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Tag archives for fisheries

Fish 2.0 Network Scales Sustainable Seafood Businesses

“Fish 2.0 accelerated our business to a fundamentally different level.” “It’s boosted the confidence and pride of board and staff in our business model, in addition to validating our model with current and potential funders.” “Winning Fish 2.0 was a huge event for our young company.” Barely six months past the 2015 Fish 2.0 Finals,…

Uncharted Arctic waters: A new opportunity for exploitation, or conservation?

Co-authored by Erica Cirino When thick sheets of sea ice began melting in the Arctic waters around Svalbard, Norway, a few years ago, a new expanse of sparkling blue sea opened up. As climate change continues to drive ice melt here on the previously untouched waters of the North Barents Sea, what many ocean conservationists…

Community-Supported Fisheries: A better way to buy fish?

Co-authored by Erica Cirino It’s about five o’clock on an unusually warm Wednesday evening when I’m driving back home from a friend’s house a few towns over. When I’m nearly home, I pass a particularly pretty strip of beaches and marinas somewhere on Long Island’s North Shore. Some combination of the salty ocean breeze, softly…

After Winston: Assessing Coral Reefs for Cyclone Damage and Coral Bleaching

Over the next 10 days, through the generous support of Nai’a Cruises — a live-aboard ship that has been diving in Fiji since 1993 — WCS Fiji Director Sangeeta Mangubhai will be surveying coral reefs throughout the Vatu-i-Ra Seascape to assess the damage caused by Cyclone Winston and collect data on coral bleaching. This is the first in a series of blogs on that survey.

What Are We Actually Protecting In The Ocean?

One of the great recent success stories in conservation is the rapid increase in the establishment of marine protected areas (MPAs). Since 2006, there has been a staggering growth of 10 million km2 of new MPAs globally, a nearly four-fold increase over the past decade. Yet there has been no baseline for measuring how well our marine species are represented in protected areas. Until now.

A new paper we have published in Nature’s Scientific Reports assesses the overlap of global MPAs with the ranges of 17,348 marine species (fishes, mammals, invertebrates). We have discovered some sobering results: most marine species are not well represented within MPAs and several hundred species are not covered at all.

As Paris Delegates Debate Emissions, Climate Adaptation Is Finding Solutions

While world leaders at the Conference of Parties (COP) meetings in Paris negotiate reductions of global carbon emissions, a number of organizations are already working to implement solutions to the problems those emissions create. Many conservation and development institutions are focused on applied solutions to both the current and future impacts of climate change. Such efforts are helping wildlife and ecosystems adapt to changing climatic conditions.

Seal Pups: Ferociously Cute and Worth Protecting

Fur seal pups may be the cutest creatures in Antarctica—but they can give some serious attitude, as National Geographic grantee and wildlife biologist Douglas Krause finds out when he tries to make sure these animals are as healthy as they are adorable.

A Plea for Adélie (Penguins)

Last week in an obscure stone building in Hobart Tasmania, representatives from 24 nations plus the European Union, sat in stiff dark suits around a large table, making decisions that will determine the fate of one of our great global commons, the Southern Ocean. They discussed proposals for expansive marine protected areas, including in the…

4 Steps to Improve Ocean Conservation Research in Small Island States

To be effective, marine conservation must be based on rigorous and targeted science. The large and growing threats to ocean ecosystems — overfishing, climate change, pollution, and habitat destruction — coupled with the limited scientific capacity of most small island states make science-based management not only an imperative, but also a challenge. Here’s one part…

Fish Spawning Aggregations: an illusion of plenty

Spawning aggregations are massive gatherings of fish for breeding, a behavior shared by many species across the globe in many different habitats. They are predictable because they usually happen at the same place and at the same time each year, and humans have taken advantage of this to harvest large numbers of fish with minimal effort. But as harvesting keeps growing, fish populations keep diminishing.

Wild Fisheries: New Hope for the Blue Economy

By Amanda Leland What is the blue economy? Hundreds of people from around the world are gathered this week in Cascais, Portugal at The Economist’s World Ocean Summit 2015 to answer this question and discuss ways to catalyze growth in this important sector. Historically, capture fisheries have been the leading edge of the blue economy. Communities,…

Mapping Ocean Wealth – Informing a Sustainable Ocean Economy

By Mark Spalding, marine scientist, The Nature Conservancy I’m a somewhat recalcitrant tweeter. I’m not quite sure whether it’s worth the effort, but last month I joined a trending topic, a first for me. I tweeted: #IAmAScientistBecause I want to explain to people how much we all NEED nature. It was honest, but I wondered…

From Laws on Paper to Enforcement on the Water: Sustainable Ocean Management Gets Real in Barbuda

Co-authored by Andy Estep, Science Manager of the Waitt Institute For the first time in the history of Barbuda, law enforcement agents from four agencies gathered in the Codrington Fisheries Complex to collaborate on the enforcement of ocean laws in the island’s waters. This important step will ensure that the community reaps the benefits of new…

Livelihoods, Jobs, and the Illegal Wildlife Trade

By John G. Robinson

The illegal wildlife trade is big business. Not including the illegal trade in timber, it exceeds $19 billion annually. The trade is heavily capitalized and is part of the same criminal networks that are involved in drugs, weapons and human trafficking. While the impacts on wildlife populations – including elephants, tigers, and fish species – are widely known, the effects on human livelihoods, community integrity, income-generating jobs, sustainable development, and national economies are equally pervasive.

An Oysterman Hero in Apalachicola

On day 44, the Glades to Gulf expedition had an opportunity to spend a day with third-generation Apalachicola oysterman, Kendall Schoelles, who gives hope that the oyster fishery and lifestyle can still be saved.