly four-fold increase over the past decade. Yet there has been no baseline for measuring how well our marine species are represented in protected areas. Until now.

A new paper we have published in Nature’s Scientific Reports assesses the overlap of global MPAs with the ranges of 17,348 marine species (fishes, mammals, invertebrates). We have discovered some sobering results: most marine species are not well represented within MPAs and several hundred species are not covered at all.

Paris’s Shortcomings: We Need Conservation, Not Conversation

By the time the Paris Agreement reaches full power in 2020, we may have lost another 1.5 billion acres of tropical forest.

Paris Agreement Catalyzes Global Cooperation Toward a Low-Carbon Future

Worker’s clean solar panels for maximum efficiency at the power solar facility in Lancaster, California. Photo credit: © Dave Lauridsen for The Nature Conservancy By Lynn Scarlett, Managing Director of Public Policy and Global Climate for The Nature Conservancy Paris is again in the news—and, this time, as host to nearly all the world’s nations who…

Watch: Adorable Amur Tiger Cubs, New Hope for Endangered Species

Post written by Dr. Maria (Masha) N. Vorontsova. I am delighted to share with you this just captured, rare footage of Zolushka (Cinderella in Russian), playing with her two new cubs in the wild of Bastak Reserve in Far East Russia.

As Paris Delegates Debate Emissions, Climate Adaptation Is Finding Solutions

While world leaders at the Conference of Parties (COP) meetings in Paris negotiate reductions of global carbon emissions, a number of organizations are already working to implement solutions to the problems those emissions create. Many conservation and development institutions are focused on applied solutions to both the current and future impacts of climate change. Such efforts are helping wildlife and ecosystems adapt to changing climatic conditions.

The mysterious life of Mister K: a seahorse life history study in Cambodia

Guest post by Delphine Duplain and Amick Haissoune, project coordinators at Marine Conservation Cambodia, in conjunction with Dr. Tse-Lynn Loh, postdoctoral research associate at Shedd Aquarium Once upon a time, there were some buoys marking the edges of our house reef off Koh Seh in Kep Province, Cambodia, thus protecting the reef from passing boats. Surprisingly,…

Meet the Explorers Crossing the World’s 20 Largest Glaciers for Climate Change

Over the course of ten years, polar explorer and National Geographic grantee Børge Ousland and his expedition partner, Vincent Colliard, are crossing the world’s 20 largest glaciers to document climate change. But traversing some of the harshest landscapes on Earth won’t keep these two adventurers from having a good time.