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Tag archives for diving

Diving Deep Below Arctic Ice to Bring Back Our Ocean’s Skeletons: #bestjobever

Polar expeditions to explore the ocean are not for the faint of heart. Above the water’s surface, you better be on alert for polar bears. Below, you better be game for diving 60 feet under sea ice into freezing temperatures. Watch National Geographic grantee Branwen Williams lead a team to the Canadian Arctic to do both in an effort to better understand how our oceans and the climate are changing over time.

Filming a Time-Lapse of a Dolphin Carcass on the Seafloor Is No Easy Task

Learn how marine biologist Eddie Kisfaludy filmed the first long-term, time-lapse video of a dolphin carcass on the seafloor.

Submarine Diving in Deep-Sea Galápagos: #bestjobever

What’s it like to submarine dive a thousand feet underwater to an unexplored region of the Galápagos Islands? Marine conservationist and National Geographic Emerging Explorer Jessica Cramp takes us on a journey to find out.

The manta in the mirror

By John Weller and Shawn Heinrichs A meeting of minds Chain upon chain of jagged islands jutted up from the sea. Dense vegetation clung to black, pitted rock walls that dropped sharply into cerulean blue lagoons. A Sulfur-crested Cockatoo landed in the top of a tree, its raucous call bouncing around the cliffs before daring out…

So you live near a coral reef: Why experts say that’s not good news for reef conservation

Co-authored by Erica Cirino My favorite beach on Long Island’s North Shore, where I live, is more than 700 miles away from the nearest coral reef (in Bermuda). This distance may be a good thing: Recent research suggests the further a coral reef is from human civilization, the better. (To get close from far away,…

Palau: Leading by Example

If there is one country that leads by example, it’s Palau. This is a strong country, one that was a battleground for World War II, it has survived typhoons and earthquakes, and still the Palauans persevere. While their culture shows some Western influence, Palauan traditions remain steadfast. They thrive in one of the most beautiful,…

Swimming Among Pilot Whales in the Far North

We are not yet in Greenland, nor are we near Canada. We’re right smack dab in the middle of Davis Strait. The water is nearly 9,000 feet deep and I’m suited up like an astronaut.

Tune in: LIVE Twitter Chat With Explorer Paul Rose

Tweet your questions about ocean conservation @Paul_Rose using #NatGeoLive and join us Thursday, March 19th at 10 a.m. ET!

The Global Reef Expedition: Palau

The coral reefs of Palau hold approximately 400 species of hard corals, 300 species of soft corals, and 1400 species of reef fish. Palau is internationally renown for its beautiful landscapes and seascapes as well as its biological significance to the environment. The Khaled bin Sultan Living Oceans Foundation undertook its third expedition with the International League of Conservation Photographers in this fabled archipelago, working with iLCP Fellow Keith Ellenbogen.

10 Hidden Gems From a Year in Exploration

With National Geographic explorers sharing more than 350 stories from the field this year, chances are you missed a few. Here are some lost treasures we hope you’ll enjoy.

Tools for Science – On expedition with the Living Oceans Foundation

This article is brought to you by the International League of Conservation Photographers (iLCP). Read our other articles on the National Geographic Voices blog featuring the work of our iLCP Fellow Photographers all around the world. Text and photos by Jürgen Freund, Fellow at the International League of Conservation Photographers. The Khaled bin Sultan Living Oceans Foundation is circumnavigating…

Life in the Great Barrier Reef

The Khaled bin Sultan Living Oceans Foundation conducts scientific surveys on coral reefs around the world to determine the health and resilience of the reef. The primary scientific goals of the Expeditions are to map and characterize coral reef ecosystems, identify their current status and major threats, and examine factors that enhance their ability to resist, survive and recover from major disturbance events like bleaching, cyclone damage, or Crown of Thorns outbreaks. iLCP Fellow Jürgen Freund documents an expedition to the magnificent Great Barrier Reef.

WWF’s Living Planet Report echoed on the Great Barrier Reef

The Great Barrier Reef is the largest coral reef ecosystem on the planet composed of almost 3000 individual reefs. For decades, the Great Barrier Reef has enjoyed World Heritage Status and been synonymous with diving, tourism and with Australia. But the reef is under threat of industrial development projects. Text and Photos by James Morgan.

Photographing the Global Reef Expedition: Australia’s Great Barrier Reef

For two weeks, iLCP Fellow Jürgen Freund joined the Living Oceans Foundation’s Great Barrier Reef mission to photographically document the Great Barrier Reef and the science that happened on board and underwater. Text and photos by Jürgen Freund.

The Coral Triangle: Amazon of the Oceans

Home to over three quarters of the world’s coral species, The Coral Triangle is the underwater equivalent of the Amazon. It encompasses an area half the size of the United States and harbours more marine species than anywhere else on the planet. From Borneo down to the edge of the South Pacific, the Coral Triangle has some of the most breathtaking underwater landscapes, but the majority are buckling under the pressures of overfishing, resource extraction and climate change. Text and Photos by iLCP Fellow James Morgan.