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Coho Salmon Virtually ‘Swim’ Across Frank Lloyd Wright Building

Last night, just as darkness fell, the SF Projection Department and Turtle Island Restoration Network’s Salmon Protection And Watershed Network (SPAWN) met in front of Frank Lloyd Wright’s architectural masterpiece – the Marin County Civic Center. The buildings oval shaped windows and unique triangle spire, and historic landmark status coupled with the important legal and…

Green Technologies Lead to Clear Waters

By: Annie Reisewitz and Sarah Martin Coho salmon once flourished throughout the North Pacific, from Monterey Bay in central California up to Alaska’s Point Hope and across to Russia and Japan. Today many of those populations are extinct. With less than 10 percent of their historic population left, this iconic species holds an intrinsic economic,…

Say Goodbye to Bycatch: Fishing Smarter in the 21st Century

The Lindblad Expeditions-National Geographic (LEX-NG) Fund aims to protect the last wild places in the ocean while facilitating conservation, research, education, and community development programs in the places we explore. This blog entry spotlights some of the exciting work our grantees are doing with support from the LEX-NG Fund. Fishing nets are blind. They have…

Seal Pups: Ferociously Cute and Worth Protecting

Fur seal pups may be the cutest creatures in Antarctica—but they can give some serious attitude, as National Geographic grantee and wildlife biologist Douglas Krause finds out when he tries to make sure these animals are as healthy as they are adorable.

United for Salmon: Preserving the Pacific Northwest

The Lindblad Expeditions-National Geographic (LEX-NG) Fund aims to protect the last wild places in the ocean while facilitating conservation, research, education, and community development programs in the places we explore. This blog entry spotlights some of the exciting work our grantees are doing with support from the LEX-NG Fund. Here’s a question for you. What…

Fish Spawning Aggregations: an illusion of plenty

Spawning aggregations are massive gatherings of fish for breeding, a behavior shared by many species across the globe in many different habitats. They are predictable because they usually happen at the same place and at the same time each year, and humans have taken advantage of this to harvest large numbers of fish with minimal effort. But as harvesting keeps growing, fish populations keep diminishing.

Mesoamerican Race to Protect Parrotfish and the Reef

In a dramatic twist to the typical fishing tournament, this friendly competition among the four countries sharing the Mesoamerican reef (Belize, Guatemala, Honduras and Mexico) rewards international players who catch less fish and protect more coral reefs.

Fishy Parents Rejoice: Grades Rise, Few Fails on Caribbean’s Original Coral Reef Report Card

A report card from iLCP Partner Healthy Reefs for Healthy People, for the largest barrier reef in the Western Hemisphere – the Mesoamerican reef flanking the coasts of Mexico, Belize, Guatemala and Honduras – gives hope that it may earn this year’s award for “most improved,” or perhaps “happiest fish.”

How can you eat, eat, eat–and stay healthy? Ask a blind cavefish.

Barbecues and clambakes. Ice cream and berry pies. Summer is the season of food, food and more food. Is there a way to binge and still stay healthy? For answers, look far underground, say scientists, to the denizens of darkness: blind cavefish. Biologists studied blind cavefish, Astyanax mexicanus, living in freshwater pools in deep caves…

If you can’t beat ’em, eat ’em

There’s a growing trend among scuba divers in the Caribbean: they’re on the hunt for something tasty… Last month, the Glass Goby (Coryphopterus hyalinus) suffered a change in status on The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Previously considered of Least Concern to conservationists, this reef-dwelling fish is now listed as Vulnerable. And it isn’t alone.…

A Remote Trip in Search of Bahamian Queen Conch

Guest post by Dr. Andy Kough, research associate, Shedd Aquarium Queen conch, Lobatus gigas, is an iconic but threatened Caribbean species. The Bahamas are one of the last strongholds where conchs are still fished, but populations are in decline. The first step for protecting a species and replenishing its numbers is describing where healthy populations still…

Flood Carries River Monsters Onto the Land

The Texas floods provided an unusual reminder that our buildings and byways are a very recent arrival to this ancient landscape.

Achieving Sustainable Tuna

By Susan Jackson and Jennifer Dianto Kemmerly There is no endeavor quite like commercial tuna fishing. Perhaps no other industry is comprised of such a diverse group of stakeholders – with diverse opinions and approaches – that are so actively engaged in working toward a common goal. As many different voices weigh in to positively…

New Tool To Monitor Harmful Bacteria at Beaches

An international team, led by researchers has developed a new, timelier method to identify harmful bacteria levels on recreational beaches. The new model provides beach managers with a better prediction tool to identify when closures are required to protect beachgoers from harmful contaminates in the water. “The development of this new model has allowed us,…

Chefs: Please Stop Calling It “Trash Fish”

By Maria Finn I’m all for the spirit of the Trash Fish movement; getting lesser known species that were once discarded into the hands of skillful chefs who make them shine. I just don’t like the name. Chefs Collaborative has been holding “Trash Fish” dinners around the county since 2013 and they’ve started a seafood…