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Tag archives for Development

Smart Time, Smart Place for Smart Energy

By Nels Johnson, Director – North America Energy, The Nature Conservancy One of my strongest childhood memories is the smell of dust and sagebrush on a warm summer morning over four decades ago, delivered in a bouncing, open truck driven through the Badlands of North Dakota. We drove along and across the Little Missouri River…

Why cooperation, sharing and co-creating are key to solving climate crisis

By Morten Kabell, Mayor of Technical and Environmental Affairs of Copenhagen Cooperation. Including our citizens. Getting the companies on board. These are all ways that we – that I – have talked about partnerships and cooperation in the past. Yet there has always been a tiny bit of doubt hovering in the back of my mind. This…

Financing Sustainable Global Cities of the Future

By Hanna Gronkiewicz-Waltz, Mayor of Warsaw, Poland This article originally appeared on Huffington Post.  Today I am speaking at the Chicago Forum on Global Cities on a panel called Financing the Global City, where fellow panelists and I will discuss various approaches to financing sustainable infrastructure and the need for collaboration with other levels of government and…

Why Are Syrian Aid Workers Leaving for Europe?

Gaziantep, Turkey — Frustration. In a city that has become known for its dynamic activist community, weariness is starting to show in a network that has been stretched by donor fatigue, occupational burnout, and the opportunity of starting over far away. Located only 50 kilometers away from the Syrian border and home to more than 200,000 refugees, Gaziantep has…

Rising Tides Can’t Stop the Dancing in Kiribati

When I walked into Tarawa Island’s only air-conditioned coffee shop I was expecting to escape the 90° F heat, enjoy an iced coffee, and—if the Internet signal was strong enough—send an email. Instead I found myself face-to-face with the president of Kiribati. That chance encounter soon turned into a three-day journey to President Anote Tong’s…

The New Sustainable Development Goals: a Vision for Living in Harmony with Nature

There is now clearer recognition that sustainable development and biodiversity conservation are inextricably linked and that one cannot succeed without the other. The UN’s new Sustainable Development Goals address conservation of both terrestrial and marine ecosystems. The new agenda specifies that UN member states will “conserve and sustainably use oceans and seas, freshwater resources, as well as forests, mountains and drylands and to protect biodiversity, ecosystems and wildlife.” And SDG targets specifically refer to endangered species, calling for an end to wildlife poaching and trafficking.

The Arctic Is Changing … Or Is It?

While the world is captivated by the environmental changes in the far north, the people who live there are eager for changes of another kind.

The Muslim Miners of Mongolia

Dedicated to exploring the connections between society and the environment, Saleem H. Ali reflects on a visit to a small mining town in Mongolia which hosts a diverse cultural heritage and is planning for a sustainable future.

Orangutan Rescue in the Land of the Chainsaw

As Sumatra’s rainforests get bulldozed to make way for oil palm plantations, large mammals like the Sumatran Orangutan get trapped in ever decreasing pockets of forest, from which they need to be rescued for their health and safety.

Does it fit? Tsina Endor on making peace with the taboo in rural Madagascar

In the ancestor worshipping religion practiced across Madagascar’s 18 tribes, the zebu – a species of domestic cattle originating in South Asia – is integral to marking life’s milestones. When a child gets its first haircut, the clippings are stirred into zebu back fat and eaten by family members with a rum chaser; when a…

WWF’s Living Planet Report echoed on the Great Barrier Reef

The Great Barrier Reef is the largest coral reef ecosystem on the planet composed of almost 3000 individual reefs. For decades, the Great Barrier Reef has enjoyed World Heritage Status and been synonymous with diving, tourism and with Australia. But the reef is under threat of industrial development projects. Text and Photos by James Morgan.

Political and Weather Climates are Changing, But at What Speed?

The weather in Washington, D.C. finally turned hot in September, just in time for Congress to resume. We enjoyed an unusually moderate summer this year, with many days topping out in the high seventies or low eighties. Plenty of sun. San Diego weather, you might say. Before September, we were missing about two full weeks…

The Last Spring: Protecting Florida’s Manatees

iLCP Fellow and Founder Cristina Goettsch Mittermeier, writes about her work with iLCP Fellow photographer Paul Nickels, doing a story on the Florida manatee. The Three Sisters Springs is one of the last remaining strongholds for this precious mammal. The warm waters that seep out of the ground year round are critically important to manatees during the cold winter months, when the water temperature drops below 68 degrees. In 2013 a record 829 manatee deaths were attributed to cold shock, underscoring the importance of these last few springs to this endangered mammal’s survival.

A Bottom-Line Focus For Solving Mining Conflicts

The lure of precious metals and other natural resources has long been a source of conflict in Latin America, from the Andes to the Amazon and most everywhere else.  But new research has begun to put a price tag on this conflict, and investors have started to respond. When the lives and livelihoods of Indigenous…

America Resilient

Since we last celebrated Earth Day a year ago, 29 states have experienced 99 Federal disaster declarations. Fires, floods, mudslides, hurricanes, and tornadoes have devastated the United States, causing billions of dollars of damage, destroying thousands of homes, and up-ending people’s lives.