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A Bluefin Tuna for $118,000: Going, Going … Gone?

By Maria Damanaki, Global Managing Director for Oceans at The Nature Conservancy Bluefin tuna is one of the ocean’s most prized fish, an icon of both modern and classic civilizations and a key predator in the ocean’s delicate food chain. And yet its very existence on this planet is now up to us — the…

California Driftnet Fishery: One in Eight Fish Caught Is the Targeted Swordfish

Turtle Island’s latest report, California Driftnet Fishery: The True Costs of a 20th Century Fishery in the 21st Century Overview, by Doug Karpa, Peter Fugazzotto and Todd Steiner, makes a compelling case for phasing out this deadly swordfish fishery that kills large numbers of whales, dolphins, sharks and non-target fish. The report exposes the facts about…

Top 15 Ocean Conservation Wins of 2015

Overfishing, climate change, habitat destruction, and pollution remain major threats to the world’s ocean. But amidst all that there is some seriously good ocean conservation news worth celebrating. So, to continue the tradition started last year with listing 14 Ocean Conservation Wins of 2014, here’s a rundown for 2015 that will hopefully fill you with…

Skadar Lake – Joining Forces to Save the Last Breeding Colony of Dalmatian Pelicans in Montenegro

Since the 17th century, 80% of the Dalmatian Pelican’s breeding sites have disappeared, but efforts in Montenegro’s Lake Skadar aim to protect and stabilize its population.

Seal Pups: Ferociously Cute and Worth Protecting

Fur seal pups may be the cutest creatures in Antarctica—but they can give some serious attitude, as National Geographic grantee and wildlife biologist Douglas Krause finds out when he tries to make sure these animals are as healthy as they are adorable.

The Arctic Is Changing … Or Is It?

While the world is captivated by the environmental changes in the far north, the people who live there are eager for changes of another kind.

A Fisherman and Conservationist: A Kenyan Fisherman Restores Corals for 40 Years

By Jennifer O’Leary and Arthur Tuda Pascal Yaa is a small-scale octopus fisherman who has been fishing the coral reefs off Mombasa, Kenya since 1968. As a spear-fisher, Pascal swims the reefs daily with a mask and snorkel. Recently, he has been disturbed by what he is seeing. Increasingly, fishing nets and boats are damaging…

Protecting Indigenous Peoples’ Rights, Conserving Biodiversity

By Lilian Painter

On August 9 the world will commemorate the International Day of the World’s Indigenous Peoples. This year the focus is on health and wellbeing. That topic engages me particularly as a conservationist working in the Amazon. The Bolivia program of WCS (Wildlife Conservation Society) has shown that the interests of indigenous peoples and conservation are not only compatible but also dependent on each other.

The Movie BP (Probably) Doesn’t Want You To See

By Andrew Kornblatt Opening this week, a film called “The Runner,” starring Nicolas Cage and Mad Men’s Bryan Batt, is causing both marine biologists and politicians to take note. This film depicts a tragic hero Congressman, played by Mr. Cage, crusading for the rights of fishermen in his district in early days following BP’s Deepwater Horizon…

Expedition Madagascar: Conserving Coral Reefs with Community Conservation

By Dr. Emily Darling

With colleagues from WCS (Wildlife Conservation Society), we recently surveyed the first community-led Marine Protected Areas (MPAs) in Madagascar. These areas provide genuine hope for coral reef conservation and small-scale fisheries management under the shadow of emerging oil and gas development, deforestation, illegal fishing and climate change.

Oil spill impacts the developing hearts of fish

There is increasing concern as to the potential impacts of oil spills on the health of fish. A little over five years ago, the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico released more than 636 million liters of crude oil. The oiled covered spawning areas for many commercially and ecologically important fishes. Accordingly,…

The Good and The Bad for Atlantic Menhaden

Co-authored by Elizabeth Brown On May 5th the Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission met to make pivotal decisions about the management of Atlantic Menhaden – arguably one of the most important fish in the sea. Two keys decisions were up for discussion: 1.) What to set the Atlantic Menhaden catch limit at. Or, in other words,…

Inside an Ancient Fishing Technique That’s Still Feeding People Today

With just a small boat, a big net, and a lot of manpower, beach seine netting continues to feed people thousands of years after its invention.

Shrimp Fisheries Improving in Gulf of Mexico, Thanks In Part to Seafood Suppliers

By Megan Westmeyer Fishery improvement projects (FIPs) are based on the premise that the seafood industry itself is the strongest force for driving improvements in fisheries, and a group of shrimp suppliers from the Gulf of Mexico has shown us how it’s done. Cox’s Wholesale Seafood, Katie’s Seafood Market, National Fish and Seafood, and Philly…

Obama Gives Bristol Bay Fishermen A Great Christmas Present!

By Carl Safina and Elizabeth Brown Last month, President Obama used his executive power to protect Alaska’s Bristol Bay from future oil and gas drilling. Bristol Bay is a 52,000 square mile area (roughly the size of Florida), north of the Aleutian Islands that the largest surviving salmon populations on Earth swim through on their…