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Financing Sustainable Fisheries With Impact Investments

Impact IQ – What’s good for the fish is good for the fishing communities — and for impact investors. That’s the thesis of three new vehicles for investing in sustainable fisheries that will be tested in the Philippines, Chile, and Brazil over the next two years and then offered to investors more broadly. Former New York City…

European Union Fisheries Ban Ignores Belize Conservation Success Story

In its coastal fisheries, Belize is leading the way in innovative management strategies designed to preserve biodiversity in a manner that keeps fishermen on the water and focused on the long-term sustainability of fish stocks. Future generations of Belizeans will be able to carry on their rich fishing traditions thanks to the decisions, at times quite difficult, being made right now.

Can Behavioral Economics Help Save Coral Reefs and Fisheries?

It’s not that people don’t care about the environment; it’s that more pressing needs like feeding their families and paying their bills trump environmental concerns. As a marine biologist, I worry about how poverty can hinder the sustainability of fishing, and therefore endanger the future of fishing communities. The “teach a man to fish” adage can only hold…

Tackling Overfishing on Many Fronts

As the World Ocean Summit winds down in Half Moon Bay, California, this evening, much discussion among the hundreds of gathered delegates has turned to overfishing.  There were perhaps as many thoughts on the subject as members in attendance from the fishing industry, academia, conservation organizations, and the media. But, several solutions emerged that received…

Can World Leaders Tame the Wild West of the High Seas?

Earlier this month, Indonesia announced the world’s largest sanctuary for manta rays. At the World Ocean Summit Tuesday, Peter Seligmann, the CEO of Conservation International, said the sanctuary “was not done out of good will, it was done out of enlightened self interest.” Seligmann said Indonesia had made careful calculations about how much manta rays…

Supply Chains Are Key to Change for Sustainable Fisheries and Oceans

When we buy seafood, whether it’s salmon, scallops, or sea bass, we may ask where the fish is from or how fresh it is. Is it local? Caught today? Farmed? And we may conjure up an image of a fisherman on the water, but we rarely think about the full path that fish took on…

Conflict Coast: Mozambique’s Primeiras E Segundas Archipelago

Conservation photographer and iLCP Fellow, James Morgan, documents the economic realities of local fisherman, in an outwardly booming and prosperous Mozambique. One of the world’s fastest growing economies, with Scandinavia, Brazil, China and the U.S. among its foreign investors–thanks to enormous untapped oil and gas reserves in the north of the country–over half of Mozambique’s population remains in absolute poverty, surviving on less than a dollar a day. To feed and clothe their families, coastal Mozambicans are finding that they must combine livelihoods, with the majority both fishing and working the land to eke out a living. Words by Cara Jessop.

Photographing the End of the Kreef

“It is currently estimated that numbers of rock lobster on the West Coast of South Africa are perilously low, at only three percent of their original pre-exploitation or pristine levels.” Conservation photographer and iLCP Fellow, Cheryl-Samantha Owen shares truths about how over-fishing and poaching has damaged the stock of these invaluable crustaceans. However, their demise, is not irreversible. Last year the Southern African Sustainable Seafood Initiative (SASSI) downgraded the rock lobster’s status from green (go ahead – best choice) to orange (think twice about buying this species please).

Who Wants to Bring Back Overfishing?

This article was originally published by the Center for American Progress. Reading headlines about the declining state of the world’s fisheries is enough to turn any carnivore to a steady diet of beef, pork, and chicken. But the reality is, particularly here in America, regulators and fishermen have done an admirable job ending the practice of overfishing and made…

Protecting Coral Reefs, From the FL Keys to the Savu Sea

By Rob Brumbaugh, Integrated Ocean Management Lead, The Nature Conservancy I’ve just returned from Bali, Indonesia, where I spent three weeks working with The Nature Conservancy’s Indonesia marine program, and attending an international conference of scientists and economists exploring ways to make the human benefits of nature more apparent to policy makers and stakeholders everywhere. …

Establish the National Endowment for the Oceans

This post originally was originally published by the Center for American Progress. Politico reported last week that Congress seems to be done legislating for 2013. While such an outcome wouldn’t be shocking for an anemic legislative body with a 9 percent approval rating that spends more time talking about a broken website than its own…

MPAs for Fish Fillets in the Coral Triangle (2)

A recent Asia Development Bank report estimates that some 4.9 million people work as fishers across a selection of the Asia Pacific region (the Coral Triangle countries: Indonesia, Malaysia, Papua New Guinea, Philippines, Solomon Islands, and Timor L’Este). Between 2007 and 2009, seafood constituted approximately 20 percent of the animal protein consumed in Coral Triangle…

Innovating the Business of Seafood for Communities & Health

By Amanda Nagai Certifications and barcode trackers can help shoppers identify seafood at the fish counter, but for consumers who really want to know what they’re eating, the real key may be genuine relationships with the people who hauled in the catch. From Alaska to San Francisco to Boston, conservationist Native Americans, seafood entrepreneurs, and nonprofit…

Fukushima Fallout Not Affecting U.S.-Caught Fish

This article was originally published by the Center for American Progress. In recent weeks, there has been a significant uptick in news from Fukushima, Japan. Officials from the Japanese government and the Tokyo Electric Power Company, or TEPCO, admitted that radioactive water is still leaking from the nuclear plant crippled by the 2011 earthquake and…

Can Technology End Pirate Fishing?

Last week, a 60-meter Japanese fishing vessel following the Benguela Current northward along the southwest coast of Africa entered Angolan waters, where it remained for some five days before returning to international waters to meet side-by-side with a Japanese reefer vessel. That activity is more than suspicious. Ships don’t just accidentally drift into the exclusive…