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Mobula Munkiana – The Secret of El Barril

Clap, slap, clap clap clap! Mobula munkiana, also known as “Munk’s Devil Ray” explode out of the water around us like popcorn. Each, about the size of a coffee table in diameter, they leap out of the water and flap their wings as if they were able to take to the sky and fly like…

Filming a Time-Lapse of a Dolphin Carcass on the Seafloor Is No Easy Task

Learn how marine biologist Eddie Kisfaludy filmed the first long-term, time-lapse video of a dolphin carcass on the seafloor.

Would You Walk Into a Room With Millions of Bees?

Explorer and National Geographic grantee Chris Bashinelli visited rural Uganda to do a cultural exchange with small-scale farmers. He decided to face his fear of bees by going right into an apiary filled with venomous bees.

Best Job Ever: Conquering the World’s Largest Glaciers

“For me, it’s definitely worthwhile to live shorter, but intense,” says Vincent Colliard, a young explorer joining renowned polar explorer Børge Ousland in an endeavor to cross the world’s 20 largest glaciers. The ambitious 10-year journey is part of an effort to document climate change, an important mission for sure but one that regularly places the explorers in the path of danger.

Removing Oil Rigs from the North Sea – is Europe up for the Challenge?

The standards and rules for decommissioning offshore oil rigs are firmly established in the North Sea. When an oil platform is no longer economically viable, it must be removed. There is to be no dumping and abandoning these structures at sea. Save for substructures heavier than 10,000 tons, the bottom (so-called ‘footings’) of these structures…

Explorers’ Hearts Full This Thanksgiving

National Geographic explorers kicked off their Thanksgiving celebrations by sharing with us some of the things they are grateful for. From nightly raccoon visits to the smell of the ocean, our explorers continue to remind us to cherish the earth and celebrate the world around us.

India Reaches Mars With Low-Cost Mission

India’s new entrant into orbit around Mars, the Mars Orbiter Mission (MOM), is a triumph for its  space agency and represents the fourth country to successfully send a spacecraft to the red planet. At a reported cost of $73 million, the mission is also a feat for lower cost exploration. Launched on November 5, 2013,…

Castles in the Air: Experiences and Journeys in Unknown Bhutan

One hundred years ago, in 1914, National Geographic published its first article about the Himalayan kingdom of Bhutan: a compelling account of surveys of the region by John Claude White, a British Empire administrator and explorer. Profusely illustrated with his own photographs, White’s report lifted the veil on a mysterious land hidden in the world’s highest mountains.

Palau Expedition: The Future of the Past in Palau

Enric Sala and team are back in the big blue on their latest expedition to explore and document the world’s most pristine seas. This time, the destination is the Micronesian island group of Palau.

NASA’s Next Mars Rover Will Make Oxygen

NASA’s next Mars rover will pack a suite of sensors, cameras and an oxygen brewing kit.

July 27, 2014 Radio Show: Curing Cancer, Spending Summer Nights With Fireflies and More

This week on National Geographic Weekend, join host Boyd Matson and his guests as they invent a cheap cancer detection system, scour the earth’s poles for adventure, ingratiate themselves with a cheetah family, give the facts on fireflies, conjure life from the fangs of a viper, feed Africa from Africa, roadtrip across the United States in comfort, and photograph National Geographic’s past.

June 29, 2014: Refueling Satellites in Space, Sequencing the Koala Genome and More

Every week, embark with host Boyd Matson on an exploration of the latest discoveries and interviews with some of the most fascinating people on the planet, on National Geographic Weekend. This week, we walk in space to refuel a satellite, cure koalas of chlamydia, play soccer the Brazilian way, end elephant poaching in Tanzania, run out of air at the bottom of the Arctic Ocean, pair scientists with adventurers, road trip through the American South, and “revisit the Golden Age of Exploration.”

Shackleton Comic Brings Antarctica’s Heroic Age of Exploration to Life

A century ago, Ernest Shackleton planned the first trek from shore to shore across Antarctica. During their journey, he and the crew aboard the Endurance became stranded in ice along the Antarctic coast and nearly perished. Now their story is being told in a beautiful new graphic novel from artist Nick Bertozzi. The comic showcases their…

Headhunt Revisited

Text and Photos by iLCP Fellow Michele Westmorland, Headhunt Revisited project. In 1926, painter Caroline Mytinger and her friend, Margaret Warner, set out from San Francisco for a four-year adventure in the Solomon Islands and Papua New Guinea. With little more than $400, a few art supplies, and a trunk of clothing, they made their…

First Person: What I’m Learning on a Simulated Mars Mission

By Jim Urquhart for National Geographic “Mars has been flown by, orbited, smacked into, radar examined, and rocketed onto, as well as bounced upon, rolled over, shoveled, drilled into, baked, and even blasted. Still to come: Mars being stepped on.”—Buzz Aldrin In a remote stretch of Utah desert, five scientific researchers and one journalist, myself, came together this month…