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Tag archives for desert

Bat-Survey Lesson No. 42: Don’t Step on Any Lions

Northwestern Namibia’s desert may appear barren, but it is full of life as the dry season and Young Explorers Grantee Theresa Laverty’s pilot field season conclude.

From Running Water to No Water: In Search of Desert Bats

The search for water in the Namib Desert continues as we net for bats over a stretch of the running Hoarusib River and then pursue active springs on our way back through the Hoanib River.

Elephants on the Ground, Bats in the Sky, and Rivers Running Underground

Finding “safe” netting sites is not always easy as we discovered while on the Huab River during our quest to learn more about the desert bats of Namibia.

A Bat-tastic Beginning for 2015!

After catching bats all night, I crawled into my tent at 11:59 PM and counted down to the New Year, listening to lions call in the distance and a hyena whooping nearby …

Bats Big and Small in the World’s Oldest Desert

Vying with desert elephants for a spot at waterholes at night, NG Young Explorer Grantee Theresa Laverty begins her search for insect-eating bats along northwestern Namibia’s dry riverbeds.

From Mega to Mini: Tracing Surprising Animal Connections

Two and a half years after my last stint living in Africa, I’m putting the large mammals aside to search for animals that are much smaller, but instill much fear in people around the world—bats.

Under the Desert Sun: Journey through the California Desert

iLCP Fellow Krista Schlyer captures the beauty of the California desert and the impact that energy development is having on the region. If there is a poster-child for the potential and already realized devastation energy development could bring to the wild desert, the tortoise is it. These hardy, desert-adapted creatures have suffered a 40-year decline due to human development of various sorts. They have lost 90 percent of their population despite being a protected species for most of that time.

Watch Death Valley’s Rocks Walk Before Your Eyes

Scientist believe they’ve solved the mystery of Death Valley’s “walking” rocks.

Geography in the News: The Strangest Desert

By Neal Lineback and Mandy Lineback Gritzner, Geography in the NewsTM The Strange Namib Desert of Africa Africa seems to always be in the news covering conflict and disease across the continent. Its wonderful physical diversity, however, provides a background that is often overlooked by the casual reader. The Namib Desert is just one of…

March 30, 2014: Skiing Everest, Mission Blue, Search for Michael Rockefeller, Violent Animal Reproduction, and More

Join radio host Boyd Matson every week for adventure, conservation and green science. This week his guests try to solve the mystery of the disappearance of Michael Rockefeller, figure out if Mother Nature is really trying to kill you, ski off the seven summits including Everest, look inside the city of Damascus during the Syrian War, dive into Mission Blue with Sylvia Earle, look at how much food we waste each year, take a walk on the surface of Mars, and find out what we should pack on a camping trip.

February 15, 2014: California’s Drought, Inside the Human Brain, a 1,000 Mile Desert Trek and More

Join radio host Boyd Matson every week for adventure, conservation and green science. This week they are trekking 1,000 miles through the Empty Quarter Desert, searching for the lost civilization of Shangri La, looking at the implications of California’s severe drought, walking through Chinatowns, researching the human brain, getting a visit from the Love Doctor, and learning what makes Russians smile.

Emptying the Desert

By Dr. Sarah Durant, Zoological Society of London, Wildlife Conservation Society, and National Geographic’s Big Cats Initiative There are few landscapes more evocative and beautiful than the sweeping sands and majestic mountains of the Sahara desert. This land used to be widely populated by large animals uniquely adapted to the harsh and unpredictable desert environment. Their…

August 18, 2013: Saving Children in Ethiopia, Reigning In Our Sweet Tooth, and More

This week, we stop an ancient Ethiopian curse, then we explore Iran using century-old images, and finally, we power homes using gas from human waste.

“Borrego Stardance” Timelapse Shows Beauty of Desert Sky

Gavin Heffernan, the filmmaker behind the mesmerizing timelapse “Death Valley Dreamlapse,” has released a new video, “Borrego Stardance” (also view above). This new gem was shot in Borrego Springs, California, a small desert town surrounded by the 600,000-acre Anzo-Borrego State Park. (It’s roughly three hours south of Los Angeles.) Via email, Heffernan said, “In addition…

Geography in the News: Death Valley’s Dangers

By Neal Lineback and Mandy Lineback Gritzner, Geography in the NewsTM Death Valley’s Dangers One of the most inhospitable places on earth claims lives frequently. Death Valley, Calif., is a desperate place to be, never more than this year, as temperatures have approached the world’s record. Forecasts are for the daily high temperatures to reach…