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Underwater Cultural Heritage As A Potential Environmental Time Bomb

In the area known as the Pacific theater of World War II, there are about “3800 underwater wrecks—submarines, airplanes, ship, and other remnants of hard fought battles.  And, that war produced 7800 such wrecks worldwide from all of the participating nations.  Beyond their solemn history (and possible continuing service as watery human gravesites), there are…

London Could Become a National Park … Sign Up to Be a Founder!

Sign-up now to show your support in making London a national park in Britain—and be entered into the list of its founders!

Gar Spotted in the Windy City: First Occurrence of the Primitive Fish

Guest post by Solomon David, postdoctoral research associate, Shedd Aquarium Last week, when colleague Phil Willink showed me photos sent to him by the Illinois Department of Natural Resources (IDNR) I was excited by what I saw; an elongate fish with a toothy snout, like an alligator with fins instead of legs, the tell-tale traits…

10 Tips for Incredible Aerial Images

Acclaimed National Geographic photographer Michael Melford works with LightHawk to make aerial photographs that support conservation. He shares some of his secrets to making the most of his opportunities to fly with LightHawk.

Busting Indonesia’s Manta Gill Trade

This article is brought to you by the International League of Conservation Photographers (iLCP). Read our other articles on the National Geographic News Watch blog featuring the work of our iLCP Fellow Photographers all around the world. Text and photos by iLCP Fellow Paul Hilton. Writing this from a hotel room in Indonesia’s second-largest city, Surabaya, I realize…

Photographing the Global Reef Expedition: Australia’s Great Barrier Reef

This article is brought to you by the International League of Conservation Photographers (iLCP). Read our other articles on the National Geographic News Watch blog featuring the work of our iLCP Fellow Photographers all around the world. Text and photos by iLCP Fellow Jürgen Freund on expedition with iLCP partner, The Khaled bin Sultan Living Oceans Foundation. In 2003, my wife…

Flooding the Landscape: The Site C Dam on B.C.’s Peace River

This article is brought to you by the International League of Conservation Photographers (iLCP). Read our other articles on the National Geographic News Watch blog featuring the work of our iLCP Fellow Photographers all around the world. Text and Photos by iLCP Fellow Garth Lenz. As the small Piper Super Cub climbs, this beautiful valley spreads out below…

You Cannot Save the Climate Without Trees

The People’s Climate March that trumpeted its way through the streets of Manhattan yesterday was led by communities on the front lines of climate change—and Indigenous Peoples were at the forefront of this group.  The tropical forests where they live are not only getting hammered by changing weather patterns, drug traffickers, invasive pests, and massive…

Bobcats Prowl Among Us: Haunt Birdfeeders, Brooks, Boulevards

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It’s on the prowl from three hours before sunset until midnight, and again before dawn ‘til three hours after sunrise.  Each night, it moves two to seven miles, mostly on the same route. Along the way it visits, like the humans in whose shadow it lives, known locales.  But its stomping grounds are a hollow…

Bangladesh Vows to Protect Wild Tigers in Spite of Industrialization

By Joseph Allchin

Dhaka, Bangladesh–Bangladesh’s prime minister, Sheikh Hasina, opened a major international conference on tiger conservation in the country’s capital, Dhaka, on Sunday. With delegates from all 13 tiger range countries in attendance, Hasina stated that her “government will do everything for conservation of the tigers,” lamenting “indiscriminate industrialization,” as a chief threat to habitats.

Bangladesh’s government is, however, involved in several industrial projects controversially located very close to the country’s sole remaining tiger habitat, the largest contiguous mangroves in the world, the Sundarbans.

Protecting Antarctic Marine Ecosystems: From Anemones to Whales

Over the past few years, I’ve written a lot about efforts to create marine protected areas (MPAs) in the Southern Ocean. For someone like me, who works on these issues and studies the Antarctic environment, the justification for MPAs is obvious. Antarctic ecosystems are bursting with incredible marine life, much of which we have yet…

Transforming Indonesia’s Manta Fisheries

This article is brought to you by the International League of Conservation Photographers (iLCP). Read our other articles on the National Geographic News Watch blog featuring the work of our iLCP Fellow Photographers all around the world. Text and photos by iLCP Fellow Shawn Heinrichs Transforming Indonesia’s Manta Fisheries: The path to creating an effective Manta Sanctuary Indonesia announced…

Zambia’s Hunting “Bans”—Shedding Light on a Complicated History

By Katarzyna Nowak

On August 21, Zambia was reported to have “lifted its hunting ban,” announcing that a ban on hunting big cats—leopards and lions—would remain. One week later, an addendum was issued by the Zambian Wildlife Authority (ZAWA), clarifying that the hunting ban would remain in effect for elephants too.

However, confusion endures in the media, such as in a September 9 article on Mongabay: “Zambia ends trophy hunting ban, elephants fair game.”

Was there ever a hunting ban in Zambia, has Zambia resumed hunting, and will elephants be hunted?

New Species for the IUCN Red List

The biodiversity of life on Earth is disappearing faster than at any time in human history. Among the many people sounding the alarm of our disappearing natural history the IUCN Red List is the instrument that is used to measure biodiversity loss and the species that are most at risk of extinction. People like Elizabeth…

Maasai Steppe Warrior for Wildlife Elvis Kisimir Speaks Up for Lions

“In a few years to come, the world will only see the rare lion spoor on the sandy soil. If the wind blows, then even those spoor will go.” One extraordinary Maasai warrior shares his message for the world about the future of big cats. Elvis Kisimir experiences the full extent of familial responsibility while…