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Tag archives for endangered species

Grévys Zebra now protected in Kenya by Samburu Warriors

More closely related to an ass than a horse, the Grevy’s zebra (Equus grevyi) is the world’s largest living wild equid. The Grevy’s zebra has a stripe pattern as unique as a human fingerprint, and large round ears. Once used in Roman circuses, it was forgotten by the western world for a millennium, until it was named…

Phantom of the Forest: Could the Cougar Again Haunt Eastern U.S. Woodlands?

The phantom, it’s been called, this big cat that now prowls western North and South America forests from the Yukon to Patagonia. It has dozens of monikers, from panther to puma to mountain lion, catamount to deer tiger to cougar. However it may be known, could the feline, long gone from the U.S. East but…

Global Shark Conservation: Good News for Some Species, Alarming Trends for Others

Reversing overfishing, climate change, and population growth can seem insurmountable. Safina Center Fellows strive to amplify the global conservation discussion and, in targeted ways and places, they make a difference. Their drive to redefine the future of our planet starts with the belief that progress is possible. —Carl Safina In the following interview, shark experts…

This Deadly-Looking Leopard Is Actually Fun to Photograph

National Geographic photographer Steve Winter comes face-to-face with a family of leopards as part of his work to help protect these stunning creatures.

On World Rhino Day, Borana Conservancy celebrates 2 years as a Rhino Sanctuary

The black rhinoceros has roamed the earth for five million years, yet it is now facing the greatest threat in its history – from poaching. According to the International Union for Conservation of Nature, the black rhino is ‘teetering on the brink of extinction’. There are just over 5,000 left in the wild in Africa; in Kenya alone,…

Marine life on the line

It reads like a mystery novel; the search continues for a blue whale entangled in a buoy line, heading towards Mexico from southern California. First spotted on September 4th off the coast of San Pedro, rescue teams tried to free the 80-foot whale but rough seas and failing light meant the operation had to be…

New Parks in Alberta’s Castle Wilderness Boost International Conservation Efforts

Conservationists rejoiced as Shannon Phillips, Alberta’s Minister of Environment and Parks, announced the province’s new government would create two parks totaling 104,000 hectares (a quarter of a million acres) in the mountainous Castle area last Friday. It marked the turning point in a forty year effort to protect this spectacular and biologically diverse area that…

Pledge to Restore Wild Buffalo Unites First Nations of North America

Can the return of a wild animal to its native range help people? Many North American Plains Indians are sure that bringing back wild bison can do just that. This month in Banff National Park three bands of the Stoney Nakoda First Nation and the Samson Cree Nation joined several other tribes to sign the…

Tracking Desert Rhinos On Foot In Namibia

Desert rhino tracking on foot took us deep into the rocky mountains and gravel plains of Damaraland. We were inside the 450,000-hectare Palmwag Concession, where rhinos roam freely across the desert of Namibia. Desert-adapted black rhinos have large home ranges and aren’t easy to find, even for local trackers. Over the past 30 years, the…

Black Rhino return to Samburu-Land

In the shadow of Mount Kenya lie the hot lowlands of Samburu-land. This vast, beautiful region of rocky ridges, acacia grasslands and doum palm forest is the traditional homeland of the Samburu people, the rare Grevy’s zebra and the Gerenuk antelope. For thousands of years, it was also home to the black rhino, until the…

Zebra Sharks: Gentle, Sweet and Disappearing

Guest post by Lise Watson, Wild Reef collections manager, Shedd Aquarium I’ve been passionate about sharks ever since I started working with them in the mid-80s at the beginning of my career. During this time, I have been fortunate to have the opportunity to work with a variety of species of sharks, both in public accredited…

The “Sixth Extinction” Adds Urgency to Habitat and Climate Protection

It’s now unequivocal: the sixth great spasm of species extinctions has begun.   We – homo sapiens – are its cause. And only we can slow it down. Over the last century, the average rate of loss of vertebrate species — fish, amphibians, reptiles, birds and mammals – has been up to 100 times higher than…

Pope Calls for Sweeping Changes to Address Climate Change

Pope Francis’s highly anticipated encyclical on the environment, which may play a key role in the United Nations climate change conference in Paris later this year, was released today. Among its key focuses: climate change is real, it is getting worse and humans are a major cause. “Each year sees the disappearance of thousands of…

Sharks and Costa Rica

By Dr. Erick Ross Salazar of the MarViva Foundation (a Mission Blue partner) Sharks are an essential part of the oceans. Their presence is an indicator of the good health of an ecosystem; their absence is representative of an overfished and out of balance marine environment. Even though sharks have been traditionally vilified in movies and general media,…

Top 25 Photographs from the Wilderness #23

“Life in us is like the water in a river.” Henry David Thoreau The Okavango is the beating heart of Africa, home to an estimated 50% of the world’s elephants, most of the world’s hippo, and crucial populations of many other keystone species. There is no wilder place on earth: this is the Africa of…