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Explorers and Students Team Up to Start the Year Off With a ROAR

Sharing firsthand experiences and lessons from the field, National Geographic Big Cats Initiative explorers are helping spread their boundless knowledge and affection for the wild to the next generation.

Could Climate Change Keep Kids Out of School?

By Lisa Palmer

Education is seen as a key tool for building resilience to climate change in the developing world. But new research shows that climate change could also make it harder to keep kids in school and ensure they get the best out of their time in the classroom.

Heather Randell, a postdoctoral fellow at the National Socio-Environmental Synthesis Center, a research institute funded by the National Science Foundation and the University of Maryland, studies the relationships between environmental change, development, and human health and wellbeing. Her research focuses on the social processes underlying migration, the links between development and rural livelihoods, and the social and health impacts of environmental change.

Our Seed Stories – a Participatory Educational Media Project this School Year

Join me this school year on my journey to India to learn about seed saving, community food systems, and how to cultivate a future for biodiversity!

9/11: Remembering Ann and Joe

Ford Cochran’s moving tribute to Ann Judge and Joe Ferguson is an enduring reminder of the two incredible friends and colleagues who lost their lives while on assignment for National Geographic. With them were three standout Washington, D.C., teachers—James Debeunere, Sarah Clark, and Hilda Taylor—and three of their star sixth-grade students—Rodney Dickens, Asia Cottom, and Bernard Brown. They had been selected by the District’s Geographic Alliance to participate with oceanographer and National Geographic Explorer-in-Residence Sylvia Earle in a research project titled the Sustainable Seas Expeditions.

Woods Hole Science Aquarium update: One internship ending, new doors opening

By Jessica Perelman Jessica is a recent graduate of the University of Southern California with a degree in biological sciences. She will attend veterinary school next year and plans to pursue a career in wildlife and conservation veterinary medicine. When I first stepped through the doors at the Woods Hole Science Aquarium ten weeks ago, I…

Engaging Learners From Afar with Shedd Aquarium’s Iguana Field Research

The following is a blog post by Jackie Formoso, Manager of Learning Programs at Shedd Aquarium, about her experience co-leading Shedd’s research on Bahamian rock iguanas in the Exuma Islands. As part of Shedd Aquarium’s ongoing commitment to preserving wildlife for future generations, we have a team of scientists who are working hard to study endangered species,…

Becoming Naturalists at the E.O. Wilson Biophilia Center

At the E.O. Wilson Biophilia Center in East Freeport, Florida, children are learning about nature by experiencing it firsthand. Developed by Walton County conservationist M.C. Davis in 2009, the Center sits on the 50,000-acre Nokuse Plantation. Paul Arthur, president of Nokuse Education Inc. and director of E.O. Wilson Biophilia Center for the past five years,…

NOAA Animal Husbandry and Public Education Internship: Woods Hole Science Aquarium

By Jessica Perelman Through the generous support of The Safina Center, I have just begun my summer as an animal husbandry and public education intern at the Woods Hole Science Aquarium (WHSA). I am a 2016 graduate of the University of Southern California with a degree in biological sciences, and want to share my experiences…

A New USAID-funded Community-based Conservation Initiative Launches in Northern Tanzania

Several years ago, the African People & Wildlife Fund integrated rangeland management into its four-step process towards long-term conservation success in Tanzania. Recently, a collaboration of ten organizations kicked off a five-year project to ensure that Tanzania’s rangelands, ecosystems, and the communities within those ecosystems, are protected.  By the African People & Wildlife Fund Wildlife…

He Bought Them Lunch. They Learned How To Read.

Reyhanli, Turkey — Early in the morning and late at night, sounds of shelling from across the mountain disrupt the seemingly tranquil border town. “If you’d been here a few nights earlier, when the Russians were bombing, you would have felt the whole ground shake,” Waled Dabak tells me inside his Reyhanli home. “The entire city…

Peru Affords Full Protection to World’s Largest Known Manta Population

In a significant move to safeguard the world’s largest known manta population, Peru’s Ministry of Production announced on January 1, strong regulations to protect the oceanic manta ray. It is now illegal to target, capture, and retain a manta ray or trade in any manta parts across their entire range, from Peru to Ecuador, where they are already legally protected.

Educating Future Guardians of the Galápagos

The Lindblad Expeditions-National Geographic (LEX-NG) Fund aims to protect the last wild places in the ocean while facilitating conservation, research, education, and community development programs in the places we explore. This blog entry spotlights some of the exciting work our grantees are doing with support from the LEX-NG Fund. What comes to mind when you…

The New Sustainable Development Goals: a Vision for Living in Harmony with Nature

There is now clearer recognition that sustainable development and biodiversity conservation are inextricably linked and that one cannot succeed without the other. The UN’s new Sustainable Development Goals address conservation of both terrestrial and marine ecosystems. The new agenda specifies that UN member states will “conserve and sustainably use oceans and seas, freshwater resources, as well as forests, mountains and drylands and to protect biodiversity, ecosystems and wildlife.” And SDG targets specifically refer to endangered species, calling for an end to wildlife poaching and trafficking.

The World’s Newest Batch of Brilliance

Explore this year’s Google Science Fair finalists’ projects from concept to blueprint to final execution, and get to know the young students of today who just may be the scientific leaders of tomorrow.

Not all Dragons Breathe Fire

Dragons have been present in human folklore for centuries, appearing as heroes and villains in the pages of children’s books, Hollywood summer blockbusters, and popular television shows. But to me, dragons are just another part of my day job. As the senior wild animal keeper for the Herpetology Department at the Bronx Zoo in New York City, I am responsible for the care and management of the four Komodo dragons that are currently part of our collection. While these dragons do not breathe fire and have not stolen away princesses, they still possess the beauty, power, and majesty of their fictional brethren.