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Tag archives for fishing

Seven ways fishing trawlers aren’t great for the seabed

I’m writing this in the high Arctic at 78º North Latitude in early July, aboard Greenpeace’s Arctic Sunrise where I’m a guest for a few days, with 24-hour daylight and gleaming glaciers in the valleys of snow-capped coastal mountains. We’re here because shrinking sea ice and warming ocean water is moving fish farther north, and…

If payers don’t sway players, what does funding tell you?

Several people have objected to the recent piece here by me and Greenpeace’s John Hocevar, so I am following up with this. That earlier piece explained a complaint by Greenpeace alleging that fisheries scientist Ray Hilborn has often not properly disclosed industry funding in his scientific publications. The people writing in to object to that piece…

The Safina Center celebrates World Oceans Day

Co-authored by Erica Cirino Oceans are essential to life on Earth: They cover more than two-thirds of the planet and contain 97 percent of its water. They absorb carbon from the atmosphere, helping regulate our climate. They provide humans with food and transportation routes for trade and travel. And best of all, they’re filled with…

Even in fish science, payers may sway players

Co-authored by John Hocevar Please see also the follow-up to this post, responding to some of the criticism and further explaining Carl’s perspective. The people of Seattle enjoy a closer-than-average relationship with the sea, fishing, and ocean science. Of course Seattle is home to a world famous fish market; after all, seafood, fish, and fishing are part of…

The unseen significance of whales

Co-authored by Jessica Perelman Jessica is a recent graduate of the University of Southern California with a degree in biological sciences. She will be attending veterinary school next year and plans to pursue a career in wildlife and conservation veterinary medicine. When the International Whaling Commission (IWC) placed a moratorium on commercial whaling in 1982, the initial…

Industrialization of the oceans: Is it time to dive into the “blue economy”?

Co-authored by Erica Cirino When I was a kid, I spent most of my summer days exploring my local Long Island beach. I’d watch birds, build sand castles and—ever the entrepreneur—would dig up quahog clams to sell, for a quarter each, to my neighbors who lay sunbathing on their beach blankets on the shore. Little…

Abandoned fishing nets: The irony of the sea that keeps on catching (and killing)

Co-authored by Erica Cirino It was a cool morning in early spring when a group of volunteer divers jumped off their boat into the calm, turquoise waters off Makronisos Island in Greece. Under the surface lay before them lay a vast reef wonderland, complete with bizarrely shaped corals, colorful fish and even a dilapidated shipwreck.…

Fish 2.0 Network Scales Sustainable Seafood Businesses

“Fish 2.0 accelerated our business to a fundamentally different level.” “It’s boosted the confidence and pride of board and staff in our business model, in addition to validating our model with current and potential funders.” “Winning Fish 2.0 was a huge event for our young company.” Barely six months past the 2015 Fish 2.0 Finals,…

Tagging Adorable, Nasty Little Penguins: #bestjobever

The world has had a love affair with penguins for some time now. Their tuxedo-colored feathers, waddling walk, and awkward mannerisms make them easy to adore. But get too close to penguins—chinstrap penguins in particular—and your endearing perception of these birds may be tested, given their penchant for projectile pooping and beating each other up.

Uncharted Arctic waters: A new opportunity for exploitation, or conservation?

Co-authored by Erica Cirino When thick sheets of sea ice began melting in the Arctic waters around Svalbard, Norway, a few years ago, a new expanse of sparkling blue sea opened up. As climate change continues to drive ice melt here on the previously untouched waters of the North Barents Sea, what many ocean conservationists…

So you live near a coral reef: Why experts say that’s not good news for reef conservation

Co-authored by Erica Cirino My favorite beach on Long Island’s North Shore, where I live, is more than 700 miles away from the nearest coral reef (in Bermuda). This distance may be a good thing: Recent research suggests the further a coral reef is from human civilization, the better. (To get close from far away,…

How Can We Catch Tuna and Protect Sharks?

Mike Sweeney, Managing Director of Global Fisheries, The Nature Conservancy Steven Victor, Director of Micronesia Program, The Nature Conservancy Shark fin soup has become a symbol of mistreatment of marine life. Sharks caught for their fins are tossed back into the sea. Unable to swim, they starve to death, are eaten or drown. People pay…

A Bluefin Tuna for $118,000: Going, Going … Gone?

By Maria Damanaki, Global Managing Director for Oceans at The Nature Conservancy Bluefin tuna is one of the ocean’s most prized fish, an icon of both modern and classic civilizations and a key predator in the ocean’s delicate food chain. And yet its very existence on this planet is now up to us — the…

California Driftnet Fishery: One in Eight Fish Caught Is the Targeted Swordfish

Turtle Island’s latest report, California Driftnet Fishery: The True Costs of a 20th Century Fishery in the 21st Century Overview, by Doug Karpa, Peter Fugazzotto and Todd Steiner, makes a compelling case for phasing out this deadly swordfish fishery that kills large numbers of whales, dolphins, sharks and non-target fish. The report exposes the facts about…

Top 15 Ocean Conservation Wins of 2015

Overfishing, climate change, habitat destruction, and pollution remain major threats to the world’s ocean. But amidst all that there is some seriously good ocean conservation news worth celebrating. So, to continue the tradition started last year with listing 14 Ocean Conservation Wins of 2014, here’s a rundown for 2015 that will hopefully fill you with…