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Indonesia’s Indigenous Communities Use Ecotourism To Secure the Rights to their Land

From Chandra Kirana in Bogor, Indonesia. Six Indigenous communities have launched an ecotourism initiative that would show off their ancestral forests in a bid to develop alternate economic models that local government in Indonesia could embrace, moving away from extractive industries such as mining and palm oil plantations. The initiative, called GreenIndonesia, would ultimately help…

Flying Over After a Hurricane

Soon after Hurricane Odile roared through Cabo San Lucas and the far end of Baja California with 120 mile-per-hour winds, LightHawk was in the air to document the extensive wind and flood damage left by the Category 3 storm. LightHawk’s Mesoamerica program manager Armando J. Ubeda worked to bring the expedition together quickly. National Geographic…

Vote Now For Most Beautiful Parrot In Africa!

Absolutely stunning! Our amazing Cape parrots take my breath away every time! Proud, vibrant, wild parrots! Please vote for the Cape parrot as South Africa’s favourite bird and help us raise the public profile of this little-known endemic species. Around 1,000 Cape parrots remain in the last yellowwood forests of South Africa. Take a few seconds to…

Galapagos Popular Pit Stop for Pregnant Whale Sharks

By Gloria Dickie, Turtle Island Restoration Network Intern With 13 major islands and over 100 rocky islets, the Galapagos Islands are a dream destination for many adventurous travelers, but their popularity isn’t limited to the scuba diving crowd. A new study co-authored by Turtle Island’s Conservation Science Director Alex Hearn reveals the Galapagos Islands are…

Primate Discoveries in Northwest Kenya

Even when you’re focused on studying warthogs, you can’t help but make some intriguing observations and discoveries about other animals along the way.

Top 10 Photos of a Year in America’s Serengeti

These images remind me of the different lenses through which we experience the outdoors and how even long term progress can be captured in a split second.

ESSAY: Infighting Over Whether to Trade in Elephant Ivory and Rhino Horn Jeopardizes Both Species

From Michael Schwartz: For every action, there is an equal and opposite reaction. Isaac Newton’s third law of motion is certainly an adequate illustration of the ongoing pugilism between pro-trade and anti-trade advocacy groups concerning the battle to protect remaining elephant and rhinoceros populations in Africa.

Galápagos Tourism Backfires

A squabble over tourism dollars has escalated into a dire threat to the islands’ renowned Charles Darwin Research Station. Rampant tourism growth without adequate management now endangers scientific conservation work—the very work that helps protect the creatures tourists want to see.

North America’s Smallest Carnivore Gets a New Coat for Winter

Many grassland species are uniquely adapted to life on the snowy plains, but the Least weasel (Mustela nivalis) completely commits to its cold weather camouflage. As autumn comes to an end, this mini carnivore sheds its dark fur for a solid white coat that helps it evade predators like hawks and owls hovering overhead. And the…

14 Ocean Conservation Wins of 2014

Chances are you’ve come across some ocean news lately. And it may even have been positive! Yes, the ocean is still in serious trouble due to overfishing, pollution, climate change, and habitat destruction, but there are more and more success stories to point to, and point I shall. #1. Big year for big marine reserves. Kiribati,…

Feeding Conservation: An African Vision for Restoring Biodiversity

By Dale Lewis

Since 2003, the non-profit company Community Markets for Conservation (COMACO) has been working in Zambia to help poor farmers improve their skills, grow surpluses, and receive above-market prices for their produce in exchange for meeting conservation targets. In managing the production and sale of these nutritious and chemical-free products, COMACO has committed itself to passing on above-market-price profits to farmers in the form of raw materials if they commit to conservation.

The Next New Species Could be in Your Backyard: Why Exploration and Discovery Matter – Everywhere

Gregory M. Mueller, Ph.D. Chief Scientist and Negaunee Foundation Vice President of Science Chicago Botanic Garden When we think about discovering new species, we tend to envision tropical rainforests, remote deserts or lofty mountain peaks. But researchers, including myself, are taking a closer look at the landscapes right under our noses – in my case,…

A Ghost in the Making: Photographing the Rusty-patched Bumble Bee

Over the last 15 years the range of the Rusty-Patched Bumble Bee has shrunk by 87% and it has become one of the rarest bees in North America.

Mangrove deforestation in Madagascar: What are the options?

The last time you heard from us at Blue Ventures, my colleague Garth Cripps was talking about shark fishing on Madagascar’s west coast.  Here Dr. Trevor Jones, our Blue Carbon Science guru, talks about his favorite coastal ecosystem, mangrove forests, and some of the ways we’re looking to partner with communities for their conservation. Take…

Tools for Science – On expedition with the Living Oceans Foundation

This article is brought to you by the International League of Conservation Photographers (iLCP). Read our other articles on the National Geographic Voices blog featuring the work of our iLCP Fellow Photographers all around the world. Text and photos by Jürgen Freund, Fellow at the International League of Conservation Photographers. The Khaled bin Sultan Living Oceans Foundation is circumnavigating…