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Tag archives for fishing

The Good and The Bad for Atlantic Menhaden

Co-authored by Elizabeth Brown On May 5th the Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission met to make pivotal decisions about the management of Atlantic Menhaden – arguably one of the most important fish in the sea. Two keys decisions were up for discussion: 1.) What to set the Atlantic Menhaden catch limit at. Or, in other words,…

Inside an Ancient Fishing Technique That’s Still Feeding People Today

With just a small boat, a big net, and a lot of manpower, beach seine netting continues to feed people thousands of years after its invention.

Shrimp Fisheries Improving in Gulf of Mexico, Thanks In Part to Seafood Suppliers

By Megan Westmeyer Fishery improvement projects (FIPs) are based on the premise that the seafood industry itself is the strongest force for driving improvements in fisheries, and a group of shrimp suppliers from the Gulf of Mexico has shown us how it’s done. Cox’s Wholesale Seafood, Katie’s Seafood Market, National Fish and Seafood, and Philly…

Obama Gives Bristol Bay Fishermen A Great Christmas Present!

By Carl Safina and Elizabeth Brown Last month, President Obama used his executive power to protect Alaska’s Bristol Bay from future oil and gas drilling. Bristol Bay is a 52,000 square mile area (roughly the size of Florida), north of the Aleutian Islands that the largest surviving salmon populations on Earth swim through on their…

Next Steps for U.S. Pirate Fishing Rules

Do you know if your seafood dinner was caught and imported legally? Chances are good now that you wouldn’t be able to find out. But this week, a special task force of a dozen federal agencies released recommendations on how the U.S. can rein in illegal, or pirate, fishing and make seafood more traceable and sustainable.…

Exploring Indonesia’s Last of the Wild – the Forgotten Islands

By Stuart Campbell and Nils Krueck

The Forgotten Islands occupy a region in the southeastern Indonesian province of Maluku, a sparsely-populated area covering about 50,000 square kilometers that includes a vast expanse of coral reefs. As the region’s name suggests, not much is known about these reefs and their associated fisheries. One important reason for this is that for much of the year the seas are wild and unable to be accessed. Another reason is that Maluku’s Forgotten Islands support around 70,000 people who practice traditional customs that hark back to before the conversion of communities to Christianity. These customs include the guarding of marine resources against occasional visitors, such as nomadic fishers from central Indonesia

Fishing for Our Future With Lures From the Past

Nahaku Kalei explains more about sustainable fish-eating and the data being gathered by the Worldwide Voyage.

The Peel River Watershed: The Endangered Wilderness of Canada’s Yukon

This article is brought to you by the International League of Conservation Photographers (iLCP). Read our other articles on the National Geographic Voices blog featuring the work of our iLCP Fellow Photographers all around the world. Text and photos by Peter Mather, Fellow at the International League of Conservation Photographers. From the front seat of our Cessna 172, the…

Is Your Salmon Small Because of Hungry Cavemen?

Stone Age fishermen in northern Spain selected the biggest whoppers, leaving us with a smaller catch, a new study claims.

Life in the Great Barrier Reef

The Khaled bin Sultan Living Oceans Foundation conducts scientific surveys on coral reefs around the world to determine the health and resilience of the reef. The primary scientific goals of the Expeditions are to map and characterize coral reef ecosystems, identify their current status and major threats, and examine factors that enhance their ability to resist, survive and recover from major disturbance events like bleaching, cyclone damage, or Crown of Thorns outbreaks. iLCP Fellow Jürgen Freund documents an expedition to the magnificent Great Barrier Reef.

Busting Indonesia’s Manta Gill Trade

Worth up to US$30 million a year, the global trade in manta ray gills depends on the industry traders for its survival. The recent arrest of a major Indonesian trader in manta ray gills marks the first time in the country’s history that anyone has been brought to justice in a case of marine conservation. It’s also proof of the determination of Indonesian authorities to stamp out the killing of one of the country’s most serene and majestic species; one that attracts US$ 140 million dollars every year in global tourism. Text and photos by Paul Hilton.

The Coral Triangle: Amazon of the Oceans

Home to over three quarters of the world’s coral species, The Coral Triangle is the underwater equivalent of the Amazon. It encompasses an area half the size of the United States and harbours more marine species than anywhere else on the planet. From Borneo down to the edge of the South Pacific, the Coral Triangle has some of the most breathtaking underwater landscapes, but the majority are buckling under the pressures of overfishing, resource extraction and climate change. Text and Photos by iLCP Fellow James Morgan.

Small Caribbean Island Shows Bold Ocean Leadership: Barbuda Overhauls Reef and Fisheries Management for Sustainability

On August 12th, Barbuda Council signed into law a sweeping set of new ocean management regulations that zone their coastal waters, strengthen fisheries management, and establish a network of marine sanctuaries. This comes after seventeen months of extensive community consultation and scientific research supported by the Waitt Institute. With these new policies, the small island…

Palau Plans to Ban Commercial Fishing, Create Enormous Marine Reserve

By Carl Safina and Elizabeth Brown The people of Palau, a small island nation in the northwestern Pacific, have long realized that the health and prosperity of their nation depends on the ocean. Because of this realization, Palauans have always worked to protect their ocean resources.  That’s why Palau has drawn the world’s top scientists…

Healthy Seas and Healthy Communities: The People of Honduras’ Mesoamerican Reef

International League of Conservation Photographers (iLCP) Fellow Karen Kasmauski travels to the Bay Islands off the coast of Honduras with partners from the Centro de Estudios Marinos Honduras (CEM). The region is part of the Mesoamerican Reef, a marine region extending along the Caribbean coast of Honduras, Guatemala, Belize and Mexico. Ecological pressures to the area, including population, overfishing, pollution and climate change have affected the reef. These pressures have stressed fishing communities all along the coast of these Central American countries. Fishermen have to stay out longer and travel farther to match the number of fish caught in previous years.